Books to learn???

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by redrover3569, Nov 1, 2010.

  1. redrover3569

    redrover3569 New Member

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    Is there a line of textbook style books where each book covers a type of weapon such as pump shotguns, semi-auto handguns, revolvers, etc.? Books that will cover names of parts and their functions, disassembly to reassembly. Right now I barely know the difference between a firing pin spring and a striker spring but I'm fascinated with the workmanship and mechanics of guns and I have an overwhelming desire to learn more so I need somewhere to begin. I'm just a passanger on this ride for now but some day I'd like to drive.
     
  2. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    For a quick way to learn the basics, go to Brownell's and study the schematics of the guns there. It's a great way to become familiar with the correct part names and just how many parts the modern gun has. Sure there are lots of books but I like to learn the old fashioned way - by taking them apart and studying...
     

  3. Drriley

    Drriley New Member

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    If you want to start with older firearms, Brownell's has a manual that breaks down
    most guns made before 1960. Expensive from Brownells ($100) but also available
    on ebay and amazon as used books.

    The "Encyclopedia of Modern Firearms - Parts & Assembly" by Bob Brownell has come cut down pictures as well as parts diagrams and step by step break down procedures.

    The NRA offers through their web site store the "NRA Guide to Rifles and Shotguns"
    and the "NRA Guide to Pistols and Revolvers" aka Firearms Assebly 3 & 4.

    For on-line schematics you can also go to Numrich Gun Parts Corporation .
     
  4. redrover3569

    redrover3569 New Member

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    thanks

    I appreciate the replies. I prefer to learn hands on as well NGIB. However, being a truckdriver, I have more time to read than to do. I'll check out Brownell's to see what I can find. Once I've done some reading I intend to buy some practice pieces.
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    There is a great book that is a bit dated, but it taught me a lot called "Accurizing the Factory Rifle" I think the author is named Macpherson.

    Gives a good break down on a factory bolt action, what some of the properties do under fire and what steps improve it. It's not a dull, technical read with lots of references to page lists and I got my monies worth out of it.

    Brownell's is another great source as my cohorts have mentioned.

    JD
     
  6. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    Brownells does offer disassembly/reassenbly/gunsmithing books and videos. Just go to their website and order them as you require.
     
  7. Biohazard2

    Biohazard2 Member

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    Just for looking and naming parts, you may want to try Numrich Gun Parts.
    They have the breakdowns of most guns.
     
  8. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I use the Gun Digest firearm assembly/disassembly books all the time. They come for different firearms. I currently have the ones for Shotguns, Bolt Action Rifles, Semi-Automatic rifles, Revolvers and Semi-Automatic Pistols. I was gifted one on customizing the 10/22 Rifle.

    I play around with all of my firearms, and they are an invaluable tool to have. Here's a link to the Gun Digest website. You'll find a plethora of firearm books there, not just how to stuff.

    The Gun Digest® Book of Firearms Assembly/Disassembly Part IV: Centerfire Rifles - GunDigestStore.com

    Notice the subtle way I worked plethora into this? ;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2010
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    And hit the local library- 623.4 is the section for firearms. They have a surfeit of books- and can get you most on an interlibrary loan for a buck or less. (notice how I worked surfeit in there? :p)
     
  10. redrover3569

    redrover3569 New Member

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    WOW! I checked out Brownell's. There seems to be a lot of what I'm looking for there. Inexpensive too. I also saved the Numrich website for later reference. Thanks a lot. This will keep my brain busy for a while so it will quite driving me crazy over the things I want to know.
     
  11. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Seriously? Dewey Decimel just rolled over in his numbered grave. :eek:

    No one knows the Dewey System C3. Are you secretly married to a hot librarian?!?! :cool:
     
  12. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    ... and if not, why not?
     
  13. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    He says to the walking, talking encyclopedia........ :rolleyes:
     
  14. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    I have it tattooed on the sole of my left foot. Library of Congress numbers on the right.

    :p
     
  15. pattho0

    pattho0 New Member

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    I can personally recommend the books by Patrick Sweeney (I believe they are availabel from Brownell's):
    Gunsmithing: Shotguns
    Gunsmithing: Rifles
    They are aimed at the beginner and medium experience type of guy. Best of luck with all of your future projects:)
     
  16. redrover3569

    redrover3569 New Member

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    I know I've not been posting many responses here but I am checking in regularly and tracking down your suggestions. I appreciate all of them and I'm finding lots of good things.
     
  17. PerpetualStudent

    PerpetualStudent New Member

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    Hey Redrover, how goes your quest for knowledge?

    The Mind is like a Parachute. It only works when it's open.
     
  18. Thegunbildr

    Thegunbildr New Member

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    I would suggest videos, the show you part you can physically see them move and interact with each other, the r you tube put on by midway and some mini AGI videos to. you can also purchase AGI videos. something to think about
     
  19. superc

    superc Member

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    It is probably really hard to interest a Publisher in starting such a line from scratch. Then there is the issue of holding the writer's interest to the project. What we see is individual books on specific guns written by different authors from various publishers.

    For the second half of the 20th century to the present for US military weapons there exist Field Manuals (FMs) and Technical Manuals (TMs). The FMs are intended for users, while the TMs are intended for repairmen (i.e., ordnance techs in this instance). Many of the FMs and TMs are available either as used books, or PDF downloads.

    There are also firearms that have ignited enough collector interest so that individual authors have written multiple tomes about them. Lugers and Colt Single Action Army revolvers or the Thompson SMG are a great example of that. Collectors of such arcane things love to get the books and then argue about whether or not this or that author made an error on page 115 or was the other author correct. Some even forget about the gun but instead write new books (or lengthy blogs) about which author should be ignored.

    Other guns with smaller audiences get only one or two books about them. The .35 Remington or the pocket Colts or the Ingram 10 comes to mind.

    Regarding the general thrust of your question, a series of books, all by the same author, the gunsmithing series by Kuhnhausen is the only one that I can offhand think of. I am sure there are other comparative works, but I have missed seeing them. If you own one of the guns Kuhnhausen has written about, by all means get that book (or two if one of the guns he has two books about).

    Some guns get 20 or more books but only one or two are must reads. Clawson and Goddard and Kuhnhausen, when dealing with the 1911 come to mind as must haves in my opinion.

    When reading about guns there are some must reads. Which one is appropriate is partially determined by where your interest lies. I put Hatcher's Notebook in my must reads list, So too is Smith's Small Arms of the World. Note, you are going to have to hunt on Amazon for some of the out of print books, but it is worth your time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2011
  20. SteveK

    SteveK New Member

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    Try AGI they have a video library on what you want to do. Since you are a truck driver don't know how much time you would have to watch a video. americangunsmith.com