Bluntline Specials

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by JiroZero713, Jan 22, 2009.

  1. JiroZero713

    JiroZero713 Active Member

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    Buntline Specials

    Can anyone give me any information on them.

    A friend of mine may possibly have an authentic Buntline from 1877 or a possible reproduction from Colt.


    It looks aged so we believe it might be an original Buntline from 1877...not sure...would be crazy if it was.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It apparently functions and the cylinder moves....and seems to be in ok condition with barely any rust on it...if you could even call it rust.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009
  2. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Don't know much about the wheel gun but that's a nice P08.

    Any more pics?
     

  3. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    The odds of it being an original buntline is higher than me winning the lottery, being voted in as president, and dating miss America-all in the same day! Your friend has an Italian reproduction, and while I don't have my blue book in front of me, I wouldn't expect it to be terribly high in collector's value, but you never know.
     
  4. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    So how did you determine that it's from 1877? Rather than 1878 or maybe 1995?

    What are the markings? Serial number? Not saying that it's not an original, but the
    chances are REALLY REALLY slim.
     
  5. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Most recently the entire subject of "Original Buntlines" has been brought into question. Ned Buntline (nee Edwin C. Judson) was indeed a historical personage, but his association with Colt and the gunmen with whom he had contact now seems more legend than fact.

    Bob Wright
     
  6. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    I knew that Ned Buntline was a writer's surname, but not knowing his actual name, didn't want to look like an uneducated fool.




     
  7. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Not knowing makes a man uneducated. Refusing to learn makes a man a fool.

    All of us are uneducated in some subjects.

    Bob Wright
     
  8. JiroZero713

    JiroZero713 Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Apparently some of the newer ones would have some type of tag on them. This one does not.

    His grandfather won it in a card game a long long time ago meaning it may have come into his possession very early in the 1900s or even before.

    They look like 9s in this pic but he claims they are 8...he needs to get a picture with no flash next.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009
  9. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    IF it IS an original Buntline, I would think he could almost write his own amount on somebody's check that wants it.

    Just now remembered-Colt DID make some either 2nd or 3rd generation models when the wild west craze fist came along-NOT to be confused with modern S A S S shooting sports.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009
  10. JiroZero713

    JiroZero713 Active Member

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    Good Gravy almighty. If it is an orginal he's probably sitting on a million farking dollars.

    He talked with a teacher who knew about them. His teacher told him about the italian models and what to look for. His teacher is somewhat convinced it's an original.
     
  11. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Well---looks like it might be a Colt, and a "Buntline Special", but it dates
    quite a bit newer than 1877. More like 1957 or newer.

    What is the Serial Number?? X out the last couple of digits. Looks like
    the Buntline Specials are in the normal Single Action Army serial number ranges, so we can date it to the year.

    Blue Book--(24 edition, I need to get a new one!!) list a price for the
    1957-1975 Buntline Special from $750 for a 60% to $1,695 for a 100%
    Not sure yours would even make 60% from the pictures.

    Quote:

    Colt never did refer to their long barreled sixguns of the period as Buntline Specials. Their Single Actions were never officially dubbed Peacemakers either. It was simply the Model P. In 1957 they did tie into the legend of the long barrels with the introduction of the Second Generation Buntline Specials. Instead of the standard barrel marking of "COLT SINGLE ACTION ARMY .45" on the left side of the barrel, all of these modern long barreled .45's are marked "COLT BUNTLINE SPECIAL .45". They are in the same serial number range as other Single Action Army Models however, the early Buntline Specials are numbered on the barrel in front of the cylinder pin also. According to Don Wilkerson's The Post-War Colt Single-Action Army, 1650 Buntlines were produced in 1958, while a total of 4000 blued and 65 nickeled specimens were manufactured totally from 1957 until the last one left the factory in 1974. All Second Generation Buntlines, save one, a 16" model, are 12" barreled .45's. According to George Garton, author of Colt's SAA Post-War Models, 72 Second Generation New Frontier 12" Buntlines were produced, as well as three additional nickel plated but engraved standard Buntline Specials.
     
  12. JiroZero713

    JiroZero713 Active Member

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    Not sure either way I think it's an original. It may not be but I think it is.
     
  13. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    An original WHAT? Colt? Appears to be. Might be a copy, but let's assume
    it's a genuine Colt.

    Buntline Special, manufactured between 1957 and 1975? Pretty good chance.

    Late 1800's original example of a long barrelled P model? Nope.

    Third time---What's the serial number?? Colt serial numbers as they relate
    to the year of manufacture are well documented. List the SN. You don't
    have to list all the numbers, X out the last 2 or 3. Be sure to include any
    letters before or after the SN. Let's figure out FOR SURE when this thing
    was made.
     
  14. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

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    Colt is anal retentive about their serial numbers showing the date of manufacture.
     
  15. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

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    Ned Buntline is supposed to have commissioned this weapon in 1876, but the Colt company has no record of receiving the order or making any such weapon. He based its conception on the idea of making a revolver that would be more precise and could be easily modified to work similarly to a rifle. Weapons were produced so that he could give them to the prominent personalities of the Wild West. Wyatt Earp is stated by Lake to have received a Buntline Special, along with four other personalities, including Bat Masterson, but actual evidence of the Earp or other revolvers is in conflict. According to Lake, the four other recipients of the Specials cut their barrels down to the standard 7-1/2" length, but Earp kept his at the original 12" length. By the 1950s, many interested parties had come to regard the legend as totally apocryphal. The revolver was never mass-produced, but could have been specially ordered from the Colt factory in Hartford, Conn. Several such revolvers with 16-inch barrels were displayed at the 1876 Centennial Exposition and over-long barrels were available from Colt at one dollar per inch over 7.5 inches. Company records show no order for the specific weapons nor any orders directed to Ned Buntline. This does not absolutely preclude the historicity of the revolvers. Massad Ayoob writing for Guns Magazine cited notes by Josie Earp where-in she mentions an extra long revolver being an Earp favorite. He further cites an order by Tombstone, AZ bartender Buckskin Frank Leslie for a revolver of near-identical description. This order predated the O.K. Corral fight by several months (Ayoob,2007)
     
  16. JiroZero713

    JiroZero713 Active Member

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    He found two numbers on it. It's not an original I bet but it's still a neat find netherless.

    1 0 6 0 S A on the metal underneath the revolver

    And then
    BB 3 1 2 7 on the barrel.
     
  17. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Interesting. The SA after the number indicates that it's a postwar gun.
    SA suffix numbers started in 1956 with 0001SA. 1060 SA would be a
    1956 gun. The odd part is that according to my reference the Buntline
    wasn't made until 1957, and the first one was 12476SA. Have him look
    a little closer at that 1060 number??
     
  18. JiroZero713

    JiroZero713 Active Member

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    He's taking it to someone to confirm. It's an original colt that is for sure. He just has to determine what time period it came from. Either they Earp TV show days...or the Real Earp days.
     
  19. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    It is a Colt but not from the 1870's. On early guns the rampant pony is smaller and inside a circle. Serial number 1060SA dates to 1957. Still a good piece.
     
  20. BillM

    BillM Active Member Supporter

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    Please let us know how it comes out. I'm kinda curious about that
    1060SA Serial number. Doesn't quite match up with my reference
    book on Colts. Given the markings I'm betting on Earp TV show.