black powder pistol

Discussion in 'Blackpowder & Musket' started by liftedtrucks4me, Apr 20, 2010.

  1. liftedtrucks4me

    liftedtrucks4me New Member

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    My girl just bought me a black powder revolver. She hasn't gotten it yet but it's a matter of days. My question is how are these things loaded? is it like a muzzle loader where I have to put the powder, wadding paper and bullet in it or is there a easier way to do that?
     
  2. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    Never done it but found this

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSOo-zY0_lc]YouTube - Loading and Shooting a Black Powder Revolver[/ame]

    I didn't see him put any grease over the ball on each charge in the cylinder. Wouldn't that risk cross ignition of adjacent charges in the cylinder?
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2010

  3. saviorslegacy

    saviorslegacy New Member

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    Be careful, these things can chain fire, and that means bad news for you.
    If you do not know what a chain fire is then I will tell you. "It is where hot lead and powder go from one chamber into another and in a few moments a few if not all of your barrels are fired all at once."

    Now to prevent this you can do a couple of things:
    #1 Use pre-greased rounds.
    #2 Use wads to seal the the powder from the ball.
    You can make your own by using a cut up t-shirt and greasing them with crisco.
    #3 Use over sized balls (.454).
    #4 Put grease on top of the balls.

    Other than that just make sure that the powder measurement is accurate and all.

    ps Sorry if some of what I said was redundant....
    Also, if anyone sees anything that is wrong please correct me, I am still greener than grass.
     
  4. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Balls are oversize to provide a tight fit in the chamber. It's usually best to either use a lubed wad under the ball or vegetable based lube over them. The lube will help keep fouling soft and prevent chainfire.
     
  5. liftedtrucks4me

    liftedtrucks4me New Member

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    so with each reload i would have to measure the powder and pour it in, pushin the lubed cloth in and then jam in the ball. I'm sure they make fast reloads for a black powder pistol to where you don't spend 10 minutes reloading each cylinder
     
  6. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    Go buy and read the Lyman's Black Powder Handbook.

    Do more on-line research. There are plenty of articles and U-Tube videos (such as the one posted above) that are useful to BP newbies.

    DON'T try to shoot the BP pistol, until you have educated yourself and can do this safely. READ the instructions that come with the pistol.

    Learn about cleaning BP pistols. HOT water and BoreButter are your friends!

    BP Pistols are not hard to shoot and clean, it is not dangerous (if done properly) and they are LOADS of fun. But be careful, know what you are doing BEFORE you do it!

    Don't cut up T-shirts and soak them in Crisco. Buy "revolver wads", these are lubricated felt wads that you place over the powder and under the ball.

    Use "real" Black Powder if you can fffG (3fG), BP substitutes will work, but aren't as much fun!

    Once you get your pistol and do some more learning, post back with any specific questions.
     
  7. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    I use small (2 dram) glass vials and pre-measure the charges into them before I go shoot. This makes the loading process go a lot quicker. If/When you decide you really want to get seriously into BP pistols you can find these vials on-line. Just Google "glass vials".

    A loading stand will also help. You can find these on-line at at Dixie Gun Works (An excellent source for all of your BP shooting needs). If you have a Remington 1858 replica, you can also opt for a cylinder loading press.

    With experience (and the right tools) you can load all six cylinder chambers in 2-3 minutes.
     
  8. saviorslegacy

    saviorslegacy New Member

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    Well I'm happy that someone adressed the t-shirt issue. I kinda felt like I was hanging in my thread. thanks
    I guess you could make paper cartridges with already measured powder and everything to help speed up the reloading process. You can also have a spare cylinder ready.
     
  9. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Prelubed wads are the least messy or you can make grease pills out of crisco and beeswax to put under the balls in lieu of wads. Paper cartridges are a viable option for the range and tea bags make excellent cartridges with no need to tear them open before loading or prick them afterward. However they are time consuming to make. If you want fast paced shooting get a modern revolver. BTW Pyrodex is just as much fun as real bp, especially when it's all you can get. :D
     
  10. Search13

    Search13 New Member

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    I just fired my first (inherited) black powder revolvers.
    They really are a lot of fun. I fired a 36 cal and a 44 cal 1851 Old Navy Replicas.

    I put in my time with the books and web searches prior to firing either one of these. The Lyman 45th Edition Reloading Manual has some good information on loading black powder revolvers. Yeah, I know its old. It came with the lot. I also have the 49th.

    It was surprising to read the differing beliefs about loading procedures. Some say use grease, some say to use lubricated wads. I read in one book that the writer didnt believe in using either of these. If you were to think back to the day when these pistols were used in battle, doesnt it make you wonder if the soldiers took the time with patches, wads or grease?

    Here is how I did it and I still have all my fingers.
    Measure and pour your powder charge and load each cylinder.
    Place and ram each lead ball down with consistent pressure to seat ball.
    I then placed a glop of Bore Butter into each cylinder on top of the lead ball and smeared off the excess.
    Place a percussion cap # 11 on each nipple.
    Cock the hammer and fire.

    Its a blast !!!

    Joe
     
  11. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Something else to remember: NEVER NEVER NEVER use smokless powder in place of black powder or Pyrodex. I saw a .50 in-line with a blown barrel from some yahoo using smokless powder. He used a black powder charge also .. Blew the barrel in half length wise. You might be able to google search for the pics.

    Not for the sqeemish..
     
  12. patret

    patret New Member

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    I have a 1858 remington pistol that uses number 10 caps which are hard to find. Lee makes a conocial bullet mold with a band around it that has to be shaved when seating the bullet into the cylinder. Always shave your round balls when seating them. Purchase a round ball that is about 4 hundreds to large so you can shave it when seating the bullet. Always reduce your recommended powder charge if you have a brass frame pistol. I have to clean the cylinder pin after 18 rounds because it wont cock. That means a q-tip is necessary.

    patret
     
  13. gocritter

    gocritter New Member

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    Yup, and then you have to put a precusion cap on each nipple. These are not "fill the air with lead revolvers" it's the enjoyment of the task.
    And then you get to clean the thing which is about a 30 min. adventure which MUST be done directly after shooting or within a short time you have rusted junk.
    The best part is that black powder shooting can become very addictive as it is great fun.
     
  14. MRFranks

    MRFranks New Member

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    ARGH! Here be as fine as any pistol as made yon...the Lyman Plains Pistol.54. Me thinks it'll knock a lubber down, before me dispatchin' hisself with me big knife...
     

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  15. sea_goin_dude

    sea_goin_dude New Member

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  16. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    From one who's been shooting bp for 42 years I have to disagree with both those statements. Cleaning a bp revolver is not a 30 minute chore unless you're using smokeless lubes or any petroleum based lubes in the bore or chambers. It is not necessary to do a complete teardown after each shooting session. I only tear mine down once a year or so. I sometimes let mine go two or three days before cleaning and I use Pyrodex which has a worse reputation for causing rust and corrosion than real bp does. I have also gone as long as nine days without cleaning one with no signs of rust or corrosion.
     
  17. sea_goin_dude

    sea_goin_dude New Member

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    I have also gone as long as nine days without cleaning one with no signs of rust or corrosion.[/QUOTE]

    I can't agree with that as I would never leave my BP weapons even overnight with cleaning. Once I did leave my 58 cal overnight and normal cleaning next day wouldn't remove the "stain" from the chamber. I did use x fine valve compound on a swab to remove this stain after repeated strokes with the swab. No I'd never leave any of my weapons without cleaning immediately after a day of shooting. It's up to each of us as to how we want to keep/preserve our expensive weapons. I paid too much for mine to take a chance with possible damage, however slight, it may be, as this slight, hard to see damage will collect over time and might become more than we can correct with delayed cleaning.

    Just my 2cents worth :D
     
  18. Theunsb

    Theunsb New Member

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    They are true fun and cure one's flinch in no time.:D
    They are real pieces of art.;)
    And they are accurate.:D
     
  19. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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  20. tiberius10721

    tiberius10721 New Member

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    My load is 35 grains of fffg black powder ,cornmeal as a filler, .454 lead ball and crisco spread on top of the ball to prevent chain fires. I have used a chronograph with this load and averaged about 925fps. with great accuracy.