Bipod Length

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Sibil, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. Sibil

    Sibil New Member

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    How long should be the length of the legs of the bipod to be shoot from prone position? I bought a harris bipod with 6" to 9" for benchrest but I want to know if I can use it too for prone position.
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Depends on the stock, may be a smidge long. If so, take a garden trowel with you. make a couple of holes a few inches deep.
     
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  3. tacticalfun

    tacticalfun Active Member

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    I have a harris 6-9 that i bench rest with. Its always to short for close targets and to long to reach out and touch anything. I always bring a 5' and 10" sand bag set with me

    ForumRunner_20121028_213134.jpg
     
  4. Fathead00

    Fathead00 New Member

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    WTF is that scope on there? It's almost as long as the stock.;)
     
  5. tacticalfun

    tacticalfun Active Member

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    Lol. 6-22x55 mm made in england.
     
  6. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    I don`t know, how long should they be ?
     

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  7. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    I have a 9-13" for prone shooting and a 13-27" for hunting.
     
  8. Intheshop

    Intheshop New Member

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    Am NOT bustin on Harris's,or any bi-pod.......we have and use the heck out of them.

    But have come to rely on home-brew'd shootin sticks WAY more in the field.They just seem to work better for me.And thats a big point.....didn't get here without lots of use with factory bi-pods.We build our sticks with old aluminum arrows.....to the point(ha),of leaving the field tips in them.They really dig into the ground.Obviously we lose the fletching.....then about 4 or 5 inches down we tie them together with a bunch of overlapping(shoe lace style),loops of medium wieght string.How tight you wrap correlates to the "hinge" stiffness.Slip the appropriate size surgical tubing over the section above lacing.All this takes way longer to type than to actually do it.

    They're "better"(again,YMMV)...because they're not attached.When used on a stalking rifle,they either go in a back-pack or you stick one leg under your belt.They get pulled out when you get to your set-up.But whilst you're walking they're out of the way....and don't slow down the rifle when doing running shots.

    How a rifle,"behaves" off Harris's(or any brand)...whilst shooting for groups is a deep subject.And thats not the point of my response.On some set-ups they rival a good fr rest/rr bag.To the point,my shooting range(here at the shop)has a perfect berm for the use of them.My cast bullet rifle gets about equal time between the low Harris's and a full-on BR set-up.
     
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  9. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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  10. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    They should be long enough to reach the ground while you are looking through the scope.:D
     
  11. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Well-Known Member

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    I know this is reaching arm pit deep in to the zombie thread pit. I just don't want to start a new thread on Varmint Al's bi-fur pods like these guys never even mentioned it. I'd just kinda like to add my own experiences with them on to the excellent comments already here on bi pods and especially home made ones, mine all had their origin with Varmin Als design and I've added and modified over the years.

    Here it is set up in a walking stick configuration and I used it as a shooting stick while standing to be steady and still stand to shoot over a little rise between me and the target.
    [​IMG]

    More often I have them set to the bi-pod position such as in this hunting blind.
    [​IMG]

    The things I've modified on Al's basic design is where Al suggests a specific dimension based on how tall you are I believe, I drill several holes 2" apart both above and below his recommended dimension to allow it to be super adjustable to any situation from inside a blind sitting in a lawn chair to sitting on the side of a hill side or even laying on the ground.

    I used wing nuts and stove bolts so it can be changed around quick, even with gloves on and I spaced my holes equally so you can put two bolts through to make it just a 3 or 4 foot mono pod, take a bolt out and it is now a folding bi-pod, or flip it over and put the bolt back through and you have a 5 or 6 foot walking stick and mono pod to shoot from or just to steady binoculars from.

    I also added little tiny eye bolts, one at each end when it is folded to the short mono pod so you can put some para cord on there to pack it on your back or the QD sling swivels from a rifle sling will hook in those as well.

    I drilled holes about an inch deep in the bottom of the "feet" of the bi-pod set up so I can put nails up in those to give a firm stance and other just false holding holes to stow them when not needed. The also have matching holes so if you flip the whole thing to the long position from the bi-pod you can just stick those nails through both lengths to hole it pretty darn firmly in a quick switch to us it as a shooting stick when walking through tall brush.

    I've used these things for years and years now and highly recommend them. When I make them any more I make about 5 sets at a time and just leave them at my most favored hunting spots any more. I've killed all kinds of game shooting off the home made bi-pods from beavers, coyotes, deer, fox, and hundreds of squirrels.

    Cheap, versatile, easy to make, and just making something my self just adds to my satisfaction of any hunt and kill.

    http://www.varmintal.com/abifu.htm
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2019
  12. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Well-Known Member

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    Another thing I'll do for shooting sticks, is about any walking stick I like enough to carry home, I'll drill about a 3/8 or so hole about half way through it and put several of those holes in it about 4-5 inches apart up and down it.

    Then it is simple to cut off a little branch or stick any where with my Leatherman saw or even a knife blade and whittle it to fit those holes. Making a perfect rifle rest right where you need it, any where you sit down. Even in a tree stand with no bar in front, you can still have a solid rifle rest for those long shots.

    I'll also drill a 1/4" hole straight down the top and on each side at the top, to screw in a home made camera mount to steady a dim light pic or improve a selfie in front of a fresh kill. I make a lot of these camera mounts with hardware store eye bolts and just started using them to mount my regular camera to a walking stick when I want a long selfie stick.
     
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  13. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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  14. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yep! A 7 year old thread. :):):):)
     
  15. Jack Ryan

    Jack Ryan Well-Known Member

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    Well I did search for it. LOL
     
  16. rustycrusty

    rustycrusty Member

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    I guess for prone it depends on whether you like like Twiggy or DOLLY!
     
  17. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    I found bi-pods only really work if your sitting static, and then you can fuss with it to get comfortable.

    The problem is 90% of the type shooting I do involves hunting.
    In most cases at least here, bi-pods are not flexable enough for the movement of game.
    That requires the compromise of range, type of game and after the first shot the possibility of a second follow-up shot is rather low using a bi-pod unless your using belt fed weapons.
    But for potting a jinking Alaskan fox?
    Itd be a shooting stick.
    At one time I had some noname chinese bipod on a .22 that extended out to about 20" it made for a very uncomfortable sitting position, in the end I traded it off and stuck with a shoiter sling setup.
     
  18. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have tried bipods on occasion, but for my style of shooting, I find the shooting bags just seem to work much better for my style of shooting from a bench.

    personal preference. some people like them, some don't. they have their uses for some.