Best way to store for Home Defense?

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by ineedagoodername, Dec 30, 2011.

  1. ineedagoodername

    ineedagoodername New Member

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    I just got a Ruger SR9. I plan to keep it locked up in a lower shelf of a sturdy gun rack I made that hangs on our bedroom wall. It's a key lock and the key is fairly well hid but easy to grab nearby.

    I'm going to do my best to get my wife and teenage daughters to understand and feel good with this gun. I work nights and think it's time with all the pill/ meth zombies around here.

    HOW SHOULD I HAVE THIS GUN READY?
    I'm not sure. I don't want to leave it cocked ready for months at a time if it's hard on the gun.

    HOW do you store ,but have ready a semi? I want to make it simple and as fast as possible for my wife. She will already have to unlock the gun rack so I am worried about time.

    I guess I'm asking: Will it be bad for the gun to store it cocked and ready except the thumb safety to store?

    THANKS
     
  2. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    To put this one to rest, you have to understand creep. Creep is the slow flow of a non-ferric metal like copper, brass and lead under force. At temperatures outside of a furnace, steel doesn't have any appreciable creep. Under most conditions, steel flexes and then returns to its original shape. When pushed past its elastic limit, steel will bend and not return to its original shape. All designers of well-made magazines make sure the spring never approaches the elastic limit when the magazine is fully loaded. Honest. This means the spring will not weaken when the magazine is fully loaded -- not even over an extended time. Like 50 years. American Handgunner recently ran a story about a magazine full of .45 ACP that had been sitting since WWII and it ran just fine on the first try. So there you go.

    This applies to springs in general.

    Magazine spring madness: 'creep' to your 'elastic limit' to un-earth the urban legend of 'spring-set' | American Handgunner | Find Articles


    To "store" a home defense weapon at all is putting yourself in the position of having an intruder wait until you get the gun to complete his assault. I got $5 that says if your wife is washing dishes, and some guy kicks in the front door, he's gonna be between your wife and your gun. Then what? If you feel the need to own a firearm for protection, then it needs to be on you unless you're sleeping, then it needs to be within arms reach. If there's kids involved, educate 'em, but provide for instant access if the gun is needed.
     

  3. ineedagoodername

    ineedagoodername New Member

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    Ok. well any info about springs/ mags is is very helpful. Thanks very much.
    Right now It's just me ,my wife & 19 & 16 year old girls so you are right!!!

    What I am thinking though is kinda in the future. I'm sure to have some grandkids running around here someday(I hope atleast 5years!) so I just could not have a gun loose anywhere.

    I also sometimes have relatives here (kids) so I just can't let the wife keep it under her pillow! If I trusted my wife 100% to lock it up every morning I'd say ok, but who really dose trust their wife with a gun??:eek:
     
  4. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    As a family, take a personal protection class. All of you will benefit.

    Any place you keep a personal protection firearm locked up, also denies you instant access in an emergency. That's your call. We have grand kids from 8 yrs old to 15 years old. All the guns except the two being carried , are locked up. All of the kids have been educated, and pose us no concerns of them accessing the guns, unsupervised.

    No disrespect, but nobody that you can't trust 100% with firearms, should have unsupervised access to them.
     
  5. JohnJak

    JohnJak New Member

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    Carry on your person and the worry will be over. If your worried that your family will not have access to it send them for some training.
     
  6. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

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    All really good points. Take the kids to a gun safety class, let them shoot. If my gun is not on me, it's loaded and sitting right next to me. My firearm gets locked in the safe when I leave, my wife has one or two of her own that are out. Remember, an unloaded firearm is an awkward rock. Be smart about who's in the house. Keep in mind teenagers are stupid in nature, and will do really stupid things. It's a tough age for them... and tougher for their parents.
     
  7. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    To leave the pistol without a round in the chamber is as good as committing suicide if an intruder kicks the door in as Jay explained. Keeping it locked up is the same. Education of the family is what you must do. And also be aware of the presence of visitors and family safety when they come to visit. If you are having a family Christmas Dinner with a lot of little bread crunchers and guests in the house you should use added precaution by placing the piece somewhere concealed and out of reach. Another issue to consider for you and the family, is that in critical situation fine motor skills like using your hands and fingers to perform a function like unlocking a lock or pulling the slide back just doesn't work! There is a good chance they will not be able to pull the slide back or will forget to pull the slide back. From experience Old Murphy is alive and well! :rolleyes:
    Maybe in the future you can get another weapon so you have one accessible in another area of the house so the attacker would never be between you or your family's defense weapon. You would always have one direction to go obtain one.
    For example besides a pistol I have a Double Barrel Hammer Shotgun hanging over the mantel should someone late one night when I am in my PJs sipping my Gentleman Jack and watching TV kick a door in. Some may think that we giving this advise are paranoid! But in the times we live it is simple! We are not at all paranoid we are prepared! You must be prepared and train yourself and your family ahead of time should something like that happen. There are only two possible results to this issue. YOU and FAMILY ARE SURVIVORS or YOU and THE FAMILY ARE VICTIMS and hopefully not a STATISTIC! Take them shooting so they become very familiar with the operation, function and gain proficiency and so it becomes second nature. One or two time to the range will not accomplish this. You are developing muscle memory which will help all to survive if the worst should ever happen.
    SORRY FORGOT SOMETHING! When you go to the Range always wear safety glasses and ear protection muffs! The bone around your ears can absorb sound. So muffs are recommended and especialy for new shooters!

    03
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Training is the key. If you dont trust your wife why did ya marry her?? ;)

    Anyway if we have friends with kids over guns get locked up or unloaded except the one i carry the wife doesnt like carrying one. My wife has a 9mm and ar15 out i just unload those. My policy is if someone comes to visit that then complains i got my gun on my belt around their kids they can go some visit someone else...
     
  9. WilliamTF

    WilliamTF New Member

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    Other than some scraps and altercations most when I was younger the only things that I can think that might compare are (don't know if your a hunter) bowhunting , when a nice buck walks in on you instantly your heartrate skyrockets you begin to tremble slightly you have to conciously measure your breathing. And the months of practice prior pay off if everything goes right . Or if you've ever played sports and its up to you to make a decisive play. Those are moments when pride and bragging rights are on the line. I can't imagine if my families LIFE were on the line , I wouldn't have the ability let alone maybe the time for anything but pick up maybe switch to fire and pull the trigger. I was broken in with a healthy respect for firearms to say the least and that's how I'm raising my family. Something to maybe consider
     
  10. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Yeah, yanno, kids have a magical knack for

    finding loaded guns, for one thing.

    If it's carried, it's always available, be it

    in the john, backyard, whatever.
     
  11. lisasam67

    lisasam67 New Member

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    I have my LC9 in a combination safe. Four buttons on top. You set the combo. Easy to open in the dark!
     
  12. ineedagoodername

    ineedagoodername New Member

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    Well I guess I do agree with everyone of you. Those are all the points I've had bouncing around in my head.

    I grew up around guns and hunting so a rifle or shotgun feels natural to me. I'm taking the wife & my girls out and I'm going to take it slow and make sure we all feel comfortable with this pistol. My range is the back yard. I'm going to make sure they all know as much as possible about it.
    I was even planning to put the wife through the drills of unlocking the gun rack in the dark! I do agree that under stress it all may be a waste of time. I'm pretty far from a perfect plan here.

    After some training with the SR9 I'll trust MY family just fine. We just have some wild youngsters in the family that stop in times and I do not trust them.

    I know my wife's not going to wear it so I guess I would change the plan if I can figure out a very good but easy to get to hiding spot back in our bedroom. If someone knocked in the front or back door ,running to our bedroom makes sence because it's the furthest point away.

    Again I work evenings & nights. 5-6pm till anywhere from midnight till 6am so that's some bad hours to be leaving the family alone. I got this gun for them so I'm just trying to work out the smartest plan here.

    I don't know, I may even end up going back to our old plan which was a unloaded singleshot 12ga in the gun rack and 3 shells in the dress next to it. I have an elastic strip stapled to hold 3 shells in top draw, but up Underneath the top of the dresser if that makes sence? pretty well hid but easy to grab fast.
     
  13. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Accessibility to a firearm is a serious decision that each person has to make on their own. With children in the house, if you make the wrong decision the consequences could be catastrophic.

    From the time my children were 10 years old or there abouts, they knew that there was always a loaded shotgun beside my bed. They knew it was there, they knew it would kill and they knew to stay the hell away from it. Actually, my bedroom has always been, more or less, off-limits to my kids. They respected that, and as adults, they still do. My daughter never took an interest in firearms, but by 12 years old, my son was reasonably proficient in handling firearms. My boy was mature enough to not "need" to play with guns. Many times I would send him to the house to fetch a gun for me. It worked out well, he will be thirty this year and damn if he aint shot himself or anyone else yet.

    I live in an area where policing is so thin, that all the cops do is supervise the cleaning up of someone's mess. It is not the cops fault, the county I live in is dirt poor and can't afford more cops. Because it is poor, it also has one of the highest crime rates in the state. I know that I, and my wife, are responsible for our own defence. Unloaded, or locked guns are not a part of my security system.
     
  14. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    Respectfully.... try this:

    You on the couch watching TV, your wife and one daughter standing outside the unlocked front door. (time to open the unlocked door approximates time to kick the door in)

    Have your other daughter holler go... you run for the shotgun, load it (WITH DUMMY SHELLS) while your wife and daughter run for you.... see who gets where, first.....
     
  15. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Metal springs weaken (eventually) through repeated flexing, not static compression. Your ability will likely degrade before the springs will. May I suggest short monthly skill maintenance, after some degree of proficiency has been obtained? You have a backyard range.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
  16. undumb

    undumb New Member

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    First: get a dog! He/she is always ready.
    Second: get a revolver. With all the things that can possibly go wrong with a semi-auto ( failure to fire, jams...) putting one in the hands of an inexperienced, frightened person is a recipe for disaster.
     
  17. ineedagoodername

    ineedagoodername New Member

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    Well I've got some thinking to do is all I can say right now.

    Anybody have any good Ideas/Tips about how you have yours out & ready but hid well? Maybe there's some kind of clever box out there I can buy or make? I'm thinking like asprin bottle here. So easy (& Fast) to open but atleast would keep a kid up to maybe the age of 4 or 5 out.

    I just got this SR9 this week. Hopefully I'll get a chance before dark today to fire a few rounds. I'd hate to wait till next year!
     
  18. ineedagoodername

    ineedagoodername New Member

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    Do you have a link to that box? I'll check it out. Thanks
     
  19. undumb

    undumb New Member

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  20. PanBaccha

    PanBaccha New Member

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    When it comes to home defense, and especially during the night hours,
    I couldn't for the life of me lock up my firearms or not have one ready in
    its chamber. In a life and death situation seconds are all you got.
    :eek: