Best way to sight in my rifle

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by jersh243, Nov 5, 2013.

  1. jersh243

    jersh243 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    What do y'all think is the best way to sight in a rifle?
     
  2. kaido

    kaido New Member

    1,743
    0
    0
    Prepare for smart *** remark:


    Go to the range, set up a target at wanted distance, load rifle, fire a few rounds, adjust site.



    Normal remark:


    It'd probably be best to use a set of sand bags to get it sighted in, they'll help hold the rifle stable better and eliminate some of the human error from the process......a lead sled would work best.
     

  3. jersh243

    jersh243 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    Thank you! For both the smart a** remark and the normal one, both were very helpful!
     
  4. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American Supporter

    1,972
    286
    83
    Iron or optic sight?
    What caliber and what range do expect to shoot at?
     
  5. jersh243

    jersh243 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    Scope, 243 win. and under 100 yards I'm using it for deer hunting
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2013
  6. jersh243

    jersh243 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    Also is it important to use the same grain ammo? Sorry for the noob question I'm new at this.
     
  7. kaido

    kaido New Member

    1,743
    0
    0
    If all your doing is shooting paper, it isn't AS important since a miss there will just mean you missed. If you're going to be hunting and you zero with xxxgr from such and such a manufacturer, then make sure when you leave for your hint, you've got the ammunition.

    The reason behind this is that each bullet will shoot a little differently out of each gun. Bullet A might hit dead on but bullet B could hit a 1/4" left and low while bullet B might hit four inches high and to the right, even if all three bullets are of the same weight.
     
  8. jersh243

    jersh243 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    Thank you!
     
  9. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

    10,198
    0
    0
    When I zero in my scoped rifles. I fire three shot groups, then check/measure the distance the group is from the bullseye. I adjust the scope accordingly and repeat until its on target.

    If the scope is way off (as in not even hitting paper), I may start at a close distance such as 25-50 yards until it is mostly on target, then move it to 100 yards to zero it in where I want it.
     
  10. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    personally i like using a boresighter. saves a lot in ammo. will most definately get you on paper. then just adjust as needed.

    what ever ammo you want to hunt with, is the ammo i would sight in for. same brand and weight.
     
  11. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    6,927
    66
    48
    If you freshly mounted a new scope. I usually start at 25 yds and get it sighted there before moving on to 100 yds. Remember at 25 yards any scope adjustment will require 4 times as many clicks as what is called for at 100 yds.

    As you were already told, you should do your final sighting in with the ammo you plan to hung with. You can use a different, cheaper load to get you on paper and close to the bullseye first though.

    If you plan on keeping your hunting shots inside of 100 yds, then dead on at 100 is good. Anything closer should hit no lower than the distance between the center of your bore and the height of the center of the scope.
     
  12. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    6,927
    66
    48
    Oh and my smartie pants remark would be:
    You should sight your rifle in so that it hits what you're aiming at.
     
  13. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

    10,198
    0
    0
    ^^^ And yes, try to use the same ammo you hunt with when you finalize your zero. I'd use whatever cheaper ammo I had and zero the scope with that first, then use your hunting ammo to get the scope zeroed for that round. It would probably save your some $$$$ since you wouldn't use as much hunting ammo.
     
  14. phideaux

    phideaux Active Member Supporter

    777
    154
    43
    Assuming it is a Bolt Action rifle.
    Assuming you dont have a boresighter.

    Place the rifle on a fixed stand(sand bag, etc)remove the bolt . now you can see thru the barrel.
    Looking thru the barrel align it to center of target, then adjust scope crosshairs to the same bullseye ,that you see thru barrel.
    looking thru barrel and scope ,now, both are set at same spot.
    Then replace the bolt and try a shot. Then fine tune scope to hit center.
    This will save ammo.


    Jim
     
  15. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

    9,788
    272
    83
    Being frugal, I will shoot one shot at 25-30 yards, make an extreme adjustment, then repeat until I'm at zero. This usually takes 2-3 shots. Then I move out to 100 and fine tune. Imo, a three shot group at 25 yards with a centerfire is a waste of ammo.
     
  16. jersh243

    jersh243 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    Heading out right now to sight in my rifle wish me luck
     
  17. jersh243

    jersh243 New Member

    58
    0
    0
    Got my gun sighted in!! Wasn't nearly as hard as I thought it would be only took five shots!! Thanks for all the help!
     
  18. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

    9,788
    272
    83
    So what process did you use? Bore sight, then my frugal method?
     
  19. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

    7,715
    197
    63
    Jersh,

    Give you a couple of easy pointers. I am assuming it is a bolt gun due to the caliber. Of course they do make them in semi also. So assuming it is a bolt gun and you do not have a bore sighter as AXXE advised. Here is something I have done for years when I get a new rifle and mount the scope to take the place of a bore sighter or waisting a lot of ammunition getting it close on paper to start with. First of all wait until night and fix your self a good rest on a table for example. If there is a street light say 100 yards or more away take the bolt out and look through the bore and move your eye around in a circle looking through the bore. You should be able to tell when the glare of the light is seen in the middle. Try to hold the rifle still and adjust the Scope in on the light then repeat until you feel both are centered the bore and the crosshairs. If you do not use the light technique start off your zero attempt at 25 yards from a good reast! At 25 Draw a Cross 3" below dead center of the target. You should focus on the center of the targer and the rounds should hit the Cross 3"s below! When you are close to zero at 25 yards. (At 25 yards each adjustment will only move your point of impact 1/16 inch. Otherwise 16 adjustments per inch of impact movement!) As mentioned go to 50 yards shooting from a good rest and make adjustments. Until on at 50 yards. (At 50 yads remember each adjustment will only move the point of impact 1/8 inch.) Most scopes are 1/4 MOA = 1/4 inch adjustments for each click or 4 adjustments for 1" point of impact change at 100 yards. Then repeat at 100 Yards. At 100 yards it will take 4 adjustments to move the point of impact 1 in. And finally zero the rifle with the ammunition you are going to be using. Changing ammunition will change the point of impact. Also ammunition boxes have the LOT Number Stamped on the box. Try to buy boxes of ammunition with the same lot number on them when you start. What I am saying look at the lot number on the shelf when you purchase it. And find enough with the same lot number on it to sight your rifle in as well as have enough to use for hunting. It is ok to buy other ammunition to target practice with but save the stuff you zeroed with. And do not change your scope for the practice ammunition.
    Good luck and no stupid questions here!

    03
     
  20. wittmeba

    wittmeba New Member

    1,097
    1
    0
    I would suggest this. It doesn't matter if you have a scope or open sights.

    If open sights learn what they should look like when on target and always align exactly the same every time. Some use open sights a little differently than others. Nothing matters but your own technique.

    With a scope you have cross hairs so that is a no-brainer.

    Set your target at the distance you want.
    Make an adjustment (sometimes just a guess as to how much) after each shot and only make adjustments in either the vertical or horizontal direction until you are precisely online with the bullseye. Don't try to do both directions at the same time.

    Then make the adjustment on the other axis and repeat the routine. Eventually you should have both and hit a bullseye.

    I did this with a Remington Model 66 .22 LR with open sites. It worked great.

    I set the target at 100 yards. First shot was 5" low and 5" left. I made the adjustment on the vertical and improved by about 2½". Third show was right online horizontally. Repeated for the vertical location. Same results - Fourth shot 2½" left. Fifth shot was a bullseye. I was using sandbags for stability.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2013