Best virgin rifle brass

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by fa35jsf, Oct 29, 2013.

  1. fa35jsf

    fa35jsf New Member

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    I want to work up some highly accurate loads for my 270 win and already have all my other components selected, however I do not have any virgin brass. I want to use new brass because my once fired stuff is of various brands, mostly very cheap stuff.

    So what brand provides the most accurate new brass cases? Also, where do you find your brass cause most sites I see are sold out.
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Lapua and a-square.

    Both are normally in stock because they aren't cheap, but they are the best.
     

  3. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    That is why I never got into reloading. Components are always sold out. Some bullets cost as much as factory ammo. If you want to reload HP pistol ammo you can save a little money.
     
  4. sandog

    sandog Member

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    Lapua for sure. Check out Nosler brass as well.
     
  5. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    Last edited: Oct 29, 2013
  6. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    What is a highly accurate .270 load? The .270 is a practical game cartridge not a bench rest round. Any new brass properly manicured and annealed regularly should work just fine.:)
     
  7. fa35jsf

    fa35jsf New Member

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    Maybe I should have clarified what I meant be "accurate". What I am looking to do is play around with powder charge to find the best grouping. I have shot many different brands and types through my rifle and some group well, others not so well. My rifle is not a bench rest gun but rather my deer rifle, however I still want the best grouping I can get.

    Has anyone had any experience with Hornady brass?

    Also, thank you for any links because reloading components are hard to find in stock. Thanks for the links already posted.
     
  8. mseric

    mseric New Member

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    I shoot, load and hunt with a lot of different rifles. Some get the high dollar Lapua/Norma brass, some get the Win/Rem stuff. I make em all work. Load development and range time is all it takes.

    Brass can be important, or not. For accuracy it's best to stick with one headstamp. Mixing headstamps is fine for semi-auto pistol shooting, but for precision rifle not so much, it should all be the same. Whatever "same" you choose, it will work. Good Luck!
     
  9. ShagNasty1001

    ShagNasty1001 New Member

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    I used Hornady in my .308 before I had a bunch of saved up used brass. It works fairly well but I'm no expert in brass or reloading
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Some bullets can be pricier. But the quality of such bullets is phenominal. Saying the high end unloaded bullets aren't worth it because you can get tula steel cased rounds for less is like saying a corvette sucks because I can get a yugo for less....

    You have to compare high to high end.

    What's more realistic is I shoot a lot of 45-70 it costs about 50$ for off the shelf box of 20. I can make the exact same bullet in lots of 50 for about 29$. All other rounds are the same general price diff compairing same to same. With some rounds like the 458 win mag which i shoot a lot the difference is even more enormous. Box of 20 factory runs about 95-125$, reloads run me about 15$ per 20.

    If I bought shelf ammo I might get to shoot that rifle two or three times a year at best
     
  11. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i use Hornady and Norma brass for my most accurate loads. is it better than my Winchester or Remington brass? possibly. IMO, i feel the costlier brass is made more consistent and more uniform.

    one thing that i think too, is that the brass, whether it's new or once fired, that after the first time it's shot in your rifle, it takes the individual shape of your chamber.

    another thing i do is to try and stay away from the maximum powder charges as much as possible, as i feel they stretch the cases, and not always is faster more accurate. i really don't try for the fast loads, but am looking for the most accurate load. some of my cases, have gone about 10 reloads with only minor trimming.
     
  12. fa35jsf

    fa35jsf New Member

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    Thanks. That is kind of what I want to do, fire form to my rifle after my first load. I still need to get a neck only sizing die though. Maybe christmas.

    I have been trying to do some research on the different brands and how concentric the neck is and all. It seems as though Winchester and Remington are towards the bottom with their quality control, AT LEAST AS FAR AS THE REVIEWS STATE.
     
  13. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Just about any brass can be made to shoot VERY well. Sorting by case weight, deburring the flash holes, uniforming the primer pockets, turning the case necks, etc. Aneal the case necks every 3rd or 4th loading to make the brass last longer. You will undoubtedly be able to extract amazing accuracy by just prepping and sorting the brass.
     
  14. sandog

    sandog Member

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    I have used Winchester brass for years, in several rifle and handgun calibers, and find it to be very good. But it requires a lot of prep work. I resize, chamfer the mouths, debur the primer pockets, and trim to the same length. Most of the Starline brass I've bought needs less prep work. Recently bought some Nosler .308 brass, and while it is more pricey, ( $50 for 50 pieces of brass, as opposed to around $32 per $50 for Winchester), it is fully prepped. trimmed to length,cases weighed, flash holes de burred , etc. I have stayed away Remington brass, thicker walled, but more prone to neck splits than other brands.
     
  15. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The Remington brass tends to be harder than most. A good anealing will fix most of the neck splitting problems. I aneal .243 and resize to .308 and never split a case. I reform .270 into 8mm Mauser and never split a neck.
     
  16. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    I have always used whatever brass I happen to have laying around. I DO separate it by brand into groups but I find that good brass prep work makes more of a difference than the headstamp.

    I load for my 30-06, 7x57 mauser, 8x57 mauser, 300 win mag, 308 win, 303 brit, 7.62x39 Russian and all my pistols as well as the shotgun stuff. Mostly for my older military rifles. These are "hunting" grade guns not bench rifles. Many are either actual sniper weapons or reproductions of them. I do expect them to group well, but most are older than I am. I am realistic about their grouping capabilities.

    With Once fired brass aneal the necks, trim for length, full length size and primer pocket uniform. Then tumble clean. separate by headstamp if you want after this but I've always found the differences very small at this point. Only exception is if you have different case capacities. Weighing cases to group them has always worked better than headstamp separation.

    After the first firing in there new bolt action home I only neck size. For a semi I always full length the ammo. Try it with some of the brass you have and see if it doesn't make a believer out of you. As a note this is "hunting rounds for smallest group" not benchrest. On that most of us let our OCD run wild when it comes to prep.:eek:
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2013
  17. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    First read Robo's advice on using brass. Second, reread Robo's advise on using brass cases.:)
     
  18. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    You're shopping at the wrong places.

    I had plenty until all the idiots started screaming TEOTWAWKI.

    Bullets cost as much as factory ammo? HUH? I can get 22 cal bullets for as little as .16 cents a bullets. Please show me where you can get 223 or 556 ammo for 16 cents a round.


    Normal or nosler would be top 2 for 270. If you want to take 30-06 brass and neck it down to 270 you can use Laupa.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2013