Best shooting position? Breathing techniques?

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by CanadianCanuck, Sep 8, 2015.

  1. CanadianCanuck

    CanadianCanuck New Member

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    Hello everyone! I was just curious how everyone else position's them selves when firing there rifle . I use a bipod and was curious to see if there was any advice on the correct prone position and if there was any breathing techniques to maximize accuracy! I've heard fire when fully exhaled? Let me know! Thanks!
     
  2. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    Take a deeeeep breath in, and slowly exhale, then hold your breath, and pull the trigger. For best bullseye score do it for every shot. A sniper will time his heartbeat, the slower the better.

    For prone shooting, an inline no-drop buttstock makes it easier. You can use a cheek riser. Try a rolled blanket or pillow to prop your upper chest. Whatever makes you comfortable works towards a better score.

    Place the buttpad firm against the shoulder. Find the least recoil-sensitive spot. I try not to place it directly in the joint.

    Added: on the bipod... Useful if the rifle is heavy enough. A lightweight rifle will jump. You are better off pressing the forend into a sandbag, or supporting it manually.

    Below is from a Mosin shoot at 100 yards. Not spectacular but good for an old battle rifle. I did use a pull-on buttpad.
     

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    Last edited: Sep 8, 2015

  3. Seargent_York

    Seargent_York New Member

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    breathe easy and steady, squeeze (not pull) the trigger slowly, the shot should almost surprise you as you are not tensed up in anticipation of recoil, but concentrating soley on sights/cross hairs.....


    works great for target shooting, harder to stay calm when looking at that big buck........
     
  4. CanadianCanuck

    CanadianCanuck New Member

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    I use a savage axis .243 . You think that's too light? I may have to pick up a bag and try that and see if I fend better. I've been shooting at 50 yards to try to dial the gun in but my grouping is decent but all about 1 inch or so to the right, so I figured the gun needs to be adjusted . I'm not 100% on sighting the gun in. That would be my windage adjustment? I know your suppose to sight the rifle in at 25 yards . And the dial I need to be adjusting is the on right side of the scope, just not sure which direction I should be turning etc. my manual says each click is a quarter of an inch if I remember correctly .
     
  5. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

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    Not sure why 25 yards, I think you should sight it in for the most likely or favored distance. It really depends on the scope first, and the ammo second.

    The Axis is a lightweight hunting rifle. I think you will do better from a sandbag or even from the kneeling position than from a bipod.
     
  6. CanadianCanuck

    CanadianCanuck New Member

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    Oh a buddy who has a lot of experience with this stuff told me, but I guess everyone has a different way lol. Il try that! Il have to get a bag.
     
  7. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The best by far is standing, off hand.

    when you can consistently hit your target from the off hand position, you can hit it from any position.
     
  8. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    True, if you can drive a standard (hand shaker) transmission you can drive an automatic!!!:D
    But I have, for hunting purposes, went to the seated position, supported if possible, because in most hunting situations due to terrain and vegetation, the prone position is not practical. ;)
    As for breathing, I breath normal for several breaths than partially exhale and stop and start my trigger action, the exception is shooting at a moving target.
    To me the most important factor is having a 'good' trigger. I prefer a 2 1/2 lb with not creep and a crisp 'break' and very little over travel. Once you get use to a 'good' trigger any one over 4 lbs will aggravate the hell out of you, not to mention a gritty, long pull on a trigger, mil-spec sucks.:)
     
  9. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The 25 yard think is the starting point only (except for some military applications). Even when I 'bore site' a rifle I fire my first shots a 25 yds and adj to dead on or slightly low (if the sight to bore line distance is more than an 1 1/4) and then you will be 'on the paper' at 100 yds.:)
     
  10. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Sorry to advise 25 yards is not the accurate distance to sight a rifle in. Unless for example you are just plinking with a 22 for fun! If you sight the rifle in for 100 yards it will be hitting low at 25 yards. Depending on how high the scope reticle or optic is compared to the bore that is how low it will hit at 25. This due to the line of sight and line of bore at the 25 yard distance. If sighted in at 25 yards it will be hitting way high at 100 yards! I preferably sight the rifle in at 100 yards. This due to the fact most all ballistics charts regarding bullet drop is figured on either 100 or 200 yard zero.
    The second issue is if you want the tightest group possible you will not do it with a Bi-Pod on the rifle. Although most all sniper rifles have a bi-pod on them and I agree it is a good piece of equipment and should be used on them. But as stated if you are looking for peak accuracy a sand or bean bag and a good bench is best.
    I have been on the long gun for years in the military and also law enforcement. As far as proper breathing it is up to the individuals preference. Some let half the air out and hold before shooting. For me I take in a couple of good breaths if time permits and let it all out right prior to "pressing" the trigger. And you can shoot between heart beats with some practice. Also both feet are flat on the ground with toes of my boots facing outward. Chest slightly raised on right side being right handed, to eliminate any pressure on my chest and upper torso. It works for me! *Here is a three shot group with my standard Remington 700 CDL 7MM Rem Mag hunting rifle at 100 yards zeroed for *200 yards off the bench and bag. Also for precision shooting a good quality scope is an essential! Other than that "Practice" "Practice" "Practice"!

    03
     

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  11. Seargent_York

    Seargent_York New Member

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    ^^^^ especially true if you hunt.

    I see deer hunters sight in their rifles at the range every October - off of 6 or 7sandbags....and never take a standing shot, a leaning shot, or any of the others you might need while hunting game. It's a different world when you stand up!
     
  12. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Roger that!:D
    The 7 RM I had :( would do that with a 160 gr NP's (hand loads) and shoot 1 inch at 300 yds.:D
     
  13. CanadianCanuck

    CanadianCanuck New Member

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    Thanks guys! I will take this into account! I am using a 100 grain round if that makes a difference. I won't be hunting though. Il try to hone my skill standing and using a bag.
     
  14. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    I like sitting, take a deep breath exhale slightly pause & squeeze !..........Repeat.............
     
  15. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I don't agree with deep breathing, unless you're gasping for air because you just ran to wherever you had to make the shot from. Breathe normally. The "best" breathing technique is the technique that your body naturally uses at rest. Forcing your breathing, like forcing a shot, is counterproductive.

    Similarly, the "best" shooting position is the one that you're most comfortable in, not some contorted position that someone devised to manage recoil for faster follow up shots. The only time this doesn't apply is when recoil management to lessen the time between follow-up shots is required.

    Anything that decreases inconsistent movement of the rifle generally leads to higher precision. Trying to make a hit at 1K whilst holding the rifle with one arm in a standing position is inordinately more difficult than letting Mother Earth support the weight of the rifle and your weight.

    In practical terms, whatever you decide to do, be consistent. Grip the rifle the same way, place your cheek on the stock the same way, pull the trigger the same way, use ammunition from a single lot, and use an optic with accurate adjustments.
     
  16. CanadianCanuck

    CanadianCanuck New Member

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    See it's correctly adjusting I'm having issues with
     
  17. kbd512

    kbd512 Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Assuming you're consistent in your manipulation of your rifle, something I have no idea about because I've never seen you shoot, use a Horus calibration target with your optic. Many, if not most, less expensive optics do not have turret adjustments that track accurately. By that, I mean when you move your .5 MOA turret two clicks on an optic of lesser quality, it won't necessarily cause the reticle to move 1 MOA or 1 inch at 100 yards.

    This adjustment accuracy issue with optics is, more or less, a function of the build and materials quality. The ranges and magnification settings over which the optic functions as intended also affect performance. Note that I made no mention of cost. There are plenty of optics of low to moderate cost and even some high cost optics that, due to adjustment accuracy and other optical quality defects or design characteristics, will never be suitable for long range shooting.

    Here's what you want in an optic for long range shooting (800M+):

    * Accurate windage and elevation adjustments
    * Optical glass that does not distort the image at the highest magnification setting
    * First focal plane reticle
    * Illuminated reticle (for shooting at dawn/dusk or targets that are darkly colored; if you never shoot at dawn or dusk, then you can ignore this requirement)
    * Appropriate magnification for the distances you're shooting at (10X at 200 yards is grossly overpowered for me, but everyone's eyes are different)
    * Nitrogen purged tube (apart from fogging lenses, moisture in the tube will distort the image transmitted)
    * Sun shade over the objective to limit light transmission on a sunny day

    These are optional extras that are nice to have, but should not supplant the primary criteria for optics selection:

    * Variable magnification for shooting at targets at different distances
    * Mil-dot or MOA-dot reticles (rather than adjusting the optic for varying wind conditions, you can adjust your point of aim in a relatively precise way)

    I will assume that you are aware of how shooting in different atmospheric conditions, using different lots of ammo, different temperatures, wind, target elevation relative to your position, canting your rifle, etc all affect shot placement and the adjustments you need to dial in to your optic. If you're not aware of how all of that affects long range shooting, educate yourself.
     
  18. CanadianCanuck

    CanadianCanuck New Member

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    I am aware of the affect that wind and elevation have on the bullet, yea it's just a basic bushnell scope that came with the rifle. For the windage adjustment, does turning the dial left move the reticle left? And right for right? I think it said every click was a 1/4"" it's pretty close right now just about an inch right as I'm aiming for the bullseye and There all grouping about an inch right.
     
  19. primer1

    primer1 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A 1/4" movement at 100 yards is only an 1/8" at 50 yards. Think of moving in the correct direction this way, you are moving the crosshairs to the bullet impact. If you are 1" to the right at 50 yards move the windage eight clicks left. The direction you are moving should be labeled under the turret cap.
     
  20. Andreson

    Andreson New Member

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    Just got some important points from here which will definitely helpful for me while gun shooting.
    We just need to be continued the good way to help others. http://www.mybestgunsafe.com/ is a good place of gun safes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2015