Best first handgun

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by dverb92, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. dverb92

    dverb92 New Member

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    Hey guys just joined 5 min ago. I want to learn a good general knowledge of some handguns.
    I'm look for the best possible .40 S&W. I'm not a "know it all" and always open to new information and advice.
    So far I've narrowed it down to these guns:
    cz p09 duty
    Beretta p4x storm
    And of coarse of coarse a glock 22 or open to a glock 20 sf 10mm
    All info appreciated
     
  2. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    First off welcome to the forum second of all glad you like the 40 I recently purchased my first 40 after much searching and decided on the ruger sr40c alot of people will probably tell you 40 is not a good hand gun to learn on though I don't see a problem with it I'm sure someone will give you a reason though. As for the other handguns you have narrowed it down to I have not **** enough to tell you the pros and the cons they are all solid weapons that's for sure though good luck!
     

  3. lbwar15

    lbwar15 New Member

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    People say the .40 isn't good to learn on bc the recoil is a bit snappy.
     
  4. lbwar15

    lbwar15 New Member

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    Only you can make the choice on what is best for you. Those are all grate guns. The XD/XD(M) and Sig are my favorite manufacturers of poly guns. I would also throw S&W M&P in if you have not checked into them yet.

    I for one don't care for the .40. I won't big bullets (.45), a lot of bullets (9mm) or over all powerful bullets (.357sig, 10mm). The .40 produces a lot of pressure for a not so impressive round.

    If you go 10mm that will limit you to glock, EAA, or a 1911. That's about it.
     
  5. 95sniper

    95sniper New Member

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    Also a 9mm is more controllable and ammo is (was) cheaper and common.
     
  6. SigArmored

    SigArmored New Member

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    The best first hand gun you're going to get will be the one that fits you the best.It should point naturally ,and it should feel like an extension of you're arm.Go to you're lgs or a gunshow pick up everything you can take notes as to what you like and then go home and do the research.What works for some dose not work for others.The lighter the pistol the more felt recoil the heavier the pistol generally the more uncomfortable to carry.Single stacks are thin ,double stack not so much.It's all about you what you need and how you intend to use it.
     
  7. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    9mm is still less expensive than .40 cal. None is cheap right now.
     
  8. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    If you are brand new to guns, do more research and attend a firearms safety class.

    If you are currently working with long arms, then get to a handgun safety class.

    I suggest that people look at revolvers (I know that they are not "cool") for their first handgun. Cheaper than semi-autos, but great to learn the basics on. After the basics are down pat, then look at semi-autos.

    But training and safety should be at the top of the list over which brand.
     
  9. JimRau

    JimRau Well-Known Member Supporter

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    First center fire hand gun recombination!
    4 inch barrel S&W K-frame 357 Mag.;)
    You can learn 'basics' with the 38 sp and then go to the 357 Mag if you wish.
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Best first handgun... ruger mk3. Its a gun you can keep for life and never get tired of how fun it is
     
  11. Baxter

    Baxter New Member

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    If you did go with a glock 20(10mm) I would highly recommend getting a drop in conversion barrel. Lone wolf makes them for about $100. Then you could have a 40 as well as a 10mm. A lot of people I know get rid o the g20 because ammo prices, 10mm is not cheap. I would definitely not recommend having just a 10mm as an only gun. Expensive and not as fun to shoot.
     
  12. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I wouldn't recommend 10mm for a person's first gun. People complain that .40 is too snappy and that is 10mm short. The G20sf would be quite a handful for a beginner.
    That said I carry a G20 everyday.
     
  13. 95sniper

    95sniper New Member

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    As others have said go with something 9mm and of you like shooting then you can but bigger calibers as you move along.
     
  14. deadsp0t

    deadsp0t New Member

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    A range that has these models for rent so you can shoot and handle them will help. Also keep maintenance and cleaning in mind as far as ease.
    I started with a G21(.45) and carried it for years fairly comfortably then moved to a G19(9mm) which was an easier gun to own and carry due to ammo(supply and cost) and a slightly smaller frame. I've since moved back to a .45 but in a smaller frame. Do your research and bug your buddies for as much hands on exp as you can get before making a purchase.
     
  15. kirbinster

    kirbinster New Member

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    I just bought a G22 Gen4 as my first gun and love it. I had gone to the range and rented g17,g19 and g23 (they did not have a g22 to rent). If found the g23 no more difficult to handle than the g19. I found that I liked the feel of the g17 better than the g19 even though I don't have really large hands. Small size was not an issue since I live in New "no carry" Jersey. Thus, the G22 was my choice. I have ordered a 9mm conversion barrel for it, but right now I can actually find .40 cal and it is about the same price as 9mm.
     
  16. kiabe1

    kiabe1 New Member

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    I agree about the ruger mk 3 being the best starter handgun but if i were to pick from your list i would pick the cz because their p series is excellent or the px4 because the px series is also excellent and has an external safety which is a must for me
     
  17. dverb92

    dverb92 New Member

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    Thank you guys so much for all the info. Glad to finally see a friendly forum without the usually snappy remark morons on other forums lol.
    I'm not new to guns I've shot many guns but I havnt been of age to carry one with me everyday for protection you know? I just want (like the one guy said) an extension of myself (my arm) I went widow shopping today and I think I found the one. The beretta px4 storm fits me like a glove it felt like it was made for me. With that being said I've never shot it before.. I'm pretty talented naturally I believe, the first time I shot a .40 (2 weeks ago it was a xmd or xdm Springfield) and I hit all 6 glass targets I had set up from roughly 20 yrds consecutively after only 2 beginning shots (is that good??) I was pretty impressed with myself although I don't want to sound too cocky or confident.
     
  18. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I had shot plenty of handguns before I purchased one for myself. The first handgun I purchased for myself I still own it. A Ruger Super Blackhawk chambered in 44 mag with a 7 1/2" barrel. It has served me well over the years. I agree with John a 22 should be everyone's first gun. It took a lot of years for me to realize the value of a 22 LR pistol.

    If I could only have one pistol it would be a 357mag with a 6" barrel. The 357 mag is one of the most versatile rounds on the planet. A revolver with a 6" barrel gets the most out of the 357 cartridge. The 357 mag in a hefty revolver is capable of anything from bagging a bunny 30 feet away to stopping an attacker with a rifle 100 yards away.

    If I had to buy a 40 cal today I would try to find a SA/DA pistol. The SA/DA pistols I prefer are not made in 40 cal.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
  19. Colby

    Colby New Member

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    You sound like a good guy - looking at things in a good way.
    You got a lot of very good advice here already.
    There is a lot more to selecting a gun than most people think - who are not familiar with guns.

    Gun fit in your hand is important - your hand size matters. Some guns grip is too fat for some hands - many times due to "double stack" magazines. You must be able to squarely fit your finger on the trigger without pulling the gun to one side when you pull the trigger. It must just "squeeze" - squarely - no pull of the gun body.

    One basic thing to consider is what you are going to do with it? Is it a gun for the house - a gun for the range (shooting range - practice) - is it a gun for carry? Each of these is different and different guns are better than others for each purpose.
    For a range gun - a heavy caliber gun with a lot of kick is not fun - nor is it cheap to shoot. But remember heavy weight softens the kick.
    A carry gun - especially if you are going to concealed carry (with a state permit) needs to to smaller - lighter - so it can be carry and concealed more easily. Large guns are tough ...
    A house gun - can be just about anything that fits you - heavy - light - most people chose larger/heavier for a house gun - because they are easier to handle - and range practice is easier - because they are heavier and their "kick" is less. Shooting a hard kicking gun at the range gets to be not fun ... And expensive.

    9mm has been an excellent comprise with many people. It's kick is not as bad but it is a respectable powered round - it has also been one of the cheapest cartridges to shoot (not counting the current gun/ammo buying frenzy). It is the U. S. military's primary handgun - the Beretta 92 in 9mm. It has been for close to 25 years. The military calls it the Beretta 9.
    A 22LR is such an excellent gun to practice with at the range - anyone will tell you that - and it is very cheap to shoot - so you can practice a lot - and have a lot of fun. And the Ruger Mark III series is an excellent 22.

    A revolver is an excellent gun for it's simplicity and extreme reliability. You don't have feeding troubles, jamming troubles, clearing of jams. Once a semi-auto jams it is dead - and must be cleared - learning to do. you must seriously learn the jamming potentials of semi-autos - and how to deal with that possibility. Many gun classes spend a good amount of time on this subject.
    Take a class - with either revolver or semi-auto.
    Revolvers - you just pull the trigger - it shoots. Sometimes semi's don't.

    As you can see - there is a lot here - and a lot more...

    Good luck. Ask more questions. Go to shops - gun shows - don't jump into the first thing.
    Everyone here wants to help people figure it all out and become good safe shooters.
     
  20. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    One little mistake I kept making was that I fell in love and had to have as many as I could afford.

    The result was a lot of junque that took up my money that I could have invested in one quality firearm.