Best CCW in your opinion. Recomendation needed.

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by Poink88, Jan 2, 2011.

  1. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    My brother-in-law is asking for a good conceal carry weapon. Price is of no object and he plans on trying/shooting whatever will be recommended before buying but he is a total novice (though going through his class right now) and narrowing the list will help him tremendously.

    He tried shooting several 45's and 9mm, a couple SW revolver and leaning towards a 9mm pistol for his CCW and .45 (1911) HD weapon.

    He is smallish in stature; about 5'-6" and 160 pounds. Wears about 34" pants, M/L shirts.

    Again, he wants a 9mm and currently, he is considering Sig 239.

    Thank you for your assistance.
     
  2. SwampFox

    SwampFox New Member

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    This question has probably been asked time and time again. There is no perfect gun. If money is no object, go out and buy/rent several and spend several hundred dollars at the range and take some shooting classes. The best gun is the one you shoot the best and are most comfortable/confident. A 239 is a good all round carry gun and will serve him well. He will probably find that after a while one gun is not enough he may desire some even smaller for times when it is hot and there is not a lot of clothing choices. I alternate between a J Frame 357, a 1911, and a 229.
     

  3. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    He plans to shoot as much as he can before buying but narrowing down the list helps. His other problem is not having much choice to rent where he is.

    I also think he will end up buying several guns eventually but would like to assist him choosing a good one for now.

    Thank you.
     
  4. SwampFox

    SwampFox New Member

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    The 239 is a good gun and will not let him down. I have one and like it, it is thin, but I also like my 229. I have a higher mag capacity and it is only slightly larger. Glocks and XDs are nice as well. Basically, any modern handgun in the 9mm - 45 acp range, from a reputable manufacture is going to get the job done. Though renting is not a good option for a new person it is the best as they can figure out which feels best and shoots the best. However, I am also partial to my Springfield EMP 9mm.
     
  5. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    I own an XDm but in 40 and plan on having him try it as well. Problem is, we live more than 320 miles away and have no plan on visiting them again for another month.

    I will add the 229 to the list for him to consider. I wanted one but cannot afford it so I ended with XDm (w/o regrets). :) Not sure how difficult it will be for him to CC though.

    Thanks again.
     
  6. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    While there is no "perfect answer", the safest bet in this case is probably a compact (not subcompact) 9mm. The Sig P239 fits the bill. A compact service XD (4"), Glock 19, M&P compact, Sig P229, etc will all probably work as well.

    If he's new to shooting it might be best to steer clear of subcompacts and pocket guns initially, as they require more skill to shoot, are less fun to practice with, and aren't really ideal as your soul option for home defense. These guns may be necessary for CC down the line, but it's a bad idea to use them as a launching point.

    A good compact 9mm is a pretty versatile option for new shooter. It's cheap enough to feed, adequate for defense, small enough to carry, big enough to enjoy range sessions...and easy enough to sell as his desires evolve.
     
  7. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    +1 on the idea that there is no magic handgun that does all.

    I carry differently for where I am going, what I am doing, who will I be seeing.

    Sometimes two, sometimes three, but never just one.

    And just having a firearm in CC does not make anybody a pistolero.
     
  8. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    1. One that goes BANG every time I jerk the bang switch.
    2. One that feels good in my hand.
    3. One that goes Bang every time I jerk the bang switch.
     
  9. Mr. Bluesky

    Mr. Bluesky New Member

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    Fixed, and seconded.
     
  10. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    Been doing lots of research on this for myself.

    First question I've had to answer for myself is how I plan on carrying the weapon. I have decided that it needs to be pocket carry. If I have to put it in a holster on my waist, I know I won't carry it often. Pocket carry limits my choices considerably. For pocket carry, I probably only have a small handful of 9mm choices (Kahr PM9, Rohrbaugh, KelTec PF9). More .38/357 choices: J frame revolvers, Ruger LCR, Ruger SP101 (if you've got a good belt). Lots of 380 choices.

    Now if you want to carry in a holster, your choices are almost limitless. For a 9mm, I'd love a Springfield EMP.

    I'd recommend the same questions be answered by your brother in law.
    1. How will I carry the weapon?
    2. What caliber will I carry?
    3. Where can I play with as many of the choices as possible?
     
  11. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    Scott,

    1. How will I carry the weapon? His initial plan is a shoulder holster but I am talking him into a supertuck.
    2. What caliber will I carry? He is set at 9mm right now.
    3. Where can I play with as many of the choices as possible? Not much ranges available in his area and their rental selection is mediocre. His teacher/friend does have some selection that he lets him shoot. He travels frequently and I might advise him to try ranges in Las Vegas where he will be vacationing in couple of weeks.

    Thanks!
     
  12. billdeserthills

    billdeserthills New Member

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    As a gun dealer my favorite CCW gun is the one you will carry. I like the Kel-Tec P3AT simply for it's small size & good reliability & Foremost because it is easy to carry, wherever you go & that means you will have 0 excuses for not Always having it right here to save your ass.
     
  13. BIGBEN

    BIGBEN New Member

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    The Sig idea sounds very good.Also,Smith&Wesson and Springfield make good semi-auto 9mms.

    For the 1911,i can honestly say i have had no problems with mine.He might even consider trying it for ccw.
     
  14. utf59

    utf59 New Member

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    You said money is no object; what about time?

    If he isn't in a hurry, I'd recommend getting a bunch of trigger time on a .22. You can learn a lot about what you will like/won't like in a center-fire platform by shooting the smaller platform.

    Then I'd recommend buying a full-size 9mm in the platform of his choice (DA/SA, SA, DAO or striker-fired). Again, some time with one of these will let him know what he likes and doesn't.

    If he's happy with the platform, get a compact version of the same gun. If he's unhappy with the platform, either get another full-size in a different platform or, if he's sure he'll like a different platform, get the compact version of that platform. For instance, if he buys a full-size DA/SA gun, but doesn't like that it the trigger pulls differently on the first shot than it does on the follow-up, then he be sure that he wants a striker-fired pistol. So he could go ahead and get a Glock 19, XD compact, etc.

    You might also want him to look at a Kahr or Walther PPS in addition to the other fine choices that others have recommended.
     
  15. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    If he's not enamored by capacity, a P239 is a great gun (have 2 myself). Other smallish 9mm guns I've owned have been Kahr's - a CW9 is a great carry piece and cheaper than the P9...

    (BTW - I hate seeing the word "best" in any thread title)
     
  16. ScottA

    ScottA FAA licensed bugsmasher Lifetime Supporter

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    "Best" is a very inappropriately used word in most instances. This would be one of them. There is no such thing as a "best" gun... no matter what the Glock mafia tells you. ;)
     
  17. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    Guys,

    I know "best" is highly subjective but I am asking for YOUR personal opinion/recommendation based on YOUR experience or knowledge. It is just a word (adjective) and I think it is foolish to ask for a mediocre one...don't you think? I don't care whether others agree (or disagree) with your opinion. I am just trying to get a compilation of pistols to be considered from those who have more know how than me. Honestly, I am not sure if he will buy any of the recommended guns after trying them.

    To those who gave their suggestions...thanks a lot!!!

    Re; time, he wants to CC as soon as he can but the soonest will probably be mid-February. He is trying to hit the range daily right now using as many different guns he can get his hands on.

    Thanks again. :)
     
  18. Moe M.

    Moe M. New Member

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    Since your friend is a novice, there are a lot of things to consider about which would be a better choice for self defense, here are a few.

    In any life and death situation your mind shuts down and you act according to the way you were trained, the best gun and the most target practice that you can get in is not going to save your life if you don't react properly to the threat.
    He needs to take a self defense course from a certified firearms combat instructor.

    Most newbies buy what they see being used on tv action shows, that's usually a semi-auto, either a 9mm or .45 ACP., the rage today is the .40 S&W.
    The problem with most of these for a new shooter is that they have magazines, safeties, slides that have to be racked, and slide releases, and magazine releases, and once they get to the point where they remember all those things and what they do, they manage to get off a magazine or two and all of a sudden the trigger doesn't work, the gun won't fire, then they notice a bullet sticking straight up out of the ejection port, and now they have a problem.
    Now all of this is just part of a learning curve, and they'll get through it, but what if this happens in the middle of the night while someone has just broken into his home, or while he's stuck at a light and someone is trying to carjack him and his wife, that's not the time to be learning.

    I tell everyone that comes to me with your type of question the same thing.
    The best gun for self defense is the one you have with you, most people that I know that carry started out with a 1911, S&W M&P, or a Glock type weapon, they'd carry them for a week or two and then start to leave them at home, they were too heavy. too clumsy, didn't feel right, or pulled their pants down, that's not the gun most people need for protection.
    Small semi-auto's have their own set of problems as well, and many of the small 380's and 9mm's are a handfull to shoot.

    I suggest that a new gun owner who intends to carry for self defense should buy a small framed, easy to carry and conceal handgun, one that has no buttons, levers, and pieces that have to be fitted and pulled, what he needs is a comfortable gripping gun that all he needs to do is point and shoot, no worry about jams and misfires.

    Tell him to buy a J-frame S&W .38 spec. Centenial model, pick up a box of low recoil self defense loads for it, stick it in his pants or jacket pocket and get some instruction.
    After he has mastered that little revolver he can buy himself a whole battery of cannons to have and hold, but I'll bet the gun he continues to carry will be the snubbie.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2011
  19. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Excellent advice. Buy something you are willing to carry. It has to be simple, light and concealable.
     
  20. pioneer461

    pioneer461 New Member

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    There is no such thing as a one-gun-fits-all. What works for me, won't necessarily work for anyone else. Carrying a concealed firearm is a very personal thing. If he has found a pistol that he likes, then that is the one he should get. What anyone else thinks is irrelevant.

    I would recommend he take professional self defense training, which is a totally different animal than a concealed carry class.