benefits of silver bullets

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by TeamTactical, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. TeamTactical

    TeamTactical New Member

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    I was given a box of winchester silvertip hollow points in .38 super for my 1911. Does anyone see any benefits to using this pricey stuff, besides not getting lead in the target? I know people use silver in hunting. But i dont see the benefits as a self defense round.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2012
  2. lbwar15

    lbwar15 New Member

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    Are you talking about Winchester silver tip or the casing being silver?
     

  3. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Are you talking about Winchester silver tips? If so they are not silver. I dont think you will see much silver being used in bullets unless you are going after vampire or werewolves. I dont think you need them for zombies.
     
  4. TeamTactical

    TeamTactical New Member

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    yes winchester silvertips. what is the point of the silver?
     
  5. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    It was just a sales gimmick.
     
  6. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Lone Ranger used silver bullets as a calling card. I guess printers were in short supply in the Old West.

    At around $30.00 per Ounce, silver bullets would only be affordable for the top 1%.
     
  7. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    Its nickel plated brass cases.

    The OG soft point rifle ammo was just a lighter colored lead alloy.
     
  8. lbwar15

    lbwar15 New Member

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    It's nickel plated brass. Good for chamber checks in lo light. And it may or may not run a little smother.
     
  9. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    Nonetheless - I find them reliable in sw 9mm. auto
    I like them
     
  10. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    My silvertips appear to be Nickle plate, but they are 20 years old!
     
  11. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Nickel plated cartridge cases originated around the early 1920s for cartridges used by police departments. At that time polie carried their extra ammo in leather cartridge loops on their belts. The leather corroded the brass cases, leaving a waxy goop called verdigis. the nickel plating eliminated that problem.

    Later some high velocity ammo, especially the .38 Super, was plated to identify it from the .38 ACP rounds.

    The original Silvertips from Winchester were an aluminum alloy, designed for more rapid expansion. Later softpoint cartridges had the Silvertip added to protect cartridges while in the magazine of a rifle.

    Bob Wright
     
  12. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    And, as to silver bullets, silver melts at a much higher temperature than lead alloys. Trying to cast silver bullets in conventional molds will result in a ruined mold.

    Bob Wright
     
  13. TeamTactical

    TeamTactical New Member

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    Lol what are the actual bullets made of. The casings do look pretty sick.
     
  14. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    I am a little confused. Apparently you are asking about Winchester Silvertip bullets in factory loaded handgun ammunition. As stated they aint silver but from what I have in my stockpile the bullets jacket appears to be aluminum. I have shot an antelope with a 45 ACP using 185 grain silvertiops. The expanded bullets jackets are quite soft and flexable. These bullets were designed for fast expansion at handgun velocity. These bullets were used in the famous Miami FBI shootout in the 1980's that got a number of FBI agents shot and killed. Seems the bullets failed to penatrate deep enought to stop the bad guys. On the small antelope all bullets expanded well but failed to penatrate very deep. The silvertip rifle bullets are entirely different. They were not designed as a rapid expansion bullet, but the exact opposite. They were designed as a crontrolled expansion bullet for deep penatration on big game. The early rifle bullets were tipped with a tip that resembled nicklesilver, and the tip extended to the base of the bullet. In @1950 Winchester changed the design to the cheaper to produce modern bullets with a simple aluminum alloy tip covering just the exposed lead. These bullets expand very fast and are known to blow up on tough game.
     
  15. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The Winchester Silver tip line started with rifle ammo like the .30-30. They had an aluminum nose cap and worked quite well. They expanded the concept to handgun ammo. The low velocity rounds like .38 Special, .44 Special and .45 ACP used an aluminum jacketed hollow point. The aluminum allowed for more reliable expansion at the lower velocities than traditional copper jackets. The higher velocity ammo uses a nickle plated copper jacket to "look" like silver and stay in the same concept.
     
  16. TeamTactical

    TeamTactical New Member

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    Thanks for the info guys. So would you reccomend them for self defense at a max range of like 15-20 feet, as opposed to FMJ or traditional hollow points?
     
  17. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Yes, Silvertip rounds are a good quality defense round. The aluminum jackets deform more reliably at low velocity than copper jacketed rounds. There are a lot of more modern hollow points out there that are very high quality and provide reliable expansion now. So there is more competition in the field to give the Silvertips a run for their money, but they aren't a bad bullet.

    I don't recommend FMJ rounds for defense. They usually suck, because they just poke a neat hole through people with less trauma and blood loss which are the keys to stopping attackers.
     
  18. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Winchester Silver Tips ARE conventional hollow points. They are just a different color than the others. I carry the 10mm Silvertips every day because Speer does not make a Gold Dot load in 10mm. I carried .41 Mag Silvertips every day because Speer did not make a Gold Dot in .41 Mag (they do now, but I have retired the wheel gun).
     
  19. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    Many many many many years ago when I was but a lad of 10 or 11 years old and just starting to load on my own my dad had me load some 264 win mag cases for the Sako Finnbear and the bullets were REALLY OLD they were silver Man I wish I would have kept the box.
     
  20. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The bullets you loaded in the .264 were most likely Cupro-Nickle jacketed. They look silver because of the high nickle content. Cupro-Nickle jacketed bullets are common in European loaded ammo from .25 ACP and .32 ACP up to the big rifles. I do not know why that alloy became so popular across the pond.