Beer observation in Germany/Belgium

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by SSGN_Doc, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I've been here for about a month and a half now and noticed that if I order a beer with my dinner it comes in a glass with the company name on it. These can range from mugs to a pedistal style glass. That is not the whole observation. What began to dawn on me is that the glass that each diffeerent beer is served in actually seems to have an effect on the taste, as opposed to drinking the beer out of the bottle.

    A Leffe Blonde or Brune actually tastes better out of a Leffe glass than drinking out of the bottle. Also, they are nice enough to put recommended serving temps on the label, which aslo makes a difference.

    Just some beer snobbery to pass along if you get a chance to sampel some european beers.

    The cheap, Jupiter beer is fine out of a can and is a close match for Rainier as far as a inexpensive after work thirst quincher goes.
     
  2. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Hope you are enjoying your time over here. I have lots of relatives in Belgium. Near Kleine Brogel base. The beer is almost as good as German beer. The type of material does change the taste of beer and wine. Prost!
     

  3. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Well, I noticed the Leffe beer in their glass would have a stream of bubbles only rising from the area in teh center of the bottom of the glass where the pedestal was. This seemed to cotrol the amount of head on the beer.

    Konig Ludwig Dunkel was served in a large mug and had a thicker head, which seemed to add a creamy hint to the beer that the bottled version just did not seem to have. I had it on tap, and also out of a bottle in the mug, as well as directly from the bottle as a sort of test.

    We've been digging at a bomber crash site just inside the Belgian border near Prum, Germany, but make a trip to "The Old Smuggler" store about a Km down the road for some groceries. There is an old border marking post on the corner of the road right by the shop, that marks the Belgium and German border. Some old anti-tank dragons teeth are also near by from the old Sigfried Line.

    The dirt we've been digging is some pretty tough stuff. It resembles Arkansas Red clay, with large chunks of shale and slate in it. It is hard like brick when it's dry, and slippery, sticky and thick when it's wet. Digging with shovels, and pick axes, then moving dirt by the bucket, and then putting all of the dirt through screens by hand, has indeed been a task. We have recovered some human bone and teeth however, and hopefully we can identify some of the crew to put their missing status to rest after almost 70 years.

    The nature of the soil really gives me an appreciation for the foot soldiers who had to dig in to fox holes and fighting positions in this crap. I can only imagine how much tougher it was in the winter.
     
  4. JoeSchmuckatello

    JoeSchmuckatello New Member

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    Nothing wrong with some beer "snobbery" while in that part of Europe. I spent 2 years in Germany while in the Army and I enjoyed every minute of it, especially the beer.

    Have fun and enjoy your experience. One note though......you'll NOT look at American beer, or its taste, the same ever again. ;)
     
  5. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I'm only here for another couple of weeks. We only get a day-and-a-half off every eight and a half days to stay on dig schedule. I did manage to get to Trier, and to Bernkastel-Kues for the end of Weinfest. I'm not normally much of a beer drinker. At home though I usually stick to micro-brews, because of my rare drinking habits. If I only am going to have a couple of beers in a month I figure they should be good beers.

    I do like a quality wine, and quality scotch. Again in pretty extreme moderation.

    Found some nice wines to take home. Mostly from the Mosel region, but I think I picked up a Rhine Region wine as well. My problem is that I prefer red wines, and Reisling seems to be the specialty here. Didn't particularly like the German versions of Pinot Noir grape based wines (Spatburgunder), but did find an award winning Dornfelder to take home as well as a couple Kabinet Reislings of a drier variety that seem pretty ballanced and just dry enough for my taste. I found Eisweine to be interesting, but a bit sweet for my taste. I do appreciate the select nature of that particular variety of wine, but again just not to my taste.

    So in the few free days I've had, I have tried to cram in some culture, otherwise all I would remember of Germany and Belgium would be some really tough dirt.
     
  6. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    You should be able to find some great Belgian and Trappist beers that are impossible to find in America. Bring them back if you dont like belgian style beer, they are gold to beer collectors in the US.
     
  7. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I bought a sampler of Trappist beers. They were pretty good. Liked Orval, and Westmalle Tripel the best. Not impressed with Chimay, but I didn't try it from a Chimay glass to be fair.

    The beer I'm bringing home is basically a micro-brew from an old monestary brewery that has ben turned into a microbrewwery, and restaurant, where we ate dinner one night. Klosterbrauerei Machern, Dunkel is the beer I chose. A nice mellow dark (really a deep amber). Only a 5.2% alchohol content, but very full, smooth taste.

    You're probably right though about finding anything similar back home.
     
  8. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    Check places like Beeradvoacte or homebrewtalk, you can find people willing to trade other hard to find beers for what you bring from Belgium. It's surprising how popular the trading of rare beer has become.

    Coming through Baltimore on your way home? I can recommend some awesome brewpubs and local places.
     
  9. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    Don't know our route back yet. On the way here it was through, Elmendorf, Alaska. JPAC is based in Hawaii so, going closer to over the pole was the shortest distance. Wouldn't matter much, the stopps are usually just long enough to refuel, or pick up or drop off cargo.

    I was doing training near DC back in January, and visited one of our hospital ships, in Baltimore while I was there.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2013
  10. shadecorp

    shadecorp Active Member Supporter

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    AHHH German bier.
    I loved
     

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  11. sbeezy

    sbeezy New Member

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    My dad went to Germany for work a long time ago and he said that the beer there doesn't give you hangovers like American beer. Is that true?
     
  12. Yunus

    Yunus New Member

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    No, it's not. There are many factors involved in hangovers, a or THE primary factor is quantity of alcohol consumed, one thing about european bars is they do not serve nearly as fast as American bars. This can result in more drinking over a longer period of time with less negative effects. It's not the beer it's the consumption rate.

    The specific type of alcohol you drink can also contribute to a hangover, wine and beer are more likely to cause hangovers than vodka due to the impurities. Whiskey is also pretty high on the hangover list due to impurities, it's wood aged which extracts tanins and other aspects of the wood and all that effects potential hangovers. Bottom line though is quantity of alcohol is the main factor, drink more = larger hangover. Drinking plenty of water to prevent dehydration is probably the most important factor in shortening the impact of alcohol on your system
     
  13. sbeezy

    sbeezy New Member

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    Ahhh well maybe that explains it then. It was just an illusion of sorts since he wasn't drinking as much as fast. He was also a lot younger then.
     
  14. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    German beer is stronger. There is also a stronger dark German beer made in the fall (double bock). German beer normally comes in much larger single bottles. I have seen newbies crash and burn. Especially the troops stopping in Germany on the way home. Funny as hell. "Oh I can handle it...."
    Oh, Belgian beer is stronger too. Sorry.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2013
  15. MoreAltitude

    MoreAltitude New Member

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    I recommend DELERIUM Tremens. It's a non-major Belgian brew and should be somewhat easily found around those parts. If you like dark there's also DELERIUM Nocturnum. I was just all around that area (Germany/Belgium) 2 months go and bought it in many places; Mmmmmm!

    My wife likes BitBurger /German
     

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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2013
  16. KJG67

    KJG67 New Member

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    ^^^^^THIS^^^^^
    Trappist. Nectar of the Gods in my book.
     
  17. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Bitburger Pils has many different glasses.

    At the time, it took 7 mins to properly pour a Bitburger.

    I found that with the smaller glasses, the beer had a better taste.
    Our favorite place understood that when we had the glasses 1/2 empty, that the bartender would start pouring another round.
     
  18. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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  19. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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  20. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    Next time look at the bottom of the glass see if its etched some where , for some reason thats where the bubbles are produced . I noticed it recently with a beer here that was served in that companies glass and the center was etched and it bubbled like mad just from that etched area