Barrel Questions

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by oneshotonekill, May 14, 2011.

  1. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    I have a stock ruger 10/22 and it's fairly accurate to a decent ranger but i want it pin point accurate at a little bit father out like a 100 yards or more and i am looking to get a bull barrel along with a new stock but some people say that bull barrels don't increase accuracy but a lot of people say it does and i just don't know which one is true i think it would but i don't know for sure so i was wanting to see if a bull barrel does increase accuracy at longer ranges
     
  2. Jesse17

    Jesse17 New Member

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    I'm no expert, but I believe the added weight of a bull barrel lends itself to stability when firing, and is slower to be affected by heat when you're firing more than one round.

    I don't know if the effects on barrel harmonics increases accuracy or not. I would assume it would.
     

  3. yellowhand

    yellowhand New Member

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    .22 lr for 100 yards

    Ammo, better trigger, bi-pod and a lot of practice.
    Target ammo which means far more expensive will reduce your groupings
    A better trigger, reduced to as low as safe and without take up and such will help.
    A bi-pod or steady rest will do wonders at longer range.
    Barrels will also help,,,,but,,,,
    It's normally a FULL package to reduce group size, not just one item.
    5000 rounds down range will do wonders to make a weapon live up to the owners expectations and hopes.
    A good shooter with an ok weapon will outshoot a so-so shooter with a weapon with all the bells and such each and every time.
    I killed an 8 pound jack rabbit with a $110.00 Gamo .17 from Walmart last evening at about one hundred yards. Single shot to the head, but I was wearing my eyeglasses:):D:);)
     
  4. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    i have my trigger down to 3 pound now and with the stock i have i can't put a bio pod on that's another reason i want a new stock and my brother has a thumb hole stock on his 17hmr and i really like it in the future i am looking to get a new trigger and some other internal parts but first i want to get a good barrel the ammo i am shooting is not real expensive ammo but i can hit the back of a nail at over 30 yards with it consistently but like i said i want to stretch it out to about 100 yards
     
  5. rmloeb

    rmloeb New Member

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    A bull barrel will probably improve accuracy, but an aftermarket barrel from a reputable company will almost certainly be more accurate than the factory barrel. I just bought a new 10/22 because it was on sale. Immediately swapped the barrel for a Kidd bull barrel, which made a huge difference. Then switched to target ammo, which made another big difference. Then switched to a Boyd stock (I have metal pins in my neck which make it very difficult to bring my head down to get a good cheek weld. The Boyd Barracuda has a Monte Carlo cheek, which is high, and allows me to actually get a good cheek weld and even see through the scope.) I reworked the stock trigger with a Power Custom kit, then did some polishing and smoothing, particularly to the bolt. The trigger pull was down to about 3 pounds with no pre-travel, so it was a very specific break. However, I then swapped in a buddy's Kidd trigger (mine is on backorder), and that made an enormous difference. It's a 2-stage and set to break at about 6 ounces. As a result, I jerk the rifle a lot less. I'm a pistol shooter, and this is my first experience with a .22. After about 2,000 rounds I can now put 5 into one lopsided hole at 50 yards. Not everytime, but frequently enough. Has also improved my pistol shooting!

    Recommendations: first try some high grade ammo, practice, then a new barrel, practice, a new stock if you need one, practice, then either a trigger job by a pro or a replacement trigger, then some more practice.

    YMMV :)

    Rog
     
  6. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    Aftermarket bull barrels increase accuracy several ways over the factory barrels. The bull barrels have tighter chambers, shorter throats, more uniform bore & rifling size, and vibrate less than sporter weight barrels-especially when compared to factory barrels. I just got done building a bull barreled 10/22 and it shoots great. You can cover over a 10 shot group at 75 yards with a dime. I used a Hogue stock & a plain blued model of Green Mountain bull barrel. I can TOTALLY recommend this barrel (86$ wholesale from Brownells or Midway). The Hogue stock comes complete with sling swivel studs for about 75$ or so.
     
  7. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    thanks for all the help the only thing that made me hesitate is that it was going to cost about 300$ because the stock i have wont fit a bull barrel so i am going to have to buy the bull barrel and a new stock
     
  8. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    It shouldn't cost you more than 200$ if you order the exact same barrel & stock that I used.
     
  9. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    well the barrel is a green mountain stain less steal fluted barrel that cost 144$ plus tax and the stock is a Revolution tundra thumb hole stock and it cost 145$ plus tax and then you also have shipping what stock and barrel do you have
     
  10. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    I have the plain ol blued barrel (Green Mountain) and plain Hogue stock.
     
  11. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    i have looked around and they're so many ones i can't find the ones you're talking about can you look around and see if you could find them now and post me the links to them the barrel and the stock and thanks
     
  12. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    thanks you said you can put 10 shots in a dime size hole at 75 yards have you ever shot any father than that, how does it hit farther out if you have, is it good for hunting, and how long have you had yours
     
  13. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    one more thing how old are you and how many years have you been shooting
     
  14. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    sorry for asking so many question but on the reviews on the stock alot of people say it's really flimsy and the groups move according to wear you have the rest or your hand on the stock
     
  15. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Have you tried what you have at 100 yards? It takes alot of practice to read the wind when shooting a 22 at 100 or more yards. If you do change barrels you will have to shoot many brands of ammo to see what one shoots best with that rifle. I assume you did that with your rifle already but will have to do it again with a barrel change. Ammo with a 22 plays a big role.
     
  16. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    I just got done with it & tried several different types of ammo out of it. I haven't had a chance to really "wring it out" yet. I'm dying to test it out further when the weather cooperates. I don't see any reason why it wouldn't be great for hunting. Have only shot it off the bench so far.




     
  17. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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  18. oneshotonekill

    oneshotonekill New Member

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    stalkingbear

    i also looked at the stock and some reviews say it's really flimsy and where you hit depends on where you have you have your hand or rest on the stock have you had any problems with that?
     
  19. Eric0424

    Eric0424 New Member

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    All the synthetic stocks I've held have been flimsy compared to wood. You should be able to install a swivel stud and sand the barrel channel to fit the bull barrel to your original stock if you're trying to save some cash. Then save up for the thumb-hole stock you really want, they really make shooting the 22's a little more enjoyable.