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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone suggest a good book to learn about ballistics? I'm not talking an MIT textbook, just a book that gives the basics in laymen's terms. Thanks
 

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Any of the Sierra Reloading Manuals' editions includes comprehensive information, definitions, explanations and formulae for various equations. It also includes ballistics data for every rifle cartridge available. Two manuals are available - Rifle Reloading and Handgun Reloading. These manuals are in binder form so pages can be removed and copied - a useful tool when doing range work with specific loadings. All kinds of statistics are listed for each caliber, such as Muzzle energy and energy in 100yd. increments, Muzzle velocity and velocity at 100 yd. increments, Points-of-impact, bullet drop at various ranges, Maximum Point Blank Zero Range and much more. The data is listed by caliber, and each caliber is further broken down by available bullet weights. Furthermore, ballistic data is given in 100 fps increments. Because of this detail, data for each caliber is several pages. You won't find more info in ANY other single book.
 

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Ballistics can be subdivided into 3 different types. Internal, External and Terminal. This is inside the gun, after the bullet leaves the barrel and after impact with the target.

Most quality reloading books will cover iinternal and external pretty well. For terminal you will need a different source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Will reloading books have good info on how grain weight, powder, etc. affects velocity, penetration, etc?
 

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They should have such info. Obviously more powder and/or lighter bullets lead to more velocity. Different powders have different burn rates and thus yield different velocities in a given gun.

Penetration depends on a number of things including velocity, bullet weight/diameter/sectional density and weight. Sometimes higher velocity yields LESS penetration if the bullet is frangible. The higher the impact velocity, the faster they will break up.
 

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Will reloading books have good info on how grain weight, powder, etc. affects velocity, penetration, etc?
Check out a Sierra Manual - it will answer al your questions. It provides load data for all calibers using different powders and gives corresponding velocities and energies for each recipe. It also lists optimum "hunting" loads as well as loads optimized for "accuracy". The first few sections are basic reloading instructions and explanations. Of course their data is centered around their bullets - which are some of the best in the industry - but all manufacturers have their own loading manuals - they do not all provide the extensive generalized info found in the Sierra Manuals however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys. Robo, that's the type of info I'm looking for. I want to start at the K1 level of ballistics:D
 
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