Back in the day ....!

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by dango, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    You might say , I'm old school . Like when it comes to rebuilding machanic all devises , I do everything I can . For instance : gaskets , I never bought anything other than exhaust or intake for internal combustion engines . I made every gasket I ever needed with a brass ballpene hammer or hard plastic for aluminum .


    THE QUEST :

    I needed some gasket material that would exceed 600 degrees . Old school , no problem ! I set old looking for a role of gasket material ......:confused: ....! After three days of searching every auto parts store , I finally found what I was looking for . 16" wide by 24" long , $32 ....? Ok , I have enough to last my life time ....!

    Next item: 1/2 ohm resister .... On line , I had to You-Tube a video on how to make one !

    Next item:

    Shrink tubing , about three inches worth . In my day , about $.23 .....!
    I found a multi-pack for , (drum role please) ......$16 ......! Sixteen dollars ......?
    You go broke no matter what you know but all in all , I probably did save myself $1000 !
    One of the problems was a "air bag censor" on my truck . I have heard of people paying over nine hours labor to pin point this problem . Well , I guess I did ok after all ....! :D
     
  2. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    So , I would guess no machanics in the millitary back in the late 60s ......? I was , wheeled , track , gas , diesel , worked on most vehicles back then and we made gaskets for everything ! Oh well , I am getting old .....? .....nah ....:confused:
     

  3. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    I work on "obsolete" stuff.. I usually have to make my own stuff too.

    Just learned how to make my own thread cutting screws... and probably will have to make my own carb gaskets for my Scouts... Getting pretty hard to find 1 and 2 barrel stuff on the shelf of the local parts store.. :p
     
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  4. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I learned from my dad. I had a Sunbeam Alpine, and parts were very hard to get. So, I learned to tap out gaskets with a ball pein hammer...

    I think I still have a box of rolls of gasket material. There might even be some asbestos/clay gasket material.
     
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  5. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    They quit the asbestos stuff . This stuff I bought is rated to 670 degrees but exactly what it's made of , no idea .....! Wow , there is somebody out there that knows what I'm talking about ...:D
     
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  6. MisterMcCool

    MisterMcCool Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Sunbeam Tiger is the cat's meow!
     
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  7. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Designed by Shelby the Alpine roadster ......Kool ....!
     
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  8. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    i keep various types of bulk gasket material on hand. saves downtime waiting on something to arrive if i had to order it. also means i can make oddball gaskets that might not be available. that and high temp RTV, and i can just about get by making most any gasket i need.

    making gaskets is pretty easy. i have done the ball peen hammer method, but i prefer using a X-acto knife, and gasket punches instead. makes much cleaner cuts in the gasket material.
     
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  9. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    Thats how I fix most of the crap that breaks on a towboat. Cant just go to the store. lol
     
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  10. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    My Dad, and brother both had Tigers, I was sixteen and Dad didn’t think that I was mature enough for a Tiger, way to high of power to weight ratio for a beginner driver.

    Tigers were a bit much to handle until you had some experience. The rear end wanted to pass you with the least bit of throttle, and the front end would lift off the ground from the ground effect, before you ran out of rpm on the top end.

    I was with dad when he tried to run out the tach. At about 160, he turned the steering wheel and nothing happened. He straightened out the wheel, and came off the throttle, and the front wheels touched back down.

    Definitely not a good first car.

    I had a buddy who was a mechanic at a Toyota dealer and could get really good prices on Toyota engines and transmissions. He dropped by the folks hous one day while I was out using dad’s welder. Dads tiger was setting there, and Corky started telling me how much better it would perform if we put one of the Toyota 2-liter 4bangers in it backed up with a five speed. After about ten minutes I finally told him to pop the hood. His response was classic. Completely dumbfounded and speechless for about a minute, before he asked who put that in there. I laughed, and told him it was a chicken rancher from Texas. The Tiger was the poor mans Cobra.

    The under hood effect of Dad’s was pretty impressive, it had the four Weber dual choke, side drafts on it. Very quick, and very fast. Also one of th biggest pains in the toucus to tune up I ever worked on. It had a factory installed rubber bung in the left side of the firewall. To change the back two spark plugs, you pulled the Clevis pins the held the pushrods for the brake, and clutch master cylinders to the pedals, lifted the pedals out of the way, and clipped them up with wire hooks installed behind the dash. You could then pull out the rubber bung, and get to the back two spark plugs with a long extension on the ratchet.

    My brother bought his while stationed at Fort Mead in 1970. He had owned it for a couple of years, before he moved home and asked me to help him do a tune up. I get over to his place, and he has an engine hoist set up. I asked him what it was for, and he told me it was to pull the engine enough to get at the spark plugs. He was really pissed when I laughed at him, asked him if he’d ever actually read the Haynes manual he owned, and then showed him how to change the plugs.
     
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  11. Artbrownsr

    Artbrownsr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I've seen my dad make the gaskets for an engine that shattered a piston.
    The only thing some one else did was repair the cylinder wall and put in a sleeve.
    He made the gaskets by putting the material over the block and putting the top half on it, poking a couple of the bolt hole with a long punch, taking off the top and carried on from there. I know after he was finished that it ran for at least the two years that I still lived with them before leaving for the NW.
     
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  12. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    i work on old Japanese and British bikes, most of which have more than half of their parts, long since out of production. If it's for a Harley, an XS650, or a CB750, there are plenty of sites, catalogs, and even shops that stock most of the parts you need.

    Now, when you start talking about pre 1980 Triumphs, Nortons, or say XS750\850 3 poppers, an XS Eleven (Especially the Special, with the smaller tank, and more chrome parts, or one of my favorites to work on, my buddy's 1960s Jawa "Scooter" that seats 2, is a 3 speed, and has been bored and stroked to a 80 CC displacement, sometimes you need to make a part, seal, spring, gasket, ect.

    i had to find a points set for that Jawa once. No Joy. no one made one, and even checking in Europe (Where I sometimes have to go to find parts for the English bikes)left us high and dry. wound up having to pull the old set, and the plate they are on, and go online to look up specs on sets from other makes.

    found out that one from a Ford Anglia was close enough to work, with some fitting. Went to order them, again, no luck, but this time, the guy I talked with had the same type of bike, and told me to pick up a points elimination kit for one of the old Minis, and change out the resistor. Problem solved, as some of them were sold here, years ago, and I had a source for the parts.

    Ordered it, did the mod, dropped it on, and wired it up. Fun ride is an under statement. That thing has enough power, on a low enough weight, that we are now planning on giving it disc brakes from a modern Bergeman 450. one reason is the drums are less effective for stopping it, and finding parts for modern brakes will be easier to find.

    Now, a book to look for on used book store shelves, which I think is right up Trez, Dango's, and a few others on heres' alley is one called "101 Car Restoration Tips and Tricks."

    They even have a section on how to revitalize certain old gaskets, and how to fix things like a cracked block. Well worth keeping an eye out for it, for even the hobbyist.
     
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  13. TimKS

    TimKS Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    If you're a fan of "back in the day", below is the website of The King of Obsolete. Some of you may be familiar with Joey if you ever watched Ice Road Truckers on TV.

    I've followed him via his website for years. He's a talented guy when it comes to fixing just about any kind of machine, large or small.....and he does a lot of it out in the COLD.

    http://kingofobsolete.ca/
     
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  14. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    my brother i replaced the 351 Windsor with a 4 speed manual, with a 429 CJ and a C6! not the Boss 429 engine, but Lima engine. but it's almost as wide as the Boss 429. this was in a 1969 Mustang Mach 1. the valve covers had very little room between them and the shock towers. to change the inner two spark plugs, because of the close proximity of the shock towers, you had to take loose the motor mounts and jack up the engine out of the engine bay to get to them.

    that Mustang was pretty danged fast too! never could figure out why back tires didn't last very long!

    but that
     
  15. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Reminds me of changing the plugs and wires in my 66 Charger. 1,3,5, & 7, no problem at all. Same with 2 & 4.

    6& 8 required one of two things to pull off, either dropping the K frame and raising the body, or loosening the driver's side mount, and unhooking the passenger side mount, then the trans mount had to be unbolted, and pretty mush rotating the engine up from the passenger side, with 2 jacks, and a long wood block.

    It was that or pull the heater box and blower motor, which would still mean removing more than a few pieces from the engine to do so. much simpler to just loosen up the mounts, and lift the motor for that job.

    Not the worst one I ever had to work on, as the 351M that a friend stuffed into a Pinto was a bit more difficult to work on, space wise.
     
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  16. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    i have actually done a couple of old 1966 and 1967 Charger's years ago. you must have huge hands and arms if you had to go through all of that to get those two spark plugs out! of course have hands with long fingers, and my arms are not huge either. that i have done too many cars where the easiest way to remove spark plugs was to put the vehicle in the air and do them from the bottom.

    a buddy of mine were building an old Chevy Vega with a V-8 for a race car. a 454 Big Block V-8! no doubt it would have been a really fun one to change spark plugs on! we never got it fully finished, as we were offered more money than we had invested in it. we did get to do a few clandestine street runs. and it would have been a wicked race car!
     
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  17. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Most plug sockets have hex heads on the ratchet wrench side so with a wrench and some foul language , I usually got to them .
     
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  18. TimKS

    TimKS Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I've never seen the use of foul language recommended in a Chilton, but it's what gets the job done most of the time. :D

    Hmmmm? Haven't seen a Chilton in many moons............
     
  19. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Whats a gasket? When ever something of mine breaks I just buy a new one. You can do that when you are made out of money.......:)

    I keep seven multi-story buildings, that are as old as 65 years, glued together with duct tape and hay-wire. I have hydronic piping that is so rusty, you can see the water moving in it, I have air handlers that are so old I think they were built by John Gorrie.....

    This Summer they all come down and get replaced with a brand new single 300 million dollar facility. I intend to retire.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
  20. Dallas53

    Dallas53 Well-Known Member

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    i'm filthy rich too. i just make my own gaskets to keep myself humble, and because i enjoy the aggravation!