Australian government to force Internet users to install state-approved software

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Bigcountry02, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. Bigcountry02

    Bigcountry02 Coffee! If your not shaking, you need another cup Supporter

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    This is for Australian; however, be on the lookout that the US might try and force this down our throats as well.

    Leaked Australian blacklist reveals banned sites

    Leaked Australian blacklist reveals banned sites - Technology - theage.com.au

    Filtering coming to Australia in 2010

    Filtering coming to Australia in 2010 | EFA

    Lieberman: China Can Shut Down The Internet, Why Can’t We?

    Lieberman: China Can Shut Down The Internet, Why Can’t We?

    No anti-virus software? No internet connection

    No anti-virus software? No internet connection | News.com.au

    Australian government to force Internet users to install state-approved software

    No firewall, no internet connection in latest salvo of web regulation.


    By Paul Joseph Watson, June 22, (prisonplanet) -- The Australian government is set to intensify its war against Internet freedom by forcing web users to install state-approved anti-virus software. If they fail to do so, they will be denied an Internet connection, or if their computer is later infected, the user’s connection will be terminated.
    “AUSTRALIANS would be forced to install anti-virus and firewall software on their computers before being allowed to connect to the internet under a new plan to fight cyber crime. And if their computer did get infected, internet service providers like Telstra and Optus could cut off their connection until the problem was resolved,” reports News.com.au.

    A 260-page report released by the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Communications outlines a plan to mandate Internet users to install government-approved software before their Internet connection can be activated.

    Of course, the vast majority of Internet users already use anti-virus software, but by creating the precedent of having to conform to government mandates simply to get online, this opens the door to later requiring government permission to use the Internet at all, as well as a Chinese-style ID verification system which will prevent “undesirables” from using the web.

    It also makes it easier for the government to use the law to subsequently demand that a mandatory Internet filter also be installed as part of the software package that blocks websites deemed “offensive” to the authorities.

    Efforts to place restrictions on the internet are unfolding apace in Australia where the government is implementing a mandatory and wide-ranging Internet filter modeled on that of the Communist Chinese government.

    Australian communication minister Stephen Conroy said the government would be the final arbiter on what sites would be blacklisted under “refused classification.”

    The official justification for the filter is to block child pornography, however, as the watchdog group Electronic Frontiers Australia has pointed out, the law will also allow the government to block any website it desires while the pornographers can relatively easily skirt around the filters.

    Earlier this year, the Wikileaks website published a leaked secret list of sites slated to be blocked by Australia’s state-sponsored parental filter.

    The list revealed that blacklisted sites included “online poker sites, YouTube links, regular gay and straight porn sites, Wikipedia entries, euthanasia sites, websites of fringe religions such as satanic sites, fetish sites, Christian sites, the website of a tour operator and even a Queensland dentist.”

    The filter will even block web-based games deemed unsuitable for anyone over the age of fifteen, according to the Australian government.

    Senator Joe Lieberman on Sunday called for the United States to move towards a a Chinese-style system of Internet control. Under Lieberman’s 197-page Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PDF), President Obama would be given a ‘kill switch’ to shut down parts of the Internet.

    Constant fearmongering about cyber attacks is the cover for a global assault on Internet freedom by authorities. The web is being overtaken by independent media outlets which are now beginning to eclipse establishment news organs. This has enabled activists and the politically oppressed to expose government atrocities and cover-ups at lightning pace, something the system is keen to curtail.
     
  2. Bigcountry02

    Bigcountry02 Coffee! If your not shaking, you need another cup Supporter

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    Section 706 worse than Lieberman bill (Cyberbill)

    This is already on the books!

    Section 706 worse than Lieberman bill, says Senate Committee - FierceGovernmentIT

    Section 706 worse than Lieberman bill, says Senate Committee

    Existing presidential authority over telecommunications infrastructure is greater than what the Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act of 2010would permit the executive branch to do in case of a cyber emergency, say proponents of the bill.

    The bill, sponsored by Senators Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Thomas Carper (D-Del.) would allow the President to order private sector operators of critical infrastructure to "immediately comply with any [cyber] emergency measure or action developed" by the Homeland Security Department.

    The Obama administration has said it already has sufficient emergency authority, citing Section 706 of the Communications Act and other laws. Section 706 allows the federal government to "cause the closing of any facility or station for wire communication" and "authorize the use of control of any such facility or station" after having declared that a state of war, or the threat of one, exists.

    A "myth vs. reality" release on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (the sponsors are a committee chairman, senior Republican and a subcommittee chairman, respectively) argues that the bill would force the President to be more precise.

    The bill limits cyberspace emergency authority to 120 days without congressional approval and would also allow owners and operators of critical infrastructure to propose alternative cybersecurity, the committee release states.

    The President could invoke emergency cyber authority only in case of a cyber attack resulting in mass casualties, sever economic consequences, long-term mass evacuations or severe degradation of national security capabilities, the release adds. The committee plans to markup the bill June 24, likely sending it that same day to the full Senate floor for consideration.

    Skeptics, however, have argued that the bill simply places too much power in presidential hands.

    "I think we've amply demonstrated over the last decade that even when a president is restricted by law his actions can be...aggressive. It doesn't matter that there are hoops to jump through, the authority and the broad power that this bill allows for is simply unacceptable," wrote Matt Olney, a senior research engineer at Sourcefire, a Columbia, Md.-based cybersecurity company, in a FierceGovernmentIT June 16 guest commentary.
     

  3. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    This is close to book burning!!
     
  4. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Hope and change = Socialism

    I want my Country back!
     
  5. zhuk

    zhuk New Member

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    Jesus, I hope it's not that effing Norton lol


    I am hoping all this "OMG THINK OF THE CHILDREN NET INSANITY" might be quietly shoved onto the back-burner now we have had a politicial Coup yesterday, and a new PM (who isn't beholden to various fanatical christian groups)


    May be too much to hope for in this 'international climate' :rolleyes: