Attic Find

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by Jynx, Jul 7, 2010.

  1. Jynx

    Jynx New Member

    230
    0
    0
    So, I found this old rifle not too long ago while helping my Grandmother clean out her attic. She hasn't been up there in years, and this was sitting in the back, covered in dust, next to an oooooold Sears and Roebuck 12 gauge (both were my grandfather's). I figured Italian of some kind maybe? I know its a 25-06. Looks almost like it could be a Carcano, but honestly... I have no clue. She let me take both of them home. (woot!)

    Dad says I should just pitch it to the gunsmith and see what he'll give me in credit, but I'm kind of a history buff, and enjoy keeping things in the family. Problem is, I know next to nothing about restoring old rifles. But I'm willing to give it a go.

    First thing's first... What the hell is it?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Jynx

    Jynx New Member

    230
    0
    0

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

    19,847
    3
    0
    I dunno' what it is. But if it was your Grandfathers, I'm glad you're going to keep it. :)
     
  4. Shihan

    Shihan Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    8,590
    2
    38
    Very nice find. Don't know what it is but it looks like it doesn't need a whole lot of cleaning up.
     
  5. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

    10,888
    1
    0
    Nice find, Jynx. I would say it is a rifle...:p

    Are there anyother markings on it? Can't really see what it says on the top flat above the numbering. I wish I could help you more, but I'm sure someone her can. Maybe C3shooter or that BillM guy who stops by from time to time.

    Looks like a great project and if you don't want it, send it to me. :D
     
  6. RugerShootinGal

    RugerShootinGal New Member

    3,400
    0
    0
    That is very nice and I do hope you decide to keep it in the family.:)
     
  7. Jynx

    Jynx New Member

    230
    0
    0
    Gee, thanks Skull :rolleyes:

    There are, but I can't quite read them.

    On the bolt:
    KBGK
    25-06

    On the stock, it looks like it has "8G 2750" etched in, along with a "DP" (I think)

    and I think it says "TRRNI" on the barrel.

    Other than that, I can't make anything out.
     
  8. Jynx

    Jynx New Member

    230
    0
    0
    Shi suggested I pull the bolt and look under it for more markings, which I did. Nothing. He says its a Terni.

    I shot a PM out to c3shooter an jpatterson since I was told they were the men to talk to. Any more takers?
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2010
  9. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

    3,659
    0
    0
    It looks to me like the 2506 on the bolt might just be serial numbers and not actually the chambering. [​IMG]
    Sorry I can't help id, but congrats on your cool attic find! [​IMG]
     
  10. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    Not necessarily:

    The 25-06, originally a wildcat cartridge, was picked up by Remington and added to their commercial line late in 1969. The wildcat version dates back to 1920, when it was introduced by A. O. Niedner. Remington has stuck to the original configuration of simply necking down the 30-06 case. The remington Model 700 series bolt action rifles were the first to be offered in this newly adopted caliber. At the present time Remington, Intraarms, Ruger, Savage, Winchester, Weatherby, Sako and almost every other manufacturer of bolt action rifles offer at least one version in 25-06. In addition, the Ruger single shot is available in this caliber. Since its commercial introduction, the 25-06 Remington has become a very popular number.

    25-06 Remington
     
  11. IDVague

    IDVague New Member

    202
    0
    0
    Where was your grandfather in November of 1963? Never mind, it couldn't be...
     
  12. Gatekeeper

    Gatekeeper New Member

    3,659
    0
    0
    Yes JPyle, but I was referring to it looked like it was a sporterized military rifle with an original barrel. I don't know of any old military rifles that used a barrel of 25cal or smaller. So unless the barrel was sleeved I don't see it as being a 25-06.
    Also the bolt stampings just "look" like a part number to me, but as I said" Im no expert"
    I would suggest having a smith do a cast of the chamber to be safe.
     
  13. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

    19,847
    3
    0
  14. Jynx

    Jynx New Member

    230
    0
    0
    Yeah... I'm going to go with a "no" on that one, Vague.

    Here are a few more pics of some of the numbers and stamps on it. Put that little Canon to the test. Sorry if they didn't come out too great.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Jynx

    Jynx New Member

    230
    0
    0
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Started working on some of the rust. Good lord... its a dirty dirty rifle.
     
  16. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

    4,828
    0
    0
    Looks a lot like this 1891 Carcano. Here are some clues for identifying the model and manufacturing year. Many were produced in the Terni Arsenal

    Carcano Model Identification

    [​IMG]
     
  17. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,332
    178
    63
    Italian Carcano- Standard rifle of the Italian army- most in caliber 6.5 mm. TERNI is the name of the Italian Govt Arsenal that made them. Actually rather nice, light rifles, moderate recoil. The GI load used a LOOOOONG bullet that had a tendency to yaw (turn sideways) on impact.
     
  18. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    Be very careful before trying a .25-06 round in this rifle. The Carcano was designed for the 6.5 X 52 round. The pressures of a .25-06 would (IMHO) not be safe in this action. The .25-06 uses a 63mm long case and would not likely fit in the magazine. The .25-06 uses a smaller diameter bullet. Simply rechambering would not work well. It would have to have been rebarrelled and that barrel appears to be original.

    Have a gunsmith check it over and make a chamber casting to confirm caliber.
     
  19. General_lee

    General_lee New Member

    1,264
    0
    0
    It's a sporterized Terni, Which is a variant of a carcano.
    Here's what I found on it:

    Calibre:




    7,35 mm x 51


    Length:




    1020 mm


    Barrel length:




    540 mm


    Weight:




    3,6 kg


    Magazine:




    6, non-removable


    Official abbreviations:




    "7,35 kiv/38"


    Country of origin:




    Italy


    Finnish use: Issued mostly to non-frontline troops (artillery and air-defence) in summer of 1941. Some unlucky frontline infantry units got issued with them also, in those units they got replaced with other rifle types during Continuation War.

    This rifle was based to earlier Italian Carcano rifles originally mainly credited to Salvatore Carcano. Italian troops had become unhappy to ballistics of their 6,5 mm x 52 Carcano M/91 rifles during Italo-Abyssinian War (1935 - 1936). So a new version using 7.35-mm ammunition war introduced to production in 1938, but starting of World War 2 ruined Italian plans of making a transition the calibre of their service rifles. Hence the manufacturing of this rifle stopped in year 1940 and the Italians went back to manufacturing 6.5-mm rifles. As Italians decided to retain 6.5-mm as their standard service rifle calibre new 7.35-mm rifles become available with very cheap price. At the same time Finland had a serious shortage of rifles (and all other military equipment) during Winter War, so when the Italians offered new M/38 rifles the Finns immediately got interested. Negotiations took a lot of time, but finally in April of 1940 deliveries begun and 94,500 of ordered 100,000 rifles arrived to Finland in summer of 1940.

    When Continuation War started Finnish military issued M/38 rifles were mainly to non-frontline troops like artillery, air-defence, supplies units and later after attacks of Soviet partisans even to civilians of remote villages close to eastern border. Also some unfortunate infantry units received these rifles. It didn't take long for Terni (most often used name in Finland used from this rifle, Fabbrica d'Armi di Terni was factory that had made the rifles) to gather a very poor reputation. Rifle had fixed (non-adjustable) rear sight (while the Finnish soldiers were accustomed for sighting in each rifle to get it hit exactly where the soldier using it aimed), poor ballistics and reportedly poor ammunition (with very large dispersion) just emphasised the whole issue. Bayonet of the rifle was removable, but folding. In typical the Mannlicher-fashion the 6-round ammunition clip was pushed through the non-removable magazine. Original Italian fixed sights had been set for distance of 200 meters, but the Finns equipped some of these rifles with new higher front sight blade, which reduced the setting of sights to 100 or 150 meters. However in majority of the rifles the original Italian fixed sights remained to the end. Finnish soldiers usually didn't trust this rifle one bit and whenever they got any possibility to switch it to any other weapon they typically instantly did so. Unfortunately, as transporting of extra weapons back was often difficult Finnish troops had also tendency to simply discard weapons that they had replaced with better (usually captured) ones. So if transporting Terni rifles replaced with better ones was difficult at that time, soldiers often simply threw them away.
     
  20. NitroxAZ

    NitroxAZ New Member

    4,895
    0
    0
    Great find. Good plan to keep it in the family. If you choose to donate it, I am just a hop, skip and a jump away:rolleyes: