Around 6 months left

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by farmer12, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. farmer12

    farmer12 New Member

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    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/for...ver-seen-theres-nothing-we-can-do-to-stop-it/

    "Mr. Pal, who writes for The Global Macro Investor, a research publication intended only for larger institutions, hedge funds, and family offices, believes that a global banking collapse and massive defaults will bring about “the biggest economic shock the world has ever seen” — and there’s nothing we can do to stop it."

    Thoughts? Is this a perfect scenario idea or is it in our near future(emphasis on near)?
     
  2. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like a lot of investors are gonna lose a bunch of money.

    I bet the farmers will still pick their crops, BP will continue drilling oil, The red light camera at the corner will keep sending folks tickets, and gloom and doom will still be preached.

    I am a life-long construction worker. My economic stability collapsed three years ago because of the bankers greed, I have little to fear of something taking all of my savings.....Maybe it is time for the wealthy to get slapped.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2012

  3. bkt

    bkt New Member

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    No one can predict the future, but a collapse wouldn't really surprise me.

    The problem isn't just that banks would have to write off the debt owed to them from Greek and Spanish banks, but that currencies would be devalued big-time. That will suck for everyone who depends on currency to get food, pay for housing, etc.
     
  4. Birchhatchery

    Birchhatchery New Member

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    i surley hope not im buyin a small farm!
     
  5. mcb

    mcb New Member

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    Some expert or another had been predicting a collapse for the last few years. It's a good way to sell books, magazines, subscriptions etc.

    I will continue to invest and plan as I always have. I also think it is a good idea to plan for the worst. Even if the world economy doesn't crash you never know when a local disaster may strike.
     
  6. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    In Kazakhstan, the economy collapsed several years before I went there. They still went to work, and went on with life hoping that things would get better. The Government supplied housing, electricity, water, and food. The tax rate was almost 60%, but the only money paid was from outside companies working within Kazakhstan. They survived the economic collapse but I feel things will be far worse with Global financial collapse.

    I see no end to what a person desperate to feed his/her family will do for food and supplies.
     
  7. PanBaccha

    PanBaccha New Member

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    There is definitely something 'cooking' around the bend by them. Only I know for sure that no matter what happens the banks, Wall Street, and the corporate maggots have been prepared for some time now and quite secured in either foreign investments or currency exchanges. Meanwhile Americans who do not have that luxury of mobility will suffer what little they do have. Talk about treasonous behavior. Oh, how the guillotine appears so empty now. It needs an appropriate casting of characters.
     
  8. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    I think of myself as a fairly optimistic person, and I'm certainly not hoping that anything bad happens, but I can't see how the economy can improve? In my view of things people have to have money to spend in order for the economy to improve. At the moment not enough people have enough disposable income. Add inflation along with the loss of so many high paying manufacturing jobs and you end up with a lot of broke people. It's tough for an economy to improve when the majority is either poor or living paycheck to paycheck. And right now that seems to pretty much be the majority in every country. I just can't see how the economy can do anything but collapse? I really hope I'm wrong.

    Even without a total collapse, I think the kids coming along today are going to see a substantial decrease in their standard of living. It is looking like the 80's and 90's were the golden age of "the great experiment". And that is not me just being negative, but rather me being realistic. It's going to take decades just to get out of the debt were currently in.

    I'm planning for the future based on my current view of our situation. Actual things with value are going to grow in value. That would include guns, bullets, brass, and tools in general. That is what I'm buying. Those things will grow in value or at least keep up with inflation assuming no economic collapse. Those things will be priceless in an economic collapse.

    Things with value that actually have no value are going to decrease in value. That would include the dollar, stocks, and titles of any sort. Stocks and titles would normally have value but all the financial gurus figured out everyone could just profit from the equity in whatever they owned. That leaves stocks and titles as worthless.

    That's my .02:)
     
  9. carbon15man

    carbon15man New Member

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    This subject pisses me off so much I'm an 18 year old and I knw what need to be done to fix the country. All these guys that lead our country are not stupid men if they were they wouldn't have the money they do. Why can't they see that we are spending to much money? Like I said 18 here I make 11 dollars an hour after tax I bring home 350 a week so 1400 a month so I know hey I can't spend more than 1400 bucks a month and if I do I can't call china and ask for more money if a dumb redneck can balance a budget why can't these educated leaders we have do it. Bc they don't want to cut spending EPA a total waste of money they spent 10.2 billion dollars in 2010 we need to cut our government in half it's simple they need to collect more tax money than they spend and they knw that they can't raise taxes bc ppl have lil to no money now so it's simple as that get rid of all this government
     
  10. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    Most got their money the old fashioned way, they inherited it. :)
     
  11. Sonic82

    Sonic82 New Member

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    ....and the malls are packed around our area every weekend :confused:
     
  12. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    Those people are buying primarily cheap Chinese junk.

    In 1964 Winchester made changes to the model 70. In effect they made it cheaper and that's why pre 64's are valued so much. Think about how the popular rifles today compare to even a 65 Winchester in terms of quality, workmanship, and so on - much less a pre 64? Now think about how much a rifle would cost today if it were made in the same manner as a pre '64 Winchester?

    We buy a lot of stuff today but the stuff buy is primarily junk. And now we've reached a point where even our junk is expensive. Things of real quality are astronomical. We're getting to the point where I could see an old home costing significantly more than a new one just because of the materials used to construct it and much higher quality in craftsmanship (have you priced copper and wood lately?).

    Our quality of living has already dramatically dropped and we don't even realize it. New homes tend to be poorly constructed piles of splinters and plastic sitting on a cracked concrete slab. Aluminum is even making a come back for wiring because it is so much cheaper than copper (there's a reason people quit using it years ago). Our cars, guns, and even tools aren't far behind.

    Have you noticed how popular Mosin Nagants are today? I'm not a fan of the Nagants. I certainly wouldn't knock anyone for buying one. For many people that is what they can afford, and I've been there. In the past a Mauser or Enfield was all I could afford and those were the poor man's gun years ago. Now the reason I'm not a fan of the Nagants is because of what they represent. We went from a poor man's gun being an Enfield or Mauser to a Nagant? At this rate in five years or so people will be raving over the British muskets that you can get for $100. Seriously, people are going nuts over a WWI Soviet made peasant rifle????? And the really sad part is that those guns are probably made better than many of the current production sporting rifles. For me the Nagants represent just how much our standard of living has already fallen along with the value of the dollar. My first Enfield was only $45 and that was in the mid 80's.

    I know that was long winded, but this is a lot more complicated than just where the Dow closed at today. The malls are full of people spending money, but on what? What exactly are they getting for that money? Are they getting more for it than people got for the same amount 10 years ago? How about 20 years ago? What about 49 years ago which would have been 1963?
     
  13. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

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    I make $35,000 a year
    I spent $50,000 last year (got some kewl guns too)
    My credit card debt is $160,000
    And my mortgage is $1,200,000
     
  14. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

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    Carbon,

    Don't give the leaders too much credit, they probably aren't as smart as you give them credit for. Funny side story, in my MBA finance class, prof, retired exec VP from the federal reserve was asked a question by Chris. "Dr. A, with all the smart people in Washington and all the smart people on Wall street, how the hell did we get into this mess?" Long pause..., "Chris, what makes you think they are any smarter than you?"

    Your thoughts on just spending what you have to spend is an extremely good idea, and the basis of Ron Paul's campaign... But, I want you to think about what happens if you suddenly took an extra 1.5 Trillion out of the economy. That pays for a LOT of peoples wages. Even at 100,000 per position, that's 1.5 Million people suddenly out of work looking for work in the private sector that doesn't have positions available, and even worse, that further drives down the govt revenues, while you just increased costs too. You save the salary costs, but the govt social network costs went up even more. It's a tough tough problem.
     
  15. carbon15man

    carbon15man New Member

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    Well see there's the thin they don't nessa have
     
  16. carbon15man

    carbon15man New Member

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    They don't have to cut that many jobs jus cut the pay on a lot of them and all the welfare and hell me girl friends parents (I don't Bragg about anything let's get that clear) have more money than they know what to do with they have chicken houses and he cuts the country schools grass and a whole subdivision I know he gets 80,000 a year for the subdivision and I believe it's a lil over 300,000 for the schools. So jus the landscaping is 380,000 a year I'm not sure of the chicken houses but whenever they go buy anything from lowes or a new mower or truck to pull trailers it's tax free as long as it goes with the farm or landscaping these are the ppl that can afford taxes... Tell me this isn't a problem
     
  17. carbon15man

    carbon15man New Member

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    image-467273558.jpg

    This kubota is top of the line 20 grand they got it tax free. Why bc the government thinks they need it to be check out the house in the background does it look like they can't afford taxes?

    P.s. that's my handsome SON with the girly hat on