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Ronnie Barrett's Company here in Tennessee gets a $50 Million Dollar Contract for the Army's Precision Sniper Rifle Program. The new Sniper Rifles are in multi caliber options. 7.62X51, 300 Norma Magnum and 338 Normal Magnum. At the present time the contract is figured on 2,800 units. Which figures at a ridiculous price per Rifle at close to $18,000. Even though I am sure it is accompanied by the barrels for the 3 different calibers, Magazines, Scopes, Mounts, Storage Cases, Spare maintenance parts, Cleaning Systems but still that is Government exuberant spending and waste of our tax dollars. Not to mention the cost of the specialized ammunition for the two 300 Calibers. The Marine Corp Sniper Program is also wanting this Rifle. *The Barrett Multi Role MRAD Sniper Rifle. They have estimated each Rifles in their "predicted Budget" of a cost around $17,000 +. If it is the same as the Army Contract they are looking closer to $18,000 per unit.
Nice Rifle and great Optics! Night Force! But a bunch of $$$$$$$$$!
Barrett MRAD Sniper Rifle.jpg

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Doesnt the cost on these contracts include the full kit, a certain number of rounds per unit, and training ?
But yes, the old $500 hammer, $600 toilet seat ...will never change.
 

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Seems our government is willing to pay a lot of money to kill someone that isn't worth near as much if anything in some regards. Unless, of course, they are killing our people. It sure does cost a lot to kill our enemies. Maybe we have too many enemies. Doesn't seem like Trump had to kill that many people compared to a lot of his predecessors. Dementia Joe has already killed a bunch of nameless folks in Syria that nobody seems to care about. At least it keeps the military industrial complex healthy.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Cliff

About your inquiry! I do not know what all is included for each Rife they did not specify. To meet that price I would hope a lot goes with it. If each rifle is infact capable of multi-purpose. It would take 3 different Barrels Chambered for the 3 Calibers mentioned. Which will also involve possibly 3 different multiple Magazines for each rifle. I also assume the Contract would also include Armorer Schools for the Army Armorers. Obviously for serious issues the rifles would probably need to go back to Barrett. If I do find the total package info I will share it here on the Forum.

Edited later: Here is some additional information to this Post! It also comes with a Suppressor on each Barrel and Bi Pod on the Stock of the Rifle.

The MK22 is part of the Army’s Precision Sniper Rifle (PSR) Program which also includes the * Leupold & Stevens (Beaverton, OR) Mark 5 HD scope (Change of Optics!) and a sniper accessory kit.
The MK22 is a modular system that will be fielded with three separate calibers, the .338 Norma Magnum, .300 Norma Magnum and 7.62×51 NATO.
Army snipers will be able to conduct a *Barrel Change and select calibers based on their mission operating environment.
The PSR program will allow the Army an extreme range weapon systems that is lighter than current sniper rifles and includes features that will mask the sniper signature for improved survivability.
SOCOM previously awarded a contract to Barrett to purchase the MRAD as part of their Advanced Sniper Rifle (ASR) program.

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Must be gold plated for that price, the rife the British army is using.

Accuracy International Super Magnum Bolt Action Sniper Rifle with Schmidt & Bender Scope and Case
Estimate Price: $4,500 - $7,000
 

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One $17K rifle with a good sniper is a LOT cheaper (and more precise) than one Hellfire missile fired from a drone or aircraft. Particularly if there is concern about collateral damage.
A first-round miss also gives up the advantage of surprise - something critical for sniper engagement.

Parts: repair parts are notoriously expensive. Think of all the parts/pieces for such a rifle (any rifle, really): multiple springs, bolts, barrels, stocks, screws, magazine parts, special tools, suppressors, etc. for the rifle, scope, bi-pod, stock. Each one of them requires a National Stock Number (NSN), and perhaps some of those parts are already in the system and don't require a unique NSN (it all depends on the contract - for example, the contract may require that all tools required to repair the rifle are already availalbe in a standard armorer's tool kit). It costs $50 (one time charge) to just establish an NSN and about $250/year to maintain an NSN in the system. This is just entering and maintaining the number in the "system" - it doesn't include the parts themselves. Those parts - apparently included in the contract with Barrett - must be stored and maintained in multiple Army locations - depending on the level of maintenance required to replace that part, as well as with Barrett. Unlike the commercial world, a 1-3 week delay in getting the parts in a globally fielded Army is unacceptable, so ordering a part from a central location generally doesn't work. That means storing (and accounting for) parts all over the world and that is factored into the total cost. Many years ago, I taught Army Wholesale Maintenance Management (this was national-level logistics). While I don't recall the specific numbers, a real, valid study done by someone with too much time of their hands revealed that for the Army to buy a complete M151A2 Jeep, the price was about $6,000 (this was way back); the price of the individual parts in order to assemble a complete M151A2 was about $20,000...(this didn't include labor) Plus, for common things like screws/washers which may work, it's not like the shooter (or armorer) can go down to his local True Value hardware store in the wilds of Afghanistan (or the Arctic or jungles of South America or Africa) to get them.

Repair manuals: Yup, gotta have them: one set for the operator, one set for the unit armorer, one set for the direct-supporting unit, etc. Somebody has to write them and maintain them (updates/corrections), tailored to the soldier doing the repairs/maintenance, in multiple operating conditions. While much of this can be digital, manuals for the operator and possibly the unit armorer still need to be printed. This is sometimes included in the contract and Barrett needs to have some folks familiar with Army tech and format standards for the manuals. I believe Barrett also employs 24/7 immediate tech support world-wide, probably part of the contract. That isn't free.

Ammo: much of this is unique in the Army supply system. As with repair parts, ammo needs to be stored and rapidly available - anywhere in the world. If the contract includes X number of rounds for each caliber, there is the cost for that, too. I suspect the quality standards are a bit higher than commercially.

Operational requirements: Six-foot concrete drops are a standard survivability requirement for many items. That can make for a fairly stout rifle system, more so than what most personal owners would require (or even dare test). These rifles are being employed in places and harsh conditions no regular civilian would typically go, in world-wide climes from the Arctic (probably minus 40-70°) to the deserts of Saudi Arabia (up to +130°) to high-humidity conditions in the world's jungles. That is a pretty wide range of temperatures and conditions. How many here would take their primary sniper/hunting rifle through ocean surf and rely on it for your life for a few weeks? The SOF guys jump out of aircraft at 30,000 feet in extreme cold, drop through that cold air for a number of minutes, then deploy their 'chute and possibly go right into combat. So it is not just extreme temps, it is also a rapid change of those temps, while still expecting the rifle to fire - and fire accurately - upon landing.

Contractor support: usually included in contracts such as these, but there are limits both known and unknown as to how far forward this support can go and how extensive it is. Requirements stipulated in the contract along these lines are not cheap.

Training: gotta have, for operators and maintainers. This is usually included in the contract price, and includes training manuals.

Testing: operations to failure to determine Mean-Time-Between-Failure (MTBF) and Mean-Time-To-Repair (MTTR) are usually included in the contract. Same with operational testing to ensure these rifles perform in the required conditions. MTBF and MTTR requirements are typically in a contract of this nature. Somebody has to pay for that testing, and much of it is included in the item price.

All of these pump up the per-item cost; while the cost for much is constant whether or not the Army buys one hundred rifles or 20,000 rifles, the cost is stratified, for the same reason the cost of the F22 per-item skyrocketed when the numbers bought dropped precipitously. It might be called "overhead". Not to mention the cost of Barrett making the tooling and QC and building facilities to mass-produce (sort of) these rifles...all part of the contract price. And they still need to make a profit.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Manta

One Great Rifle System! With that Rifle and the right conditions 1,000 meters "a piece of cake"! A good quality Sniper Rifle System is a fantastic tool! When accompanied by a well trained and competent shooter.
Thanks for the Thread! :)

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Why would you need the rifle in three different calibers? Why not decide on one and go with it? Is the philosophy that there is more and less dead?
 
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Discussion Starter #11
RJF

Very well stated!
I had the pleasure of being a National Director of Law Enforcement & Government Sales and Training for several years when we landed a huge US Government Contract for AR-15 Rifles. So I appreciate your article! There is a lot more involved with a major contract than just the physical rifles themselves. And especially involving the vast coverage as you mentioned of a Military Contract that has a World Wide application.

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One $17K rifle with a good sniper is a LOT cheaper (and more precise) than one Hellfire missile fired from a drone or aircraft. Particularly if there is concern about collateral damage.
A first-round miss also gives up the advantage of surprise - something critical for sniper engagement.

Parts: repair parts are notoriously expensive. Think of all the parts/pieces for such a rifle (any rifle, really): multiple springs, bolts, barrels, stocks, screws, magazine parts, special tools, suppressors, etc. for the rifle, scope, bi-pod, stock. Each one of them requires a National Stock Number (NSN), and perhaps some of those parts are already in the system and don't require a unique NSN (it all depends on the contract - for example, the contract may require that all tools required to repair the rifle are already availalbe in a standard armorer's tool kit). It costs $50 (one time charge) to just establish an NSN and about $250/year to maintain an NSN in the system. This is just entering and maintaining the number in the "system" - it doesn't include the parts themselves. Those parts - apparently included in the contract with Barrett - must be stored and maintained in multiple Army locations - depending on the level of maintenance required to replace that part, as well as with Barrett. Unlike the commercial world, a 1-3 week delay in getting the parts in a globally fielded Army is unacceptable, so ordering a part from a central location generally doesn't work. That means storing (and accounting for) parts all over the world and that is factored into the total cost. Many years ago, I taught Army Wholesale Maintenance Management (this was national-level logistics). While I don't recall the specific numbers, a real, valid study done by someone with too much time of their hands revealed that for the Army to buy a complete M151A2 Jeep, the price was about $6,000 (this was way back); the price of the individual parts in order to assemble a complete M151A2 was about $20,000...(this didn't include labor) Plus, for common things like screws/washers which may work, it's not like the shooter (or armorer) can go down to his local True Value hardware store in the wilds of Afghanistan (or the Arctic or jungles of South America or Africa) to get them.

Repair manuals: Yup, gotta have them: one set for the operator, one set for the unit armorer, one set for the direct-supporting unit, etc. Somebody has to write them and maintain them (updates/corrections), tailored to the soldier doing the repairs/maintenance, in multiple operating conditions. While much of this can be digital, manuals for the operator and possibly the unit armorer still need to be printed. This is sometimes included in the contract and Barrett needs to have some folks familiar with Army tech and format standards for the manuals. I believe Barrett also employs 24/7 immediate tech support world-wide, probably part of the contract. That isn't free.

Ammo: much of this is unique in the Army supply system. As with repair parts, ammo needs to be stored and rapidly available - anywhere in the world. If the contract includes X number of rounds for each caliber, there is the cost for that, too. I suspect the quality standards are a bit higher than commercially.

Operational requirements: Six-foot concrete drops are a standard survivability requirement for many items. That can make for a fairly stout rifle system, more so than what most personal owners would require (or even dare test). These rifles are being employed in places and harsh conditions no regular civilian would typically go, in world-wide climes from the Arctic (probably minus 40-70°) to the deserts of Saudi Arabia (up to +130°) to high-humidity conditions in the world's jungles. That is a pretty wide range of temperatures and conditions. How many here would take their primary sniper/hunting rifle through ocean surf and rely on it for your life for a few weeks? The SOF guys jump out of aircraft at 30,000 feet in extreme cold, drop through that cold air for a number of minutes, then deploy their 'chute and possibly go right into combat. So it is not just extreme temps, it is also a rapid change of those temps, while still expecting the rifle to fire - and fire accurately - upon landing.

Contractor support: usually included in contracts such as these, but there are limits both known and unknown as to how far forward this support can go and how extensive it is. Requirements stipulated in the contract along these lines are not cheap.

Training: gotta have, for operators and maintainers. This is usually included in the contract price, and includes training manuals.

Testing: operations to failure to determine Mean-Time-Between-Failure (MTBF) and Mean-Time-To-Repair (MTTR) are usually included in the contract. Same with operational testing to ensure these rifles perform in the required conditions. MTBF and MTTR requirements are typically in a contract of this nature. Somebody has to pay for that testing, and much of it is included in the item price.

All of these pump up the per-item cost; while the cost for much is constant whether or not the Army buys one hundred rifles or 20,000 rifles, the cost is stratified, for the same reason the cost of the F22 per-item skyrocketed when the numbers bought dropped precipitously. It might be called "overhead". Not to mention the cost of Barrett making the tooling and QC and building facilities to mass-produce (sort of) these rifles...all part of the contract price. And they still need to make a profit.
Got a point there. I think I'd rather go with the sniper rifle with my money when you put it that way.
 

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At the first part of the Vietnam war, the snipers procured rifles from sporting goods stores and had their armorers fine tune them. A few hundred bucks..... Maybe people didn't take as much killing way back then.
 

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I would probably buy a non firing replica, or a miniature version of this, but never the less still a beaut
It is only a matter of time before Glock produces a Tupperware version, if for no other reason than to ugly it up.
 
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damn, thats a sexy gun, but its more trouble than its worth
That would be debatable by the SOCOM shooters whose life depends on it.

BTW, here's some cost info regarding air-ground munitions, and their cost. Note this doesn't include the cost (and danger to pilots) of operation of the aircraft delivering justice.

There is a trend toward limiting lethal weaponry when collateral loss of innocent life is a concern; the small-diameter bomb being one (not to mention the "Hassan-Chop" Hellfire that has no explosive warhead but a number of blades to slice-and-dice the target). There is nothing more precise toward a specific target than a good sniper with a great rifle, particularly at great range with the right ammo for the target and range. Not to mention the psychological effect of spattering a bad guy's brains all over his compatriots when they have no idea what happened. They live in fear after that.

Snipers are the epitome of precision weaponry.
 
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