Arisaka

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Discussion' started by easterner123, Jan 12, 2009.

  1. easterner123

    easterner123 New Member

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    My uncle has an early model of an arisaka rifle. All we know is that it is japanese in orgin, and that it seems to have seen it's share of use. How much would one of these be worth in "fair"condition? (By the way, it is pre WWII in manufacture)
     
  2. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    If it has the imperial mum intact, it will be worth more than one ground off after the war. You'd probably get about $150 for one in "fair" condition. I've seen ones like that for around $250 at local gun shows.
     

  3. easterner123

    easterner123 New Member

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    thanks scott g. ill look more into the serial number, from when he let me see it the serial number was still there.
     
  4. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    They wouldn't necessarily remove the serial number. They ground off the imperial mum, the insignia of the emperor. Like this pic taken from Wikipedia

    Arisaka_Type_99_mum.jpg
     
  5. janikphoto

    janikphoto New Member

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    I've seen "fair" condition models at pawn shops for $150. I think only the pristine ones will fetch a pretty penny.
     
  6. easterner123

    easterner123 New Member

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    Ah, I see. I'll have to ask him to send me pictures of it. When I looked at it, the only scratched part was the wooden stock and a couple on the barrel, I'll double check and post some pictures.
     
  7. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    For some reason, original bayonets are harder to find than the rifle.
     
  8. janikphoto

    janikphoto New Member

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    like cleaning rods for the mauser, some accessories are more rare than the firearms they belonged to...
     
  9. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    True. Somewhere is a warehouse, and some guy is looking at a crate of metal sticks, thinking "Wonder what these were for?":)
     
  10. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    The cleaning rods for German WWII mausers were discarded by the USSR in order to make them fit treaty obligations after the war. They just threw them away and changed some screws to allow them to be kept according to arms agreements. That's why authentic rods are hard to find.
     
  11. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    Correct. Removal of the cleaning rod rendered them "demilled".

    I love the USSR.:eek:
     
  12. easterner123

    easterner123 New Member

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    well, the rifle isn't in half bad shape, and the imperial mum is there. It is hard to see, but I know it was never grinded off. My uncle's uncle had swiped it during world war two, how I have no idea. I can't upload the pics onto here for some reason, and besides for some light rust on the action, the rifle itself is in a lot better shape than I remember. A little gun oil and some cleaning and the thing is as good as new. Just wondering, what is the significance of the imperial mum and why were so many grinded off? and i realize this rifle isn't worth much, as Japanese WWII weapons weren't of the highest quality
     
  13. ScottG

    ScottG New Member

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    Well, don't be fooled by the "last ditch" Japanese rifles when you're comparing them to prewar rifles. The last ditch, made at home, out of blank wood stocks type of rifle is probably not worth much, but a prewar with an intact mum should be worth more than $300.

    The mum was the imperial insignia, defacing it was denying Hirohito's godhood. In the same way, peening of the waffenamts of Nazi era Mausers and such is to indicate total and complete defeat of those two ideologies.

    They were beaten and they couldn't deny it when their insignias were defaced.
     
  14. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    There is a good web site that will tell you a lot about it.

    Right here.
     
  15. easterner123

    easterner123 New Member

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    alright, I'll check with that link and see. There's still a signature thing there though, and I'll have to read the dates on the rifle, but Thanks for all the input and help everyone.
     
  16. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    sounds like an interesting find . many thing add or subtact from the value. does it have a dust cover over the bolt? if so is it serial numbered to the gun? does it have original sling, cleaning rod, monopod, muzzle cap? these are just a few things that alter the value. unlike mausers jap rifles werent sold as surplus after the war. virtually all were brought home as war souviener
     
  17. WILDCATT

    WILDCATT New Member

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    arasaka

    what cal,there are 2 cal 6.5 and 7.7.forget about the poor quality.thats only in some ones head.they were stronger than most any military gun.proven tests.the early 6.5 was very well made.the 7.7 went from very good to poor.
    but there are guns that were never made to shoot.I have 5- 7.7 and 2- 6.5.
    the two piece butt is normal as they always were short on wood. ammo can be bought from GRAFS its Privi Partizan (serbia)can you read jap as the dates are in japanese.:rolleyes: :D
     
  18. hillbilly68

    hillbilly68 New Member

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    Ah the good old days. I remember seeing stacks of these things in the local shops when I was a kid, a "6.5 jap" would go for all of 40 bucks. Nobody would get one 'cause they were terrible shooters. Now 300 bones. Go figure.