are the recoils the same between 9 & 40

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by glock219, Jul 31, 2012.

  1. glock219

    glock219 New Member

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    Some say 9mm has more recoil, & some say 40
     
  2. niteglock

    niteglock New Member

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    .40 has more. Especially in a sub compact. 9mm will never have more recoil. Thread done.
     

  3. niteglock

    niteglock New Member

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    Oh and .40 has more recoil than .45acp also.
     
  4. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    I disagree, my 1911 and the XD45 my friend has have ALWAYS had a more recoil than my Beretta 96 or his XD40.

    40 S&W does have harder recoil than a 9mm, but not a ton, both are very manageable.

    Felt recoil is also different for different people, it depends on several variables, shoot both and decide for yourself.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  5. niteglock

    niteglock New Member

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    I'll agree u put it better than me. But in my opinion. .40 is def more than 9mm and more snappier than .45. Should've put it that way. Sorry. .45 is more manageable than .40 and 9mm is more manageable than .40.
     
  6. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    Out of curiosity, what kind of .40 and .45 are you shooting?
     
  7. niteglock

    niteglock New Member

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    Glock 21 and glock 23 and smith .40. Full. Oh and springer TRP .45.

    9mm's= berettaM9, Sig P226, XDm9. All full sIze
     
  8. sputnik1988

    sputnik1988 Active Member

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    Like I said, felt recoil varies from person to person, kind of odd that the 23 recoils more than the 21 though.
     
  9. niteglock

    niteglock New Member

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    I wouldn't say it's more of a recoil but a snappiness. The .40 is def more snappy than .45.
     
  10. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    When your talking about felt recoil, which is all anyone really cares about, there are several factors that come into play:

    Recoil pulse - this is how the actual energy is distributed into the hand.

    Hold - The way the shooter holds his firearm affects how the pulse is interpreted.

    Firearm design - The height of the barrel over the arm centerline affects how much "whip" is perceived; The lower the barrel, the easier for the body to absorb the recoil pulse in a straight line. As an example, Chiappa Firearms changed the barrel on a .357 revolver from the 12 o'clock position to th 6 o'clock position, thereby greatly reducing the difference in barrel height that revolver shooters generally have to compensate for. The Chiappa revolver is reported to have greatly reduced felt recoil.

    Stance - The body absorbs recoil differently depending on arm position, shoulder position, stance and posture. Even locking or unlocking elbows can affect recoil perception.

    Ammunition - All elements of ammunition affect recoil. Small vs large primer, slow vs fast powder, size of bullet (differences of 1/10,000 of an inch can change resistance of force), if the bullet is crimped in the case, if the bullet is lead or jacketed (resistance against the barrel), different types of rifling will resist differently, etc.

    And all of these have an effect in a wide array of varying degrees. All of this to say that felt recoil is a very personal thing and very hard to quantify scientifically. The best thing to do is "Try before you buy" on any new gun, But you must also realize that if you have a gun that is perfect in every way but only slightly uncomfortable, there are ways to change the recoil on your firearm: change grips, change barrel, change ammo, and others. Felt recoil is probably the most subjective part of shooting sports there ever was!
     
  11. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Can you explain to me why this is? Is it the grains in the powder?
     
  12. Ranger-6

    Ranger-6 New Member

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    I am so silly that I though recoil was proportional to the amount of gunpowder one could pack into a cartridge case, and the weight of the bullet to be launched. Go figure...
     
  13. 75370

    75370 New Member

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    Also the weight of the gun and comfort of the grip. I think what is happening here's an example of comparing apples to oranges, (Comparing a lightweight .40 with a short grip, to heavier .45 with a larger grip frame, like a 1911 type).
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  14. Brennan16

    Brennan16 New Member

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    Has anyone mentioned the weight of the firearm yet?
     
  15. Brennan16

    Brennan16 New Member

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    Sorry 75370. You beat me to the punch. That should have been the first thing that was said.
    I have a 5906 that doesn't recoil hardly at all yet my PT111 rises and flips and kicks pretty heavily.
     
  16. Sodpod

    Sodpod New Member

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    The .40 has noticeably more recoil than a 9mm IMO. Both operate at the same pressures if I'm not mistaken, but you push a bigger chunk of lead out of the .40. Also .40 generally operates about 14,000psi higher than a .45.
     
  17. niteglock

    niteglock New Member

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    Thank you.
     
  18. juststartin5272

    juststartin5272 New Member

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    You have to consider that the 23 has a shorter barrel than the 21 so the snappyness would make sense
     
  19. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    HAHAHA this is my kind of thread as I am a recoil junkie.:D I feel the .40 is snappy compared to 9mm/.40/.45 in a pistol, it just wants to lift the muzzle up more for me. The 9mm is going to be the lightest of the felt recoils, then the .40 but the snap is a down side for many, then the .45 which hits hard but the recoil is very easily managed so second shot on target is easily very quick. The .45 gives you the percussion that you can feel deep down in your bones and a ear to ear grin that you just can't knock off with a sledge hammer.

    All of this can be changed if you play with the barrel length or type of gun used or even the ammo used, but if you fire all of these out of relatively the same style gun with the same barrel length and somewhat similar ammo you should see what I am saying.