Are black powder rifles and pistols fun to shoot?

Discussion in 'Blackpowder & Musket' started by saviorslegacy, Feb 22, 2010.

  1. saviorslegacy

    saviorslegacy New Member

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    Are black powder rifles and pistols fun to shoot?
    I have never had the pleasure of firing one.

    Also, how much does a decent one cost? Do the newer reproductions shoot accurately? Can you get ammo for them (the little paper cylinders with the pre-measured amount of charge and the bullet).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2010
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    I guess I am a cheap date- I enjoy just about anything involving guns, including my charcoal burners.

    Every hunter seems to be determined to have a bolt action breech capping in line 209 primer rifle- as a result, there are some bargains on traditional cap lock rifles, like the Thompson/ Centers. Have seen some nice ones for $200 or less.

    Accuracy? As good as you are. Due to lower velocity, the trajectory is a prounced curve (think rainbow) so at long range, accracy depends on range estimating ability.

    You can buy Pyrodex pellets- I use JOB double wider cigarette rolling papers to make my own combustible cartridges with REAL black powder- and cast my own 50 cal maxi balls.

    Nice thing about muzzle loaders? As far as the Feds are concerned, they are NOT firearms. No 4473, no FFL, and the mailman can bring it to your door.
     

  3. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    I use an inline rifle for hunting during muzzleloader season. I have a couple of the reproduction cap and ball revolvers. While the modern inline rifle is extremely accurate the revolvers are fairly accurate with the balls. I enjoy shooting them. Powder, caps, primers and ammo is easy to find at most sporting goods stores. I have not seen the paper cartridges. C3 seems to have the answer for that. :D
     
  4. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I had a .50 caliber Hawkins that I sold last year. Very accurate rifle even w/ primitive sights. I liked shooting patched round ball. I still have an 1858 New Army repro that is a blast to shoot.
     
  5. saviorslegacy

    saviorslegacy New Member

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    Out of curiosity, how do you make your balls?
    I know how the British made them around the American Revolution (dropping metal off of a tower so that it makes a perfect ball and then letting it land into a pool of water so that it stays that way), but rather than that I am greener than a weed.
     
  6. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    Shooting Black Powder is the most fun kind of shooting that I do.

    Can it be expensive? - sure as can any venture.

    You can find inexpensive ways to get started. My introduction to BP was through a BP cap and ball revolver, then I moved to BP cartridges for both pistols and rifles (I was already a re-loader), then to a percussion rifle and ultimately to a flintlock rifle. My last BP acquisition is the civil war era (replica) paper cartridge Robinson Sharps carbine. Oh, and a single shot dueling pistol (percussion cap) along the way. Now I need a flintlock pistol.

    I have to say though, and intending NO OFFENSE to anyone else here, but I do not understand the modern version of the muzzleloaders. I really enjoy the (reproduction versions of) original style BP rifles and pistols of the by-gone eras. There are some challenges, but they are a hoot to own and shoot.
     
  7. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I've been thinking about one for a year or two now but haven't purchased anything yet. I've shot a few and it was always fun, just a lot of cleaning afterwards.
     
  8. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    Traditions Performance Firearms
    Revolver for $150. Check out the closeouts in the "special offers" link at the upper right of the website. They had at least one rifle for about $200, if you are lookin to stretch your deer season a bit.
     
  9. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Re: Casting bullets- the "pour molten lead from a great height into water" technique is used for making shotgun shot. for lead balls- or the cylindrical bullets I make, you melt lead in a melting pot, scoop it up in a dipper, and pour into a bullet mold. A muzzle loader uses PURE, butter soft lead. I also cast bullets for .357 and 9mm, using wheelweights as my basic metal.

    Not a difficult process, saves a buncha money for reloaders, quite safe as long as you follow the 3 rules- read the book first, follow the directions, and do not try to mooch my source of wheelweights (3 local tire shops swap me a bucket of weights for a 6 pack of Miller) Find a copy of the Cast Bullet Handbook.

    PS- I scored 150 lbs of pure lead foil at a govt surplus auction a few years back- for 50 cents. Have enuff to feed my muzzleloaders until I am 99. Will have to get more then. :rolleyes:
     
  10. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    I hunt with an inline modern bp rifle because I can and I never got into the percussion or flint rifles. I am actually staying away from them because I know I will end up loving them and we know where that leads.

    The pistols are just a hoot and Spitty is right about the cleaning afterwards. But that is all part of the fun. :)
     
  11. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    This wasn't in Roswell, NM was it?
    :D
     
  12. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Roswell? No, it was at some place called Area 51..................:p

    Actually, Bellwood Defense General Supply Center, near Richmond VA. Dental x-ray film came in these little foil pouches. Lead foil.

    Roswell just had tin foil. Shaped like hats.........:)
     
  13. Sagetown

    Sagetown New Member

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    Yep; black powder shootin is fun. I especially like the old Colt Army revolvers. UBERTI makes a very close reproduction of the original, but PIETTA guns are really sweet.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. TnRebel

    TnRebel New Member

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    I pour my own balls and make my own paper cartridges , and the fun is shooting a good group with the revolver and bring down a deer or hag with the rifle
     
  15. Slickrick214

    Slickrick214 New Member

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    Black powder guns are very fun to shoot. They are pretty accurate for hunting and the .45, .50, .58, .69 or .75 caliber bullet will easily take down a deer. As a Civil War re-enactor I buy pre-rolled paper blanks from "sutlers." These are nice when your shooting blanks but the diameter of the paper tube is very small. Not nearly enough to wrap a .58 caliber mini ball for my Enfield. It would be to small for any black powder rifle caliber out there. You would have to take apart the paper tube and re-roll it. Your best bet is to make your own rounds using caliber correct moulds and rolling your own tubes using cigartte paper.
     
  16. saviorslegacy

    saviorslegacy New Member

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    You people who make your own balls are awesome.
    The only thing that keeps you from being completely self efficient is powder.
    So tell me, does anyone make their own powder?
     
  17. TnRebel

    TnRebel New Member

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    I have used this method and got good results , but a lot of work .

    How to Make Black Powder


    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtHKiRdtEGc]YouTube - How to make black powder with a mortar and pestle[/ame]
     
  18. deth502

    deth502 New Member

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    ive made my own bp, as well as my own percussion caps.

    im far from an expert, but i do have a "go-to guy" on another forum that seems to know everything.

    afa using patched balls, maxi balls, sabots, ect, its not just a matter of choice, there are MANY different nuiances made into different bbls to make one more suited to one type of projectile. he gave me a very indepth run down on it once, but frankly, most of it went over my head. but keep in mind that things like twist rate, number of lands/groves, ratio of the sizes of the lands/groves, rifling depth, actual bore diameter, and other factors determine what type of ammo the gun is designed to shoot. if you get a new inline type designed to work with sabots, dont be suprised if your patched balls and paper cartridges cant hit the broad side of a barn.
     
  19. TnRebel

    TnRebel New Member

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    + 1 on that the video I posted was only used in my 1861 Army Colt replica .

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2010