Archery anyone?

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by Franciscomv, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    I've been an avid bow hunter since I was a small kid. I've never enjoyed any of the modern compound "bows" with their awful pulleys and gimmicks. I love traditional bows, a take down recurve is as modern as I'll go.

    Right now my most used bow is a custom 60# longbow by a local maker (P U M A :: Arquería : arcos tradicionales : longbows, recurvados, take down, it's their Willwaw model). I'm thinking about placing an order for a 70 or 75# recurve from them as well.

    I'll post pics later (I'm at work now).

    Any other bowhunters here?
     
  2. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Yes, I bow hunt. I use the modern crossbow. I'm left handed and right eyed so I've always had problems with any other bows. I shoot right handed. I know some guys that are just great shots with long bows and recurves. Pretty cool stuff, imo.
     

  3. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    They're currently trying to make this legal for hunting in my state.
     

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  4. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I've been wanting to get a Wii for that very reason. ;)

    I don't like compound bows either; i did enjoy longbow activities in my youth.
     
  5. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I'll be taking on my first season bow hunting deer this year....I can't wait!!
     
  6. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    There's tons of evidence that the Mayans used those. When done right, accurate and deadly. I doubt the death comes quicly enough to be considered an ethical weapon. Evolution, my friend. :cool:
     
  7. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Francisco - what are the prices on those Puma bows? I have compound bows but would like to get a longbow or recurve. They are not common shelf items at sporting goods retailers where I live.
     
  8. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    RL357, they are around $300-400 depending on the model. They make a pretty good product, but you should check around for local bowyers (these guys are down here in Argentina!).

    Skullcrusher, there's a guy at my club that shoots olives with his long bow. He even has a video in which he shoots a bloody aspirin! I only beat him once at a 3D tournament. I'm an OK archer, I don't take it seriously enough to excel, minute of a bunny is plenty accurate for what I enjoy doing.
     
  9. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Why is the fascination with flinging sticks at animals?
     
  10. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    While I support the rights of responsible hunters, I agree here. I refuse to take out an animal if I couldn't do it with precision and a minimum of suffering.

    I've never seen an arrow take down an animal without a chase involved.

    Is an instant kill within the realm of possibility using these methods?
     
  11. zhuk

    zhuk New Member

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    It's not always animals...archery is target shooting too.


    Resident amazon who goes to my krav maga class with her longbow:

    [​IMG]


    About the only weapon you DON'T have to have a license for here (though in the eastern states you must have a licence for a crossbow)
     
  12. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    Thanks Francisco. I was just interested in finding out the current value of a long bow. The father of the guy who introduced me to archery had a recurve made for him out in Wyoming many years ago and paid almost $600 back then. He only shoots hand made cedar shafts which also cost a small fortune. Puma's pricing is very good!
     
  13. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    There is MUCH less pain, trauma, and suffering when a deer is hit with a razor sharp broadhead as opposed to the hydraulic shock caused by a highspeed HP projectile making mush of it's internal organs. If the hunter remains still after the shot, often times a deer hit properly will stand there looking around after being arrowed, not knowing what happened. This never happens with a gun-shot deer. With a properly sharpened broadhead, it dies due to loss of blood pressure instead of a traumatic bullet wound. Some people claim that an arrow shot deer actually tastes better due to the lack of adrenaline pumped into the tissue as a result of the fight and flight response. Of course not all deer are shot with perfect arrow placement, but neither are gun hunters the marksmen they would like to be.
     
  14. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    This is where the individual hunter's ethics come in. I can't speak for all bow hunters, but I've got a golden rule: I'd rather spend a nice day walking around in the woods and return home with nothing to show for it than take a bad shot at my prey.

    Most of the fun in bowhunting (at least to me) is the actual stalking, having to work your way to 20 or 30 yards of a wild animal without being detected and position yourself for that perfect shot. A well placed arrow, with a carefully chosen and sharpened broadhead, will work very quickly.

    I tried rifle hunting, it's not my thing. I'd only do it for meat since it's effective, but I definetely prefer knives or bows for sport. I've been aching to try out handgun hunting with open sights (seems like a fantastic excuse for a .44 magnum single action!).

    At the end of the day, I guess the trophy isn't that important to me. I just enjoy woods-bumming and chasing critters around.
     
  15. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Every hunter I know will not take a shot if they feel that it won't be a quick and fatal one. RL is correct about arrow shots. I've seen deer hit with a slug that has run for more than 100 yds just off adrenaline rush.
     
  16. Benning Boy

    Benning Boy New Member

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    I've got far more respect for guys that let one go as opposed to taking the bad shot.

    For me personally, I see more and more sh***y hunters as time goes on. I was raised that hunting was done with a degree of reverence for the prey. I'll tramp through gamelands today, and see a ton of decapitated carcasses from @$$holes who take a rack and discard the rest.

    We have farms around here that will have guys on quads drive deer into open fields for you to shoot with minimal effort on your part.

    Aerial wolf hunts sicken me, simply for the fact that guys pay to be flown around to run an animal to exhaustion, then land and finish it off. I see a huge difference between hunting as a skill, and killing for the fun of it.

    I think I just ranted. Sorry.:eek:

    But at least I now have a clearer understanding of the broadhead.
     
  17. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    That is my problem with hunting.

    Every year we have guys that come into the shop the week before they are set to go out hunting with the boys for a quickie scope mount or a trigger job. And they need the thing back by Thursday so they can go "sight it in" before they leave on Friday night. :mad:

    To me, a hunter should be a skilled and accurate marksman first, and a meat taker second. Firing off 5 shots a week before you go hunting and then taking a cold bore shot, usually at an up or down angle, isn't responsible hunting to me.

    Anyone that hunts for a trophy, with no respect for the meat or the animal, has no business on my side of the line.

    I would agree that game taken by a bow hunter, that is a true marksman and drops the animal with a well placed shot, does taste a bit cleaner, a bit less gamey, to me personally.

    JD
     
  18. skullcrusher

    skullcrusher New Member

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    Well put, both JD and Benning. There are some unscrupulous people that hunt. I see it around me as well. Personally, I don't hunt trophies. I do hunt for meat, and I (and my family) eat what I kill. I kill legally and ethically. I remove the tenderloin and sirloin. The rest, I grind and make summer sausage, bratwurst, etc. Damn fine eating. The trick to keeping the gamey taste out is to trim all of the fat away.
     
  19. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    I've been a bowhunter a long time and can testify that any animal properly hit with a scary sharp broadhead of good design will not feel pain. I've even had deer flinch at the impact, then actually go back to eating or simply walk a few steps & just fall over (with full passthru). No less than 95% of the animals drop within sight, and usually less than 50 yards.

    There's nothing inhumane about bowhunting. In fact, an animal will usually drop with more regularity than with some firearm wounds. An broadhead kills by the animal bleeding to death, which occurs within the course of a few seconds, and usually leave a blood trail a blind man could follow. Whereas a firearm kills from shock, or transferring energy from expansion of the bullet. It's been over 30 years since I lost an animal that was hit with an arrow.

    There's many reasons to learn to bowhunt but I can personally guarantee that a skilled bowhunter that stalks his quarry will be a MUCH better/more skilled hunter than someone that just blasts away with a high power centerfire rifle. Sure it's harder to successfully harvest an animal regularly with a bow than it is with a rifle-therein lies the enjoyment of a challenge well met.
     
  20. RL357Mag

    RL357Mag New Member

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    +1. I shoot about 25 arrows a day starting in July/August to get ready for the early bow season. My personal limit is 30 yds. I don't need the meat, and I don't hunt for racks, so some years I won't take a deer, and that's fine because the experience of being outdoors before dawn is worth just as much as the "kill". You see things in the woods that most people will never see. Last year while sitting in a stand I watched a hawk swoop down on a squirrel - he missed and the squirrel got away, and then proceeded to bark for the next 30 minutes effectively ruining my hunt...I get as much fun taking shots at squirrels with the bow and bludgeon points as I do deer hunting - it makes me a better shot.