Applied Mathematics for Shooters Course

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by hoovco, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. hoovco

    hoovco New Member

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    I'm putting together a course pertaining to the mathematics of long range and precision shooting and just doing a little market research. I'm wondering if people would be interested in such a course and if anyone thinks it would actually be worth putting into a block of instruction. Opinions?
     
  2. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    Yes definitely! I hate math and would still take the course.
     

  3. hoovco

    hoovco New Member

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    Think it's worth 50 bucks a head to start out?
     
  4. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    You talking an online class or a local in person class?
     
  5. KJG67

    KJG67 New Member

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    What's your syllabus looking like? Will it be math for dummies, because that would be great. Price? Have to know more.
     
  6. hoovco

    hoovco New Member

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    It would be an in person class. It would cover the mathematics of things like high angle shooting, spin drift, mil vs moa, wind formulas, time of flight, etc.
     
  7. DeltaF

    DeltaF New Member

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    If I were in your position I'd find out what the local ranges are charging hour for hour for their classes. Then I'd knock a little money off that at first, maybe $10 to be competitive and raise the price to be equal to theirs after I had a few classes under my belt.

    Then to drum up interest I'd make up some fliers that describe the class and advertise that FIRST TIME ONLY the first X number of people to call and register get in for free (small sample size of the crowd you're going for) and print up fliers for all the ranges to post on the boards.

    I'd also print up some coupons with a slight discount to give to the people I talked to face to face.
     
  8. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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  9. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    I would be. Are you talking mathematics dealing with concepts such as laminar flow and boundary layers, Magnus effect, etc. or more about the calculation of MOA, ballistic tables, etc.? I'm interested in either case.
     
  10. JackieBrown13

    JackieBrown13 New Member

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    Count me in! ILOVE physics
     
  11. wittmeba

    wittmeba New Member

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    I'm no physics major but it could be interesting. I'd love to understand the variables of snipers :)

    But I don't understand this - from the "Coriolis Effect":

    Doesn't make sense to me. When does class start?
     
  12. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    The earth rotates would be the simplest way to explain.
     
  13. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    Here's an animation showing the effect (from Wikimedia Commons). If you're looking standing over the shooter and the target, you'll see a similar effect (though not anywhere near as exaggerated in this image).

    There are other effects acting on a projectile that are greater or lesser than the Coriolis effect, including drag, the Magnus effect, etc.. Many of these forces are insignificant, but cumulatively on long distance shots, they certainly affect the projectile. It floors me when I think of folks who can innately account for all these variables in 5 heartbeats.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Steel_Talon

    Steel_Talon New Member

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    I think, you need to tailor it to a specific group of "advanced" shooters.. But also offer some of it at a pabulum level for the general shooter, Such as how to understand and use Mil. correctly, same for MOA. How to use a mil scope to determine distance to animal target
     
  15. wittmeba

    wittmeba New Member

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    mountainman13,

    I fully understand the earths rotation having an effect. But why always to the right when in the northern hemisphere and left when in the southern hemisphere? I think there is an error in the statement. Should it read to the right if shooting south from the northern hemisphere and left if shooting north from the southern hemisphere?

    If you stand on the north pole and shoot toward the equator the point of aim will be shifted due to the earths rotation. Assuming your trajectory is straight it will land right of point of aim. Equator is moving right when viewing the earth. From the north pole it is moving left so your shot would land right of the point of aim.
     
  16. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Good point. Idk I'm No expert.
     
  17. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Maybe this will help understand. The water in a toilet swirls in an opposite direction in the Southern Hemisphere. Long Range riflemen are not just good shots. They are also good math students. :)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_force