Anyone Use Polishing Stones?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing Forum' started by MrCarson, Jul 27, 2014.

  1. MrCarson

    MrCarson New Member

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  2. bradam

    bradam Member

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    Which rifles parts would you be using them on?
     

  3. MrCarson

    MrCarson New Member

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    I would use them for getting pits out, little parts like hammer, trigger, trigger guard and any other awkward thing like that. A few students have recommended getting a set of stones but no one has specified which brand or kind. We use sandpaper (with WD-40) and blocks of wood and that works well for big areas but for the little areas it's a little tough. In semester 4 we will be doing things like trigger jobs and they say stones work really well for that.
     
  4. bradam

    bradam Member

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    I have a similar type of stone I use on my ss knife. I think they would work great on fire control parts and polishing in general as long as one is very careful. What about using the round type for feed ramps? Anyone?
     
  5. 7.62 Man

    7.62 Man New Member

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  6. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...ep-coloring/stones/india-stones-prod9618.aspx

    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...on-premium-hard-arkansas-stones-prod9627.aspx

    For smoothing/polishing larger areas like the sides of triggers and hammers, use a "bench" stone. Trying to see-saw your way across a wide surface with a narrow stone will leave an uneven surface.

    Don't forget honing OIL as well. Some stones are used dry, some use oil, others use water for lubrication and to keep the stone from loading up.

    A feed ramp would have to be in pretty bad shape to require stoning, but yes it's been done. Fine sandpaper wrapped around a wooden dowel works too. A final (high) polish would be done (very carefully) using a felt bob and polishing compound in most cases I believe. A mirror finish is nice, but not absolutely necessary.

    What is the point of paying tuition to a school that has "instructors" that don't instruct? Don't they give you a list of the basic tools you'll need to complete the course? :confused:

    JMHO here, but any instructor that puts a power tool into the hands of a novice gun smithing student need to be taken out in back of the wood shed for a lesson of his own.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014
  7. bradam

    bradam Member

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    I went on brownells. thier round files for polishing feed ramps are from india and in the chat they could not give me any information on the grit size. I am not comfortable with the lack of information. Do you have any?
     
  8. MrCarson

    MrCarson New Member

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    Thanks everyone.
     
  9. Chainfire

    Chainfire Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well to tell the truth, my hammer does have some pitting, and it has been a long time since I had my stones polished. Getting old ain't all its cracked up to be.
     
  10. USMC_Grunt

    USMC_Grunt New Member

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    Polishing with stones is an art-form which takes quite bit of practice to become good at. It's not hard but you have to be a patient person with a sharp eye. The process is very time consuming and tedious, but the results are very cool.

    The following link is a pretty good article on learning to polish with stones:

    http://www.moldmakingtechnology.com/articles/teach-yourself-polishing

    Feed ramps should be polished with round or half-round stones. edged stones will gouge the s**t out of a feed ramp.
     
  11. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    The stones aren't "from India," they are called "India" stones.
    India stones are usually about 320 grit. I use cheap Japanese water stones, diamond files and diamond lapping plates in my cutlery restoration business. For gunsmithing, fine India and hard Arkansas stones work well. Wet/dry sandpaper is good to have around, too.
     
  12. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Polishing trigger parts is something that is risky to do without a proper jig. If you round off a part it can become dangerous. I do not mean you have to visibly round off the part. The edges of gun parts are squared off.

    I will not buy a gun that has had a trigger job done on it unless the seller can produce a receipt from a properly equipped shop. We have a shop here that does nothing but trigger jobs. You seldom see someone with a stone working like Geppetto.