Anyone ever tried this? Is it too far fetched?

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by supra001, Jan 28, 2010.

  1. supra001

    supra001 New Member

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    I posted this on a different forum and I'm trying to get varying opinions and want to throw it at you here. For starters, I'm glad to be part of your community, thanks for having me. I recently purchased a S&W M&P 9mm std. and I'm truly thrilled with it. But here's a question I have concerning a cleaning method, and wonder if anyone's ever done this or heard of another that does this. After field stripping the pistol, submerge the polymer chassis in a mild soapy water bath and scrub the action with a nylon brush to clean it and then rinse well with fresh water. Knowing the materials involved in the chassis makeup (polymer plastics and stainless steel), I'm intrigued by the thought that this isn't necessarily a big no-no, provided you're very diligent in the drying step using compressed shop air (filtered) and leaving the pistol disassembled for a period of time for an extra measure of certainty that it is throughly dry, and then of course a good oiling/lube for the action area. Sounds nuts, but why not?? Gunsmiths, anyone? Thanks for any input.
     
  2. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I used to wash my black powder revolver in the sink with dish soap and hot water. But that's a bit different.

    It will probably work for you, but why bother?

    Btw, welcome to the FTF community. When you get a chance, head over to the new member introductions and introduce yourself to the gang.
     

  3. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    I have an Ultrasonic Weapons Tank.

    You put hot water and a soap solution in the tank, turn up the Ultrasonic frequency and let the weapon parts sit for about 8 to 10 minutes.

    Then I take them to the sink, wash them in hot water and get the soap off.

    Then I take them back to the tank, fill it with lubricant recommended by the manufacturer.

    In over 4 years, I have had ZERO problems, no matter what weapon parts I put in there.

    JD
     
  4. supra001

    supra001 New Member

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    I guess the driving (or at least one of them) factor is the outrageous costs of the "polymer safe" solvents. Of course I use the solvents and cleaners liberally on the Stainless Steel Barrel/Slide and Structural Components, but then try to be extremely careful around the polymer when cleaning with the same products. To me it wouldn't be a bother using soapy water and drying as a method of cleaning if it proved to be effective. Just the mere statement of "firearms and water/moisture" would cause most any gun owner to shudder, but when you look at the technical aspect of it, (polymer, stainless steel, water) it shouldn't be a concern to believe this is acceptable means of cleaning a polymer chassis. I have yet to do this, but if or when I do, I'll give feedback on the outcome.
     
  5. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    You can clean polymer with hoppe's and it's cheap.
     
  6. Mr. Bluesky

    Mr. Bluesky New Member

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    Aye, I just use the Hoppe's stuff on my M&P, works like a charm.
     
  7. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Depending on the level of filth, the use of dish soap and warm water is not only a good idea but many times a must!

    Be sure to use plenty of fresh water to remove all soap residue.

    The key is the drying process. This is most easily completed when the assembly is reduced to parts. The use of "shop air" is critical for achieving total dryness. Don't have a compressor and 100# air plumbed into your work area? Simple, buy a can of computer compressed gas for dust removal.

    A hair dryer set on low or cool will do a good job as well.

    Don't wait too long to get a light coat of lube, LCP or wax on your clean parts.

    NOTE: DO NOT USE a product like ArmorAll on any part of your weapon! You will regret it's use!!!
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2010
  8. MB44

    MB44 New Member

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    I always cleaned my tupperware :D like that.. mild soap and warm water,...
     
  9. supra001

    supra001 New Member

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    Canebrake, Thanks for the vote of confidence I've been looking for. I just can't see how doing this properly could be detrimental...
     
  10. supra001

    supra001 New Member

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    Mr. Bluesky, and any other S&W semi-auto owners, be advised that in the owners manual for an M&P, I ran across an advisory to never use ammoniated solvents on any S&W firearm. I've been researching the MSDS for several solvents and Hoppe's #9 has listed ammonium hydroxide (35ppm). I emailed S&W Tech Support and asked specifically about #9 and it wasn't recommended by them. Here's their recommendation quoted: "Hoppe's Elite, or Breakfree, or MPRO7 will work fine on the M&P". Surely it would take extreme misuse of something like #9 to realize any detrimental effects, but I don't think I'll take any chances.
     
  11. macdiesel

    macdiesel New Member

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    Onething to certainly watch out for is the region that you live in. I live in Hawaii and stainless just doesn't have the same meaning here. I've seen stainless rust with no signs mioster getting to it. Here its so humid all the time that I'm not sure you could garanty get the water out of all the little nooks and crannies. If you live on a southern coastline, I would think the same rules would apply. Just my $0.02
     
  12. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

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    I never understood why people think you cant get a carbon steel gun wet. When you shoot corrosive ammunition you clean the bore with warm soapy water. Black powder guns are cleaned with soapy water. In WWII back at base camps rifles were removed from the wood and metal parts put into tubs of boiling water to clean them. I have a cop friend with a S&W 4006 and he disassembles his gun after, going to the range, and puts it in his automatic dishwasher. I have had totally mudsoaked guns in the field I washed out in a mountain stream. The key is to let them dry and oil them up as soon as possible.
     
  13. User Name

    User Name New Member

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    I dont use any solvents on my Glock, I wipe everything down with a dry cloth, run the brush down the barrel till its clean and re oil it. Never EVER had a problem. Thats what Glock actually recommends. They say you shouldnt have to use solvent unless the firearm hasnt been cleaned for so long that it has caked on stuff in certain areas.
     
  14. macdiesel

    macdiesel New Member

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    When I see a 2 gal dehumidifier tank go from empty to full in 4 hours I worry. But you're right, as long as you clean, thoroughly dry and immediately oil it'll be fine.
     
  15. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    After washing the gun, shake it dry. Then, saturate it with WD 40 to remove residual moisture. Shake the WD 40 out, and blot the gun dry. Lubricate it, and reassemble.
     
  16. CornCod

    CornCod Member

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    I have a CZ-52 I shoot corrosive ammo through. If I want to get all the water out I use my wife's hair dryer.
     
  17. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Mac is right- In Hawai'i, steel is considered biodegradable!

    Real key is gong to be did your cleaning solvent (be it Hoppes #9 or ElectroSol with Lemon!) dissolve whatever you meant it to dissolve? Carbon from powder residue is one thing, salts from corrosive primers another, lead/copper fouling another, and taco sauce another (I TOLD you quit keeping your lunch in my range box!)

    The kettle full of hot water and M1 Garands was for a reason- much Garand ammo WAS corrosive primed. It WILL take care of the chlorate salts, and with some soap, powder residue- but not metal fouling. Ultrasonics clean everything. My .50 Hawken HAS no copper fouling- only dead soft lead bullets and REAL black powder- Dawn and hot water the way to go.

    Whatever you use, dry it well and lube it after. Buy your OWN blow dryer for the shop instead of swiping Mom's- you'll thank me for that later!
     
  18. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    A heat gun costs $10 from Harbor Freight.
    Be very careful using it on plastic guns, though!