anyone ever have a dog lose its hearing due to shooting?

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by comeback_kid, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. comeback_kid

    comeback_kid New Member

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    I took my dog hunting yesterday. He has always been accustomed to 12 gauge shots and .22 long rifle. Before we left I decided to shoot my 1911 at a target. For the first 10 or so rounds he stood right beside me and I noticed after the first shot he kinda put his tail in between his legs but continued to hang around. Eventually he went back and got in the truck (about 30 yards behind me) and I shot about 50 more rounds. When I went home I noticed he was deaf. Literally deaf. Even today he still can't hear worth a damn. His hearing has improved slightly but its still far from 100%. I'm taking him to the vet tomorrow but I was wondering if anyone has ever had this happen and if the dog recovered its hearing. Thanks.
     
  2. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    You know, I always wondered about this, too. We wear hearing protection when we shoot but dog's hearing is so much more sensitive than ours I wonder how they ALL don't go deaf. Is a shotgun much quieter than a handgun? I haven't shot enough shotguns to notice.
     

  3. comeback_kid

    comeback_kid New Member

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    Yea, I shoot my 12 gauge often while hunting without hearing protection. It is loud but it doesn't make my ears ring. That .45 will make my ears ring pretty bad if I shoot without hearing protection. A dog having a much more sensitive sense of hearing is probably more prone to serious damage. However I have seen YouTube videos with people shooting around their dogs all the time. If I had known he would go deaf I never would have done it. I have been doing research and I have found many people with the same issue but they never came back and specified whether or not their dogs regained their hearing. I feel terrible about this and am hoping for the best. He seems happy as can be, he's just deafer than a worm. And like I've said I've shot other guns around him all the time and hes never gone noticeably deaf because of it. I am anxious to see what the vet says. I doubt there's anything they can do but I'm not a vet so I wouldn't know.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2012
  4. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I've heard lots of stories about duck dogs going deaf. I think its sad that we don't have some kind of hearing protection for them. I won't hunt with a dog myself, and usually won't shoot with one around, mostly because I no longer have a dog but also because the only dog I get to spend any time with is my mom's and he's scared to death of guns, runs and hides everytime they come out. Its probably because of the noise.

    I wouldn't let my son or my wife shoot without hearing protection, and I think its only fair and right that a man treat his animals as family. Unless of course its livestock being raised for food, its kind of awkward eating billy the pig.
     
  5. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    My sister raised beef steers and she named them. We had no problem eating some delicious "Bucky Burgers". :eek:



    I hope, with time, the dog's hearing will come back. A couple times I shot a round forgetting to put on my 'ears'. The ringing stopped after a while and my hearing returned to normal. I hope the same happens for your dog.
     
  6. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

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    I used some inadequate protection and my ears rang for a couple days. Week later, I still have problems with certain frequencies sounding like a bell. That and my blue tooth sounds weird. Things are slowly getting better tho. Hopefully the OP dog is only experiencing a temporary problem.
     
  7. comeback_kid

    comeback_kid New Member

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    He can hear certain sounds fine. Like the sound of me working the pump on my shotgun, clicking my tongue, or opening a door. What he doesn't hear is our voices and other sounds. I'll find out today. You're right trip- it's only fair to protect our dogs ears- especially considering their ears are even more sensitive than ours. Had I known he would go deaf I wouldn't have even considered it. I assumed that since he was fine around a 12 gauge, something a little louder wouldn't noticeably damage his hearing. That and I've seen hickok45 (YouTube shooter) vids with the dog standing beside him with seemingly no ill effect. Obviously it was a stupid assumption on my part. I'm hoping the vet will give me some good news today, and hopefully someone can learn from this experience.
     
  8. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Our maybe I can make a coupe million by inventing doggie ear pro. I've got some ideas already, the question is whether or not the dog will tolerate it.
     
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i will venture an opinion and thought. all those years of shooting in the past i did have caused some hearing loss that i will probably never get back, along with all those years of working with heavy and loud equipment at work. so now there are times when i can hear you talking, but i can't understand the words you say. i am sure that a dog could be just as likely to have the same problems as we do if exposed to it for long enough. with a dog hearing also at higher frequencies, they may be more likely to have hearing loss at a permenent level sooner.
     
  10. comeback_kid

    comeback_kid New Member

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    In hind sight it was careless. The percussive blast or whatever the hell you call it from a .45 is quite a bit nastier than that of a 12 gauge. Hopefully I didn't rupture his ear drums. I'm only 19 but back when I was younger and dumber I've been to the firing range without ear pro as well as numerous concerts as well as loud music through headphones or in my car. My ears always got better after a few days, but undoubtedly there has been some permanent damage. I too can hear people talking but struggle to make out what they are saying. Although I think some people just talk too low and quiet. It may be my hearing. Careless mistakes
     

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    Last edited: Jan 5, 2012
  11. Mosin

    Mosin Well-Known Member

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    Someone should forward this info to PETA, if they get their mind on protecting animal hearing, good lord... we could have fully legal suppressors on sale in a few years.:D
     
  12. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Dogs and shooting

    Heres a pic of one our dogs during during shooting.
    for the most part they stand behind the shooter so muzzle blast isnt as bad.
     

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  13. comeback_kid

    comeback_kid New Member

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    nice pics. Looks like a fun time. I love the snow- it's a rare occurrence here though. My dog thinks that when I pull a gun out I am about to kill something. So he runs in the direction of where I am shooting. I am not careless enough to shoot with my dog standing next to the target, but I did fire a shot off when he was right at my feet to the front of me. Sadly, that's probably the blast that did it. Suppressors becoming legal would be cool but if PETA found out about this they would hang me. "YOU ARE TAKING A DOG HUNTING?! TO KILL ANIMALS!!! AND THEN YOU SHOOT GUNS AROUND YOUR DOG?!? WITHOUT PROTECTING HIS EARS!" I would end up looking like the most negligent, horrible person in existence.
     
  14. Rex in OTZ

    Rex in OTZ Well-Known Member

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    Living up north

    yes the daughter has pretty much taken over the Hi-Point 995 carbine
    she can out shoot most guys with SKS's at the extreme range of the 9mm round, The pooches are free to range round while shooting, for the most part they stay away from the target area.
    As a kid in Rural Middle West our dogs would get all excited when we walked out carrying a Rifle or Shotgun they knew they'd be in on the hunt and get all wound up happy to go hunting with the humans.
    Coon hunting was always fun with dogs.

    Skunk and Porcupine experences not so nuch.
    Eventually had a female (non *****) Airedale Terrior developed a talent for killing porcupines and placing them on the porch steps without getting quills.

    Dad's Weimaraner had a vendetta against every racoon he ever came across, that dog would eat through a granery door to get at a coon if one was in there.
     
  15. comeback_kid

    comeback_kid New Member

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    my Pup's the same way- if he sees a gun- or even a shotgun shell or rifle cartridge- he gets jumpy and excited and ready to go. He certainly isn't gun shy. I just feel terrible about damaging his hearing like that. The good news is, he seems to be getting better. I will be taking him to the vet in an hour. There has been much improvement since the day of the incident so that is a good sign.

    UPDATE- the vet just made the easiest 30 dollars anyone has ever made off of me. He said "only time will tell". He did verify that his ear drums were not ruptured. I am hoping that it will get better; his hearing is better than it was yesterday, which was better than it was the day before. So I am hoping that in a week he will have 90% of his hearing back. That might just be wishful thinking.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2012
  16. comeback_kid

    comeback_kid New Member

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    For future reference My dog seems to have made a full recovery. Last time I do that
     
  17. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    My hearing is badly damaged. Deaf in one ear and can't hear out of the other. My boys have been taught to carry hearing protection in their pockets at all times and stick 'em in their ears when things get at all noisy. I wish I had been taught that when I was young. My dogs are not allowed on the range. We do not hunt with the dogs, but if we did I would be stuffing cotton in their ears. Those little roll-up foam earplugs made for humans wouldn't work for beans.
     
  18. kfox75

    kfox75 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Test subjects available!

    If you can make a set of doggy ear plugs Trip, I have two very willing test subjects here. I can't open the gun safe without both of my labs spazzing out.

    Don't be too hard on yourself Kid. I've had beagles and labs most of my life, and have had this happen a few times. All of my dogs still had decent hearing when they passed on. I'm glad to hear your buddy is recovering.

    One thought on the pistol theory; the distance between the dog and the muzzel may have been a contributing factor, as could the type of propelant. Just a thought.
     
  19. comeback_kid

    comeback_kid New Member

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    Yea I ain't gonna quit takin him hunting but he won't be anywhere near me next time I shoot my .45, ill even be hesitant shooting the 12 gauge if he's real close by. Luckily most of our hunting (with the dog) is done with a .22 lr.

    I do beleieve the damage was done due to his position when I was shooting and the fact I fired multiple times.
     
  20. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    I think I damaged the hearning of one of my dogs a long time ago. I was shooting a .357 mag and only fired about three times. My dog's hearing never seemed to be he same after that and eventually he became totally deaf. I felt pretty bad about that and I have never shot with a dog around again. Once when I thought I might have to use one of my handguns I told my daughter to put her hands over the ears of the dog that was with us. I didn't have to shoot.