Anyone Bought Flints Recently ?

Discussion in 'Blackpowder & Musket' started by sheriffjohn, Sep 14, 2019.

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  1. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm apparently getting really low on flints, as I can only find six in the garage that swallows all.
    Admittedly, I've not bought any in uh...years. Thought I had a cache but can't find it. I just need regular "medium" rifle/pistol size and prefer the hand-knapped English flints we bought from Dixie Gunworks back in the day.

    Anyone have thoughts ? Bought Any ? Thanks !
     
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  2. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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  3. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the info . I've whittled down to four flinters I want to shoot. Two use "medium", one "musket", and one "pistol" size. One friend used to re-knap but he's long dead. We tried some apparently made by lapidary methods but they look decidedly odd to me. I can't find them in my stuff, anyway.
     
  4. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    gee, back in the day folks found them, and it didn't cost them anything. and being in Missouri they are common as dirt.

    speaking of which, the entire planet is made of dirt so why do folks buy it?
     
  5. towboater

    towboater Well-Known Member

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    Ya got to own the property to take the dirt. About the same for flint, i suppose.
     
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  6. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    True enough we have plenty of "flint". Knapping them is not in my skill set. The ones from back in the day were from some source in England, have a sort of greasy appearance and lasted quite a while. I'm curious as to the current supply's reviews from shooters.
     
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  7. W.T. Sherman

    W.T. Sherman Well-Known Member

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    sounds like maybe you should add that to your skill set :D


    I highly doubt that those pioneers that lived in the middle of the wilderness (the mid-west and beyond) had stores or mail order to get them :D
     
  8. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They were good at lots of things we have lost the knowledge/skill/willingness to undertake. Well, either they were good or dead. My daughter can forage for wild food - mushrooms and various plants. I have to take field guides with me. They drank crick water, walked mostly, and avoided getting scalped whenever possible. To that lifestyle I say "Nay-Nay". They ate stuff I wouldn't put in my hand and mostly didn't have much to eat a lot of the time.

    I like to still-hunt with my old timey guns, but I doubt I'd be good at skulking when hostiles were about. Most of the "flint" we have around here is chert, very brittle.
     
  9. KITANDTASK

    KITANDTASK Member

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    I STARTED TO WONDER HOW RICH I AM IF I WERE TO HAVE MONEY AND ALL I COULD BUY WITH IT OR SHOULD TRY TO BUY WITH IT IS SOMETHING THAT WOULD BE FREE IF I KNEW HOW TO OBTAIN IT MYSELF.

    I LEARNED THAT I LIKE SOME OF THE SKILLS I LEARNED OVER MY YEARS INCLUDING HOW TO START A FIRE AND COOK. I MADE MYSELF SOME GOOD FOOD THAT I CAN NOT FIND ON SOME RESTAURANTS' MENUS BEFORE. I ALSO LEARNED HOW TO DO MY OWN LAUNDRY WITHOUT A MACHINE WHICH CUTS DOWN ON THE LAUNDRY BILL.

    I LIKE SOME GOOD INGREDIENTS FOR FOOD AND GOOD NATURAL MATERIAL LIKE COTON TO WOOL FOR GARMENTS TO LEATHER WHICH IS ESPECIALLY GOOD FOR MAKING FOOTWEAR.

    I DO NOT KNOWETH HOW TO MAKE CLOTHES AND BOOTS WITH THAT STUFF RIGHT NOW BUT IT SEEMS INTERESTING TO ME THE KNOWLEDGE TO DO SOME OF THAT.
     
  10. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Back in the day (40-50 years ago) we had great fun shooting old-timey guns at various gatherings. I still enjoy my black powder guns but the friends that made the hobby fun are long dead. Two flinters were made by friends - one rifle with an original Brown Bess musket lock, the other a 12-gauge long fowler with (I think) a Russ Hamm lock. Percussions are fun but not the challenge provided by flintlocks. Quite a few of the modern "reproductions" are not reproductions at all, but somebody's adaptation of the percussion or flint systems to suit someone's need.

    Fewer and fewer people re-creating the original style guns and the choice available grows thinner every year. Prices for junk seem to go up. Sad.
     
  11. KITANDTASK

    KITANDTASK Member

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    sheriffjohn when you say they are not reproductions do you mean they are not exactly the same as the originals?

    what are the originals supposed to be like?

    i am curious about the flintlock design now.
     
  12. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, for example coil springs in locks don't belong in any original flint nor percussion guns I've ever owned Substituting brass frames for case hardened steel on many of the "reproduction" revolvers irks me as well - partly because brass frames tend to shoot loose eventually and are not historically accurate for Colt and Remingtons but are offered for sale. Some look pretty good until you get up close. I inherited a few "Classic Arms" pistols from my dad - interesting but none reproductions and decidedly inferior in workmanship.

    That being said, there are/were some outstanding percussion and flint firearms produced which are improvements over originals - Tingle Pistols for example, Most Dixie Gunworks rifles and shotguns, Ithaca Hawken Rifles, Jonathan Browning Mountain Rifle (One of my favorites with which I took about 20 deer with), Lyman Rifles and Revolvers, many by custom makers using modern materials, etc.

    For a time, the market saw an influx of modern-made muzzle loaders reportedly made for sale to "natives" in Africa and elsewhere modern guns were not allowed. We had several of those - proof marked but pretty sketchy quality wise. Most were ugly.

    Just like finding old Harleys in someone's barn (we did), finding really nice long rifles, "horse pistols", etc. at yard sales, farm auctions, etc. is a daunting task. In the 60's and 70's (even today) true craftsmen created barrels with gain twists, hand-cut rifling, hand-finished locks, and all sorts of custom features few folks have never seen nor appreciate. I've really enjoyed my blackpowder journey but the folks that made it fun are dead and at age 70, my days of doing many of the things we loved is petty well over. It's easy for me to understand why many hunters have gone to the modern designs but I also know the special fun gained by hunting "old school".
     
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  13. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    I live just a spit and a fart down the road from Brandon in Narfk, historic site of flint-mining and knapping for the last five thousand years or so. If you get permission to go down into the mines, known as 'Grimes graves' a closely-monitored site of special scientific and cultural interest, you can see the work-blunted deer antler picks lying there among the workings where they were discarded by their owners around 4000 - 5000 years ago. Needless to say, the locals are very good at flint-knapping, and that's where every single English flint, used by all of Englands flintlock armies and civilians, got their flints - you too, of course.
     
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  14. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks, Tac . Again, back in the day Turner Kirkland founded Dixie Gunworks specializing in antique and reproduction muzzle loaders. He had connections all over
    Europe and was a huge player in the 60's. About 200 miles from our home, we made a road trip once a year to Tennessee to visit Dixie. Hundreds of antique guns, even cannons were there to actually examine in person. English Flints were of course there and buyers could pick through them to find the best ones. Although Turner is long dead, Dixie is still there in a different location. I bet we shot flints from your area. Small world.
     
  15. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    I have about half a dozen DGW catalogues, and every time I open them I find something I didn't see before. :)
     
  16. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry New Member

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    The last flints I ordered was from Stonewall Creek Outfitters. Also, Track of the Wolf is another supplier. I got sticker shock. Looks like the price of flints follow the cost of percussion caps.
     
  17. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    So how much is too much for you?
     
  18. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry New Member

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    Looks like these good flints are running for most of my locks at $26.00 a dozen. Stocked up and have not had to resupply until now. My locks are from L&R and Davis. Google English flints to check on prices elsewhere. The Stonewall Creek people have done me right in the past.

    Added: The guy that has done my taxes is for years is an old time BP shooter. He keeps a Russ Hamm lock on his desk.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2020
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