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The Artillery Luger Lange Pistole 08 was an adapted version of the standard P.08 Parabellum pistol designed for close combat combat applications. Since it was a better application than having a Rifle at the Artillery Piece while operating the artillery weapon! Since the Stock could be taken off of it and the Pistol and Stock easily stored on the soldier and easily carried and put into use! The Stock significantly improved the close combat accuracy of the Pistol.
Beautiful Piece! I talked to my Brother In Law last evening and he said he still had the Artillery Luger that he inherited. I remember going with my former Father In Law to Kentucky years ago to an older mans farm who had it for sale! It was in excellent condition but did not have a Stock for it! Also notice the Drum Magazine in the Picture! More fire power! For those that might not know what the other item in the Picture is? It is a German Grenade!
Artillery Luger with Stock - Copy.jpg

Artillery Luger and Holster - Copy.jpg

Holster, Stock Compartment, Extra Magazines and Carry Strap!
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The P.08 Lange was intended for use by three distinctly different elements of the German armed forces.

1. Artillery troops - for ease of carrying any form of arm when on horseback.

2. Zeppelin crew.

3. U-boat crew.

Here is my 1918 DWM all-matching example -
243108

...and here is a byf42 Mauser contract model- again, all matching, even the magazine...
243109

...and here are the very last shots I ever fired with it....
243111


They were both deactivated so that I could keep them, but they were sold for a large amount of money about five years ago.
 

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The 514th one made in 1914...
NOT necessarily.

Please look at the front of the frame, and you'll see a lower-case letter over the number.

Production runs began at a001 through a9999, then started over at b001 to b9999 and so on.

Note that for the record the little letter is part of the serial number and should not be ignored.

Many millions of P.08 pistol were made between 1908 and 1945, so it is obvious that you'd need far more serial numbers than 0 - through 9999 and a YOP.

tac
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I always thought a Luger was a Luger was a Luger, but now I realize there were a number of variants.

My "Police" Luger with the sear safety should be here today, hoping to get a call from my FFL anytime now!
 

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NOT necessarily.

Please look at the front of the frame, and you'll see a lower-case letter over the number.

Production runs began at a001 through a9999, then started over at b001 to b9999 and so on.

Note that for the record the little letter is part of the serial number and should not be ignored.

Many millions of P.08 pistol were made between 1908 and 1945, so it is obvious that you'd need far more serial numbers than 0 - through 9999 and a YOP.

tac
Formerly of Lugerforum.com
The Alpha Numeric numbering for Imperial Military lugers start at 1 then go to 10,000 before repeating with a letter prefix. Which reset each year. Mine does not have a letter prefix.
20210610_131506.jpg


But thanks for the reply. It is always important to fact check anyone's claims.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Here's my new toy:

243122


Couple of markings I have no idea what they are:

243123


243124


Disassembled it and the slide rings like a tuning fork when I give it a tap, the barrel is very sharp and clean inside.

I was worried though...when I got home I tried to cock it, the toggle wouldn't budge!!!

There was slight movement in the barrel/slide, enough that I could flip the takedown lever and remove the side plate. I slide the assy off the frame, saw nothing odd, and reassembled the gun. The only thing I can think of was the coupling link(?) must have not been positioned correctly when the seller last did anything to it and shipped it that way. Seems good to go now and I did let him know so he would try to make sure in the future his guns are in good working order.

No birth certificate on this one, so I'm assuming it's a mutt but it's my mutt and I like it. I see nothing that would prevent me from shooting it.
 

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Here's my new toy:

View attachment 243122

Couple of markings I have no idea what they are:

View attachment 243123

View attachment 243124

Disassembled it and the slide rings like a tuning fork when I give it a tap, the barrel is very sharp and clean inside.

I was worried though...when I got home I tried to cock it, the toggle wouldn't budge!!!

There was slight movement in the barrel/slide, enough that I could flip the takedown lever and remove the side plate. I slide the assy off the frame, saw nothing odd, and reassembled the gun. The only thing I can think of was the coupling link(?) must have not been positioned correctly when the seller last did anything to it and shipped it that way. Seems good to go now and I did let him know so he would try to make sure in the future his guns are in good working order.

No birth certificate on this one, so I'm assuming it's a mutt but it's my mutt and I like it. I see nothing that would prevent me from shooting it.
Try this.... Lots of marking explanations..

 

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The Alpha Numeric numbering for Imperial Military lugers start at 1 then go to 10,000 before repeating with a letter prefix. Which reset each year. Mine does not have a letter prefix.But thanks for the reply. It is always important to fact check anyone's claims.
Thank you. I learn something new every day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Thanks tac, haven't quite figured out the Bulgarian connection but I'll give it a try before I ask how do you know!

Just got in 2 Mec-Gar mags, now I have 3 to use at the range.

Couple of years ago I made a simple loader for my Ruger Mk1 22, loading the Luger mags is just as "tingly" on the fingers so I thought I'd make one for the Luger mags as well. This is actually the 22 loader, the 9mm Luger loader is basically the same just bigger. I have it cut out, just haven't painted it yet so that's why I used the 22 loader photo. Think I'll paint the Luger one blue, but maybe a color that's easy to see down in my range bag:

243162
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I enlarged the barrel stamp also. From looking at the online PDF reference book by Aarron Davis "Standard Catalog of Luger" it appears this stamp is a variation of a Berlin Police Armory Acceptance Stamp:

243170
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Question...almost everyone says to take these old guns to a gunsmith to let them check it over. What exactly would a gunsmith do that a person with more than a general knowledge of guns and metals can or would do? Do they do any type of metallurgical testing, or is it mostly eyeballing the gun? Maybe use a couple of gauges the normal shooter wouldn't own? I can see that. But if the gun "seems" to function like it should and there are no visual defects, what are the chances of a gunsmith finding something? Ran a couple of snap caps thru it and it seemed to function normally, the barrel looks good and the tuning fork thing work as described. It's clean, oiled, and seemingly ready for the range.

I went to my primary doctor yesterday for a routine checkup. What a waste of time. All the doc did was check to see if I had any feeling in my feet and if my lungs were working. A drive-thru would have been more comprehensive. I started comparing taking a gun to a gunsmith to this checkup and thought, if all they're going to do is a visual check I feel confident enough to do that myself.

Straighten me out here folks.
 
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