Firearms Talk banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm finally getting my holy grail of firearms, wanted a Luger since I was a kid with a plastic one back in the 50s. I left it in the back window area of my dad's car during the summer and the heat melted it :eek:

Anyway, won a Police Luger off Gun Broker last week and should get it by this weekend. For those that don't know, the police lugers had what they call a sear safety to prevent them from going off if the side plate is removed. Why you would remove the side plate with it loaded is beyond me but hey, I wasn't there.

I'm not a "collector" so serial numbers are not THAT important to me, I do want it to look like a luger and shoot, which the seller sez it is and does.

Made in 1942, appears to have some unnumbered replacement parts (toggle) but all other numbers match I believe except maybe the barrel. I'll know more once it's in my hands.

So all you Luger owners, tell me something about them, what can I expect out of my shooter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nice!!! I already have a holster (new), got it when I bought a Umarex blowback Luger C02 BB gun a few years ago:

243002


Chomping at the bit to get my Luger, I have plenty of 9mm ammo so when I do decide to take it to the range I'm ready to go. Might get another magazine, always need a spare.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
12,467 Posts
Lugers! Very fine weapons. But let me share and experience I had with my Father in Law's Artillery Lugar. Now I will tell on myself, so it doesn't happen to someone else in the future. All of my years with weapons here was the only un-intentional discharge I ever had so far in life. Knock on wood!;)
I have always handled weapons with extreme caution. But what happened I took the Magazine out of the Pistol and Pulled the Toggle Up to look into the Chamber to be sure it was empty. Unfortunately, I was looking directly over the top of the Toggle as it was in the completely UP position, as I looked into the Chamber to assure it was clear. At the angle I was holding the pistol from straight behind it and over the top of the Toggle and at a downward angle. Little did I know a round had been held on the Face of the Bolt. And as I point the Pistol in a safe direction and pulled the
Trigger and "BOOOM!😣 So moral of the story, when clearing the Luger be sure you are looking down at a direct angle at the the top of the Bolt and Bolt Face area!;)

03
 
  • Like
Reactions: OLD Ron and Dubar

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,333 Posts
This is the handgun that started it all.
All striker fired modern "wonder nines" can trace their ancestry to this.
A 1942 production is good too IMO.
Its wartime which is cool but not so late in the war that they were making them in dark cellars while being bombed overhead (with predictable results for quality).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
What I love about old guns is the stories they tell if you know where to look.

20210608_030512.jpg


Mine's an old war horse with a long story.

The 514th one made in 1914 she saw service in the German military in WWI and survived the war. Her owner had notched her left grip panel for each year of the the war 1914-1918. She was not returned as required by the armistice. If she were she would have had a second date stamped onto the frame. Sometime after she entered police service where a pinhole was drilled into the trigger bar assembly for the sear safety.

She managed to make it the the US sometime before the creation of the Relics and Curiosity exemption list for the 1968 NFA and so in compliance with the NFA's ban of SBRs had her stock lug ground off. This is why her backstrap is lopsided toward the bottom.

None of her original bluing remains, only a uneven browning is left and her safety is loose. I have yet to shoot her, I wanted to get some low power target ammo just in case. Still, she is a beauty to me.

I forgot to mention: before firing your luger, you'll need to check a few things. First strip it down to the receiver and barrel. While holding the barrel in your hand give the receiver a flick with your figure like a tuning fork. If you feel vibrations that means your frame is good. If it is a dull thud and you get no vibrations, then get your receiver checked because that is an indicator that you have a cracked receiver.

Second: check for cracks on the breech assembly, particularly on the toggle and forward toggle link around the axle hoops.

Enjoy your new family member.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
before firing your luger, you'll need to check a few things. First strip it down to the receiver and barrel. While holding the barrel in your hand give the receiver a flick with your figure like a tuning fork. If you feel vibrations that means your frame is good. If it is a dull thud and you get no vibrations, then get your receiver checked because that is an indicator that you have a cracked receiver.

Second: check for cracks on the breech assembly, particularly on the toggle and forward toggle link around the axle hoops.
Thanks! I read about the tuning fork thing. Seller said it's a shooter, so hopefully no problems, but if the receiver is or does ever crack, what can be done about it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The long barreled Lugers look cool!!!

That cross-shaped tool that comes with them, is that a necessary thing to have or can any tool that'll work be used? I doubt one comes with my gun, but I have seen them for sale.
 

·
Supporting Member
Joined
·
12,467 Posts
Old Ron
Is your top photo an Artillery Luger. It looks an awful like my former Father in Law's Pistol? Now my former Brother in Law has it.

03
 
  • Like
Reactions: OLD Ron

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I have 2 Luger pistols - my 1st was a DWM P06, 1912 build, in 7.65mm (.30cal) - it was purchased to be my 1 and only, never to be shot, collectable - it's about as pristine (original, all matching) as one can find in a Luger.....but I wanted to be able to shoot a Luger so I bought a Mauser P08, 1938 build (my birth year) - it too is in excellent condition and all matching - yes I shoot it but not all that often (would break my heart if I "broke it" - oh, and I use the consensus WWB 115gr ammo when it does follow me to the range)

both of mine :




an individual of the P06 and it's time period holster :




a closeup of my P08

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
oh, and I use the consensus WWB 115gr ammo when it does follow me to the range
I was wondering what I should shoot in mine. I think I currently have a lot of Fiocchi 9mm as well as some WWB.

I used to work with 2-3 guys that inspected firearms on the Navy ships before I retired (14 years ago now!), wish I could find one of them to take a look at my Luger. There's a good gunsmith at the indoor range I go to so I'll probably let him take a look.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I had the same thought when I 1st became interested in Lugers, but there's not a lot of Luger-wise gunsmiths to be found, so lots of luck with that.....

you might wanna check out this site - probably the biggest Luger forum to be viewed - lots of info to be had : Pistole Parabellum
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Thanks! I read about the tuning fork thing. Seller said it's a shooter, so hopefully no problems, but if the receiver is or does ever crack, what can be done about it?
There isn't much that can reasonably be done at that point. You can get it micro welded and then rehardened, but the cost is usually not worth it if you can even find someone that will take the job. In most cases like that, I recommend getting a shooter receiver, one that doesn't necessarily match but is just for shooting, and just throw that on when you want to pop off a few rounds, and keep the original for display.

For the most part, the receiver rarely cracks and if you get it from a reputable dealer or gunsmith, chances are there won't be an issue.

The long barreled Lugers look cool!!!

That cross-shaped tool that comes with them, is that a necessary thing to have or can any tool that'll work be used? I doubt one comes with my gun, but I have seen them for sale.
They're not necessary, but they make loading the magazines a lot easier. Those mag followers tabs can have sharp corners.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top