Any ideas why the 1st shot is innaccurate?

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by rbwell, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. rbwell

    rbwell New Member

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    I have a Belgium-made Browning .22 auto, and the first shot shoots 4-6 inches low and to the right. The remainder of the shots are bulls-eye. This has happened multiple times. Is there any chance this could be caused by movement of the scope rings?
     
  2. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    For a hundred years in matches shooters have done a 'fouling shot' before the actual scoring shots.
     

  3. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Why don't you just skip firing the first shot?
     
  4. MCarter788

    MCarter788 New Member

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    If you have cleaning solution in your barrel then it will change the way the projectile travels down the barrel.
     
  5. Jagermeister

    Jagermeister New Member

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    Also, if you have oil in the barrel, the first bullet will travel further in the direction of the rifling. We call it the oil shot over here. Not sure what is called in the States.
     
  6. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Save a lot on ammo that way, huh, V?

    With all three of my Mosins, the opposite is true.

    The first shot is dead-bang center, and all the follow-up shots are crap...
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
  7. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Not really, but one less 'flyer' does tighten up my groups.
     
  8. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    from your description, i am thinking these guys have hit the mark. oil residue in the barrel can cause an errant shot on the first one. either take a fouling shot or run a dry patch through the barrel before you start shooting.

    i highly doubt it's the scope rings. if it was, all of your shots would be all over the place.
     
  9. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    That is a lon g way from a flier . Is your barrel clean and dry or dry from the last time to the range. If dry. Reduce cleaning as 22's don't need to be cleaned like some other fireams do. Clean the chamber ,the bolt face , the rest of the receiver and action but at best just wipe the barrel with a dry cloth . Even then the different lube used on 22 do react differently when cold and it tends to take a couple rounds to warm things upp. Change ammo brands and a new lube in introduced to the barrel and those first 10 to 20 shoots may shoot differently than the rest of a box too.

    rimefires can be the most convoluted cartridges out there.
     
  10. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I use a small diameter laundry line cord, soaked in oil,

    to clean my 22LRs, feed a string from the chamber side,

    and pull the rope through the barrel once, it picks up gunpowder

    and leaves oil.

    Noo need to show your gratitude, for my pioneering another

    way to save heaps of money on barrel cleaning, the satisfaction

    of helping is thanks enough.

    I'll be here till Thursday...:D
     
  11. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    Is it the first shot in a string or is it the first shot after you clean it?
     
  12. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I just use a dry brush on my 22LR, unless the gun will be stored for a long time. If I know I am going to store the weapon I oil the barrel with a patch. I save my 22 cal mops for pushing out dry powder after brushing.
     
  13. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The first round isn't seating the same as those seated when the action cycles automatically.
     
  14. LeMat

    LeMat New Member

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    I haven't cleaned the barrels on my 22's since the mid-80's.
     
  15. bamashooter68

    bamashooter68 Member

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    This is pretty much my method in between deep cleanings. A brush and a mop and very little if any oil. Keeps em shootin straight for me. :)
     
  16. Mercator

    Mercator Active Member

    While the oiled bore makes sense, funny thing is that nobody knows for sure. I have not noticed such a problem with my 22s at all. I see it occasionally with the Glocks, first shot from a full magazine. The tough mag spring and the unsupported chamber seating may have something g to do here, but the truth is, I don't know.
     
  17. mboylan

    mboylan New Member

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    The best .22 target rifle manufacturers recommend cleaning the bore only after several thousand rounds. That is your problem. Don't clean your bore. Let it stay seasoned with bullet lube.
     
  18. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Most people primarily shoot bulk ammo. There is very little lubricant on bulk ammo compared to premium rimfire ammo. Not to mention if you store bulk ammo for over a year or so the lubricant dries up. YMMV counting on bullet lube from 22LR.
     
  19. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I note this same thing with my Ruger MkII and my Ruger 10/22. First round out of the mag is usually off a bit from the rest of the group. It may have to do with the differences in the way rounds seat in the chamber when manually cycled vs. cycled from firing. As someone else already mentioned, fouling shots are often used when firing for groups. I did this when testing different ammo for the best groups with these auto loaders. I would fire one round at a central point of the target and then fire for record the rest of the shots at the actual intended bullseye.

    My bolt action .22 has no such problem evident.
     
  20. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Target shooters when testing 22lr ammo will clean the bore when changing brands and then fire 10 or more shots with the new ammo to coat the bore with the different brands lube. I have seen some shooters weigh each round and segregate them by weight, mic the rim thickness and so on. When they find a good shooter, they try and buy up the whole lot. Way out of my league.