Another 'Which Revolver' Thread

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by themyst, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. themyst

    themyst New Member

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    I currently carry a Ruger SR9 and am so very pleased with it. I've been reading a lot about how it is best to carry it cocked & locked and that sounds good to me in case of an emergency as it would be ready to go with a flip of the safety. But as I've been reading others' opinions about it, I'm now on the fence as A - the gun is of course more volatile in it's cocked position, and B - I thought it was bad for the tension spring to have constant pressure on it. Not trying to start a debate on that ...

    So I'm thinking of maybe carrying a revolver for my primary gun, that way I wouldn't have to carry it cocked and in case of emergency, I could draw and use it with one hand.

    I can't handle a big kick, my husband's Beretta is much too powerful for me, but I don't want something too puny, either. My 9mm is just right. What pistol might compare to the minimal kick of a 9mm? I realize the kind of ammo I use will also be a factor.
     
  2. MotorG20

    MotorG20 New Member

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    What about Ruger LCR revolver in 38spl ? Half polymer, half alloy, and uglier than sin, but I hear they're very light and reliable. Another bonus is that they're +P rated.
    Go to Ruger.com and check it out.

    MotorG20:)
     

  3. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    You'll be hard pressed to find a better carry revolver then the LCR....unless you want something that hits harder then a 38.
     
  4. jbd

    jbd New Member

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    i have the LCR and think you would be hard pressed to find a better ccw. im not sure the guys/gals here would probably be better suited to answer this one but the +p vs 9mm are prob pretty close in ballistic numbers. i know i feel safe carrying the ruger LCR. i also enjoy shooting the little gun too.
     
  5. themyst

    themyst New Member

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    The LCR does look like a convenient carry. I wonder how it compares to the new S&W Bodyguard 38? That's listed as 14.3 oz. and it's a good-looking pistol.

    Well thanks, at least I've narrowed it down. One of these will probably be my new gun soon. :)
     
  6. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    Themyst, if recoil is a problem, you might want to sacrifice a bit of carry comfort and go with an all steel snubbie. They are still easy to carry all day long, and they'll reduce the felt recoil.

    I'd go for either a Ruger SP-101 or a Smith & Wesson J frame (I prefer models with no exposed hammers, like the 640). Shooting .38 +p out of those is going to be much more comfortable than from the LCR.

    And they are much better looking than that tupperware abomination! :)
     
  7. themyst

    themyst New Member

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    I had access to a Ruger SP101 before, and although it was just about as heavy as my 9mm, it felt much heavier. Somehow the weight felt disproportionate - as if the grip was too light and it was a bit awkward to hold because all the weight was at the front. You are right though, it is a good-looking pistol. But, also, I was worried that a .357 would have more of a kick than my 9mm.
     
  8. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    Even if you opt for the .357 SP101, there's no reason you can't still fire .38+P in it. In fact I'd recommend you practice with .38s. The LCR is a very good defense revolver,as is the J frame S&Ws. Go to a gun store and handle them and compare them side by side. See which 1 feels best in YOUR hands. See which has the most natural "pointability". If possible shoot them before buying if your gunstore/range rents guns.
     
  9. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

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    The SP101 is my primary CCW.

    It has many benefits in my eyes.

    I can drop it on the ground and the only thing hurt is the ground. I can shoot .38 specials endlessly for pennies and great practice. It is very concealable in all months. Mag loads (.357) don't feel too rough due to it's weight. You also have a variety of SD loads to choose from ranging form .38 - .38+p - .38+p+ - .357. Not only is it good for urban carry/use, it is a durable mountain/camping gun (for me).

    The negative. The trigger pull is longer than most DAs and also pretty heavy. Dry firing/practice has loosened mine, but I'm sure it can be done professionally as well.

    But I'm sure any of the above firearms would suit you and you needs well. :)
     
  10. RugerShootinGal

    RugerShootinGal New Member

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    I am a huge fan of the LCR. I have only had it a little while I have shot 38 specials and the +ps I think it is a great CCW choice :)
     
  11. themyst

    themyst New Member

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    Thanks for all the replies. RugerShootinGal, I'm partial to Ruger myself as it is the only brand I have personally owned and know they make a good product.

    I will be taking all these suggestions into consideration. I'm still leaning towards that S&W Bodyguard 38 though - but now Franciscomv has me considering my purist inhibitions. Perhaps I should give the SP101 another look.
     
  12. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    [​IMG]

    ...........................< 1 pound loaded!

    Nuff said. [​IMG]
     
  13. MotorG20

    MotorG20 New Member

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    Oh man, that really hurts the eyes. I know they are well built and reliable, but man are they ugly:D. But then again, I think Glocks are beautiful, so don't listen to me:)

    MotorG20
     
  14. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    Absolute proof positive that beauty is in the eye of the beholder...
     
  15. Wambli

    Wambli New Member

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    Please don't take this the wrong way but if your husband's Beretta is too much for you recoil wise you are going to find the recoil of an ultra light weight snubbie loaded with any reasonable self defense load VERY objectionable.

    The Ruger was meant to be carried in the manner you describe and there is no issue with spring breaking down. They are designed to stay under tension for a looooooong time. If you are not comfortable with the guns operation that is another matter entirely.

    You have two options. Either get the lightweight revolver you want and get some training to learn how to manage recoil or get another pistol in 9mm that feels like your Ruger but operates in a manner that you find more acceptable for carry.

    I would trade the Ruger for a Kahr. No external safety and a longer DA pull might make you more confident in the gun. The slimmer grip tends to be more female friendly too. In fact both my wife and daughter love Kahr pistols for concealed carry. Another good choice would be the Walther PPS in 9mm and if you want high capacity the XD compact in 9mm is a great choice.

    I would still get some training to learn how to manage recoil better. Good luck in your search.
     
  16. themyst

    themyst New Member

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    Okay, so would that mean that I might be better off with the SP101 then?
     
  17. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    Absolutely. Light = recoil, always has always will...
     
  18. themyst

    themyst New Member

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    I had no idea. I'm so glad I came here with my questions before I went out and bought something. Not that my husband wouldn't mind taking over a newly purchased pistol that I couldn't handle ... :rolleyes:

    Well, this puts me on the right track then. Thanks!
     
  19. stalkingbear

    stalkingbear Active Member

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    What caliber is your husband's Beretta? That answer will tell us your comfort level for recoil. It sounds like it might be .40 S&W. If it is, they are known for their snappy recoil. Be aware that compact guns are a compromise. The smaller & lighter they are, the harder to shoot comfortably they'll be. The Ruger LCR is comfortable to shoot as long as you don't shoot +P loads in it. The SP101 will be comfortable to shoot with any .38 loads.
     
  20. themyst

    themyst New Member

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    Sorry, I thought I had that in a previous post, must have erased it in error.

    It's a 45, but the recoil freaked me out so bad that I'll never pick it up again. It wouldn't matter if it was a 40 for that matter, I just can't handle any kind of recoil at all. My husband is great with guns and instructing me, but he hasn't been so successful with getting me to handle this. I don't know how to get past it. So in the meantime, I just keep seeking pistols with very little recoil.