another s&w m19 question

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by lilrichthedragon, Sep 4, 2012.

  1. lilrichthedragon

    lilrichthedragon New Member

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    I have a model 19-6 and had heard some rumors about using less than 158 gr. 357 rounds and using alot of 158 gr bullets could cause a crack a 6 o'clock of the forcing cone. I have shot about 30 rounds of 158 gr 357 bullets and 70 .38 special through mine. Checked it as soon as I saw the article on the internet. It looks good but I wanted to know if any of you fine folks on this forum had heard of this or experienced it 1st hand.
     
  2. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Only model I heard of it happening to is the 65 variants. On those, the bottom of the cone was cut out to make a flat area to clear cylinder pin.

    If the bottom of your forcing cone (or 6 o'clock position) is flat, then just take care in using the right ammo, as explained to me, the heavier, slightly lower velocity ammo.
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Just shoot 158gr. 357's and .38's and you'll be fine. Model 19's don't like a steady diet of .357's. My suggestion is to practice mostly with .38's and just a few cylinders of .357's. Do not shoot +P's or +P+'s. Stay away from hot loads altogether. Do this and you'll be able to pass it down in the family.

    BTW, the Model 19 and the 629 are my favorite S&W's.
     
  4. lilrichthedragon

    lilrichthedragon New Member

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    Thanks. Are there any grains I need to stay away from outta 38 special
     
  5. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    Stay away from 125 grain bullets with hot charges. You'll be just fine. I shoot a lot of .38s out of my 66s. I think my best target load is 3.0 of Bullseye behind a 158gr Lead SWC.
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Just stay with 158gr. in everything and you're good to go. My favorite practice round is 158gr. lead semi wadcutters. Just don't use +P's.
     
  7. mag318

    mag318 Member

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    This is why S&W developed the L frame revolvers, to address the K frames cracking forcing cone. Some departments required their officers to qualify with full power duty loads, hence these cracks started showing up. At the time many departments issues 125 grn. 357 Magnum duty loads. My department (Chicago) issues 158 grn +P LHP ammo and even after many thousand rounds my Model 66s forcing cone was fine. So as recommended above if you stick with heavier ammo you should be fine. If you look at an L frames forcing cone it is round with no flat milled into the bottom 6 o'clock portion. The Model 66s and other K frame 357s were designed to handle sparingly light use of 357 ammo, and most owners shoot mostly 38 Special ammo through theirs with an occassional 357. The L framed Smiths such as the 581,681,586 and the 686 can take a steady diet of the hottest 357 loads with no ill effects. Enjoy your Model 66 and just be aware of this.
     
  8. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Now, is this all k frames? The only one I'd heard of was the model 65. Now, that may be only because that's the model I had, so it's the only one I researched.
     
  9. mag318

    mag318 Member

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    This is for all K frames, the 6 o'clock portion of the forcing cones are milled flat to allow for the cylinder crane clearance. Here are some photos of several different K frames to illustrate what I'm talking about.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Cheeseman

    Cheeseman New Member

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    I have often heard K Frame Smiths are great carry guns but are prone to this problem, "shooting loose" as well with a steady diet of hot loads.
     
  11. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    They can shoot loose, but luckily, most things on a Smith and Wesson can be fixed, repaired, or modified rather quickly and easily. Fixing a loose revolver cylinder (on a Smith) takes maybe 5 minutes, I've done it.

    A cracked forcing cone, however, can't really be fixed. Must be replaced, special tools used... And really, it's easier and damn near worth it to just buy a new gun, as per the stories I've heard.
     
  12. lilrichthedragon

    lilrichthedragon New Member

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    Yeah I've seen some pics on the internet
     
  13. lilrichthedragon

    lilrichthedragon New Member

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    Found a woman that is willing to sell me a 4in barrel so now ill have a replacement if something were to happen
     
  14. lilrichthedragon

    lilrichthedragon New Member

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    Don't you just have to tighten the screw on the side of the frame
     
  15. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    It might need to be shimmed.
     
  16. lilrichthedragon

    lilrichthedragon New Member

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    The screw or the chamber
     
  17. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Bingo.
    Midway and brownell's sell shims, and Mr. Larry Potterfield has video tutorials on YouTube.
     
  18. lilrichthedragon

    lilrichthedragon New Member

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    I know if you get the screw too tight the crane is hard to swing open
     
  19. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    The cylinder can work loose and need to be shimmed on the ejector rod. Loose screws are no big deal.