Annealing brass

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by bradam, Feb 18, 2014.

  1. bradam

    bradam Member

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    How many (approximate) firings per shell before annealing? I have read about several different ways to do this and some say they are right and some say they are wrong. I would rather toss the brass than do it wrong. So what is the right way.:)
     
  2. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    I saw this process on YouTube.
    I plan to revisit it but do not have the link. It is easily searched. How and when is explained along with some tips using a drill spinning the brass in front of a torch.
     

  3. bradam

    bradam Member

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    Thank you for your reply.
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I anneal all rifle calibers larger than .223 EVERY time. This is overkill, but I end up with range brass of unknown origin and annealing is a quick and easy way to make the brass serviceable. Realistically, every 3 or 4 firings would be fine.

    I anneal in a pie pan of water. Heat the necks till they glow cherry red and tip them over in the water.
     
  5. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    When the brass starts to "cherp" when backing over the expanding button. Use a baking pan stand the brass up. Fill the pan with water until it is more than 50 % submersed. Use a gas torch and heat only the neck and shoulder until red hot. Tip the case over into the water immediately. That is all there is to it. :)
     
  6. bradam

    bradam Member

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    A bread pan or a pie pan, I don't get in the kitchen much but I do like the recipe.
     
  7. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    A shallow wide baking pan. You need enough room to move the torch freely over the water and around the brass. Brass becomes partially work hardened from the FL die and expander ball. Using a good lube in the ID of the necks can slow the stretching and hardening. When loading virgin brass always anneal before charging. :)
     
  8. bradam

    bradam Member

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    good info thanks
     
  9. deg

    deg Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Ok, I have a dumb question….why anneal – is it to keep the brass from splitting during reloading?
     
  10. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    it does but it also allows the bullet to release evenly from the case when fired meaning it will hit the lands and grooves straight instead of a slight angle. gives much better accuracy
     
  11. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    If I don't anneal, I end up throwing away a lot of my reloads on LC brass (military Lake City).
    Reloads look fine, but the fired reload has a split neck. Unknown brass is usually the culprit

    I still want to come up with an easier, faster, better way of annealing. :(

    I may spend months trying to think of a way to save a few minutes.
    .
     
  12. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    Just get one of these. Sure it's $495 but it is the best way to do it. If you want you can have them drop into a bucket of water or just drop them into a 9x13 or some form of metal can like a coffee can.

    http://www.annealingmachines.com/model-400.html
     
  13. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

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    Folks. There are a $hitload of videos on youtube.
    Just search: annealing brass cases.
    Along with the informative posts so far, you'll be all set.
     
  14. deg

    deg Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    This looks like a pretty nice piece of equipment – I cannot tell in the video, but is it also spinning the case? Otherwise I would think it would heat one side more than the other.
     
  15. Hairtrigger

    Hairtrigger Member

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    I only anneal oddbrass. Try finding 22-454 brass.....it needs to last as long as I can make it
    I purchased a Ken Light machine, it sure helps in consistency. For me money well spent
     
  16. bradam

    bradam Member

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    Thanks for the link. there is a another model for a 100.00 less and a very descriptive article on annealing at 6mmBr,com. Thank you to everyone whom have contributed to another learning experience.
     
  17. bradam

    bradam Member

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    How many firings do you get on the LC brass before they split or you discard. Are they once fired when you buy or new? check out the 6mmBr.com site. It gives you other manual techniques( if cost of auto annealing machine is cost prohibitive) along with other dos and don'ts. good luck and let me know if something you try works.
     
  18. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Unless you don't heat up the necks of the case enough,or anneal too far past the neck-below the shoulder,there is hardly any chance of doing it wrong.
    If you heat the case below the shoulder,you can have it separate when fired,and then you really have a problem with part of a case stuck in your chamber.

    I anneal my cases after every other firing. I use a shell holder or deep socket on a cordless drill,and a 1 lb propane torch set-up on my workbench. Rotate the case in the flame until it turns red,and drop the case into a metal ammo can to cool off. I anneal the cases before I resize or trim them.
    Dunking them in water does nothing for the brass other than helps cool it off,and it just adds another step to your reloading chores-drying the brass off!

    Why? Virgin brass (Bottle necked brass) was annealed at the factory after it was formed. Doing that to virgin brass is a big waste of time,IMO.

    One day,I will buy this Annealing machine. IMO,It's the best one made,and you don't have to set there and continually load brass into it by hand.
    Just load all of your brass of the caliber you need to anneal into the rack,fire up the torch,and turn it on.

    http://www.giraudtool.com/annealer1.htm
     
  19. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    Much of the LC brass was found in the field. It looked good after a walnut shell vibrator cycle.

    I went ahead and loaded it as found after the cleaning. Unknown history on most if not all of them. Some of them may have been twice loaded by me.

    The summer before last, I took my ammo box of almost 2000 reloads on camping trips and introduced people to shooting. I went through a lot.
    I might be running 5% or more on split necks.

    I'll have to anneal them before I reload them again. I usually use 55gr and a starting load (or near it) for my reloads, so I am not too worried about a neck failure. Shouldn't be too hard on the chamber of the AR15.

    I did like the pics of the annealer linked above. I doubt I would spring that kinda' money tho' My bread pan and water method has worked, but I still have problems keeping the cases from falling over too early too easily.

    I need to do something soon. I have about 2000 cases cleaned and deprimed. .

    I'm not sure I found the link. ? I am interested in looking it up.
     
  20. bradam

    bradam Member

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    I do not know how to paste cut or provide automatic links. but if you type 6mmBr.com top technical features that should get you headed in the right direction, once on site scroll down til you see the annealing article good luck thanks for your report on your brass.