and another tiresome set of reloading questions

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by fmj, Apr 30, 2012.

  1. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    OK, after reloading more than a thousand .357, right at about 1000 .44 mags, and about 500 45acp i have decided i am ready to tackle my first round of large rifle reloads.

    So far i have tumbled/polished 100 30-06 springfield brass, lubricated the inside of the necks with cotton swab and sprayed the outside and shook in a plastic bag for a couple minutes until well coated. Then ran thru the full length sizing die. (i THINK its the full length die....at least it looks like the one in the picture in the included instructions from Lee) Now i am in the process of trimming and cleaning primer pockets.

    I now see why you guys say you use your single stage press for rifle cartridges. A different process for sure than pistol loads.

    ANYWHO, my questions. Am I on the right track? What do i do with the brass shavings that fall inside the case? Not worry?

    Next i guess i will prime, or do I then run thru the "Collet sizer" die then prime? Then charge, then seat the 180 gr SPBTs.

    Still on the right track??

    I worry and have waited this long because the rounds will be shot out of my dead dads Remington Model Four. (Irreplaceable gun!) My next round of reloads will be .35 Rem....to be shot out of my Grandfathers extremely low digit serial number (in pristine shape i might add) Remington Model 141. (Another Irreplaceable gun)

    I i am being uber anal about these loads for the above reasons. If i blew up my 686, 1911, or .44 carbine.... The 1911 was the first pistol i bought for myself after moving out, the 686 was my 30th B-day gift from the wife, the Carbine is old and cool. It would surely bother to damage any of these guns, but they ARE replaceable. Yanno? But I havent, (to this point) so its all good...but these rifles are a completely different game!

    Please forgive my tiresome ignorance but they say and i fully believe the only stupid questions are those unasked!

    Any and all advice is welcome and appreciated. Reading the directions in the manual, the leaflet that came with the dies is good....but why not use all the resources available to me? Like YOU GUYS!!;):D
     
  2. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    Another question....will i want to wipe excess lube from the interior of the cases/case necks before charging?? or will that not matter much?
     

  3. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    Lee clains that their case lube will not effect powder or primers. Not sure about other brands. I use cabelas spray case lube. No problems of any kind so far.
     
  4. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    Not sure the brand i'm using (its in the basement in the loading room...i'm trimming and cleaning primer pockets at the desk) but its ingredients are lanolin and alcohol...the alcohol evaporates in short order, not sure if lanolin has adverse affects on powder.
     
  5. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

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    This may sound funny but I've never lubed the inside of a case. Just never had to do it. I load .223. .308, 30-30, 30-06
     
  6. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    FMJ, it sounds like you're on the right track and doing just fine. i clean my primer pockets after trimming if needed, that way the shavings fall out of the case. doubt there would be any problems if they didn't, but oh well.

    biggest area of concern is the powder charge. an overcharge could potentially damage a gun. an undercharge could cause a squib, which if it sticks in the barrel could be damaging to the gun and you. just check and double check your powder charges.

    i use the Hornady case lube and really like it. works great for my style of reloading.

    i usually wipe off the excess before charging with powder, as the next step is seating the bullet and no lube is usually needed to seat the bullet.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2012
  7. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i don't either. i think this is more needed when resizing from one caliber to another. example renecking a 30-06 to a 25-06. or creating a wildcat.
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Lubing the inside is needed if your not using a carbide expander ball and then the difference is mainly more effort needed to raise the press arm. The issue that can happen with not lubing is you can break the expander off in the case neck or rip the rim off leaving the case stuck in the die.

    I dont lube the inside and have never had either of these issues.

    Just turn the case upside down give it a tap and the shavings come out.

    Start right in the middle or slightly less than middle range charges using a light bullet for irreplaceable firearms. Might not be the best accuracy but it wont tear them up.

    I do a lot of my case prep on my progressive since they have to be run through in steps before final loading. Bottle necks are time consuming doing the prep work.

    Since bottlenecks are getting worked more and the pressure is higher you will find another fun case prep thing called annealing. Bottlenecks after a few firings become work hardened and need to be annealed to soften the necks again. This gives more uses before they split or become unusuable

    Just make sure your trimming after sizing not before.
     
  9. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    You do not need to run your Full Length sized brass through the Collet die. The Collet die is for neck sizing only which is an Either-Or. You can Full Length size or you can Neck size, no need to do both.

    I think your next step should be to check those sized cases and see if they chamber with ease. It's not uncommon for a new handloader to take his/her first batch of handloads to the range only to find out that they will not chamber due to improper FL sizing. Check your brass now before you load any primers/powder for proper fit. Now is the time to make any adjustments in the sizing die if needed.

    Id this New brass or fired brass?
     
  10. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    I have always bought carbide dies because of the no need to lube thing. But i read somewhere lubing was needed on rifle cartridges. Will skip the lubing step on the next 50 and see how it goes.

    I ran thru full length sizing die, then trimmed. After trimming/chamfering i turned upside down and gave a couple taps, then cleaned primer pockets. But some small shavings are still inside.

    Guess i will run thru the Collet sizing die later, prime, charge and seat the bullets.

    So far, with my pistol rounds, i have had best luck and accuracy from using a couple more grains than suggested starting charge, but more than a couple shy of max charge.

    Far as powder charges go, i weigh every charge....if its within a 1/10th of a grain, above or below, it gets thrown. Anything else gets trickled.
     
  11. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    NO Please do not skip the lube! You will get the case stuck in the die. Lubing bottle necked rifle brass is a MUST when FL sizing. It is not required if you use the Collet die, but it is required for the FL die.
     
  12. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    All once fired.

    OK, will drop them in and make sure they chamber.
     
  13. steve4102

    steve4102 New Member

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    I just re-read all the previous posts. Were you were referring to skipping the case lube inside the neck or skipping the entire lubing process?
     
  14. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    I was thinking the lube process entirely...but after thinking on it a bit, i think i will continue with my process. I figure wiping the inside of the neck with a lubed swab will help clean out any grit, grime or left over media from tumbling.
     
  15. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    I just grabbed a random selection of 5 cases from the 50 i have ready to go. All chambered/ejected fine in the gun.
     
  16. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    FMJ, remember carbide dies are made to use without lube, but most bottlenecked dies are made to be used with lube unless they are made for using without lube. if you skip lubing the outside on a die that requires lube, you run the risk of a stuck case. also some pistol dies if not made of carbide can require you to lube the case. they are usually cheaper to make and sell than carbide dies.
     
  17. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Outside case lube is a must on all bottleneck cartridges regardless of die construction. Carbide rifle dies will stick unlubed cases evertime.

    The inside neck lube is what is optional.
     
  18. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I lube the inside of about every 5th case on rifles. The lube can ease the expanding process and reduce case stretching. After resizing, run them through the tumbler for a bit to remove the lube.
     
  19. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    i lube the out side of every case. and the inside every 3rd case. wipe down all the shells after sizing. then trim, clean pocket primer. at this point i then load a primer, powder and seat bullet. once you get past the trimming part the rest is cake... also if you want to make sure you have the proper seating length take a completely empty, trimmed case, and seat a bullet or two. no primers or powders at this point. just shell and bullet. good for making sure your finished product will fit good without wasting primers,powder
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2012
  20. fmj

    fmj Active Member

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    OK, next question!

    I have seated a couple "Dummy" bullets. 1 to 3.280" per manual spec. 1 to 3.275". Both chambered fine. Upon ejection i looked at the bullets and there is a scratch on the bullet that looks like it was seated on the lands of the barrel.

    Also, there is a groove cut in the bullet (the name of this eludes me at the moment...canalure??) for a crimp. The case neck is a couple thousandths below this groove. The entire groove (canalure?) is exposed.

    Would it be ok to seat slightly deeper? also, should i crimp or not? (dont have the crimp die)