Ammo storage temperature issue

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Scratchammo, Jul 4, 2013.

  1. Scratchammo

    Scratchammo New Member

    1,490
    0
    0
    I live in an add-on & the ac/heater is off when I'm out. I have ammo cans filled & with desiccant. I keep them in my gun safe. Basically my room is like an attic when I'm gone. How bad is this? I plan on never using this ammo if I have to & I don't want to constantly rotate stock. I live in North Mississippi.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2013
  2. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

    2,523
    0
    0
    Temperature and humidity are both problems. Dessicant and ammo cans are dealing with the moisture. But high temps could be a problem.

    You should get one of those digital thermometers that keeps track of high temperature. At least this way you'd be able to see what the high temp actually is in your safe each day. That would be a good start.
     

  3. Scratchammo

    Scratchammo New Member

    1,490
    0
    0
    Yeah, just got back from Walmart with a cheaper dial thermometer. I'll see how hot it gets.
     
  4. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

    2,523
    0
    0
    Does it keep track of the high? I suppose you could just check it when you get home and turn on the AC. That would probably be the high, right?

    Oh, another idea. How about opening the safe when you're at home so the AC can cool it (with dryer air, too). And then close it once it is cooler.
     
  5. Scratchammo

    Scratchammo New Member

    1,490
    0
    0
    It doesn't but should give me a general idea. I plan on looking when I get home each day. I'll put it in the .38/357 can since it's not completely full.
     
  6. Scratchammo

    Scratchammo New Member

    1,490
    0
    0
    It's not that hot in here right now. At the moment it's about 87° inside the can.
     
  7. bfoosh006

    bfoosh006 New Member

    45
    0
    0
    While not as secure as your safe, if you bought a large camping cooler, and moved the ammo into it , it will certainly help stabilize the temp. fluctuations.
     
  8. Scratchammo

    Scratchammo New Member

    1,490
    0
    0
    Never thought of that.
     
  9. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

    4,435
    28
    38
    I've got ammo that is several decades old stored in ammo cans. It has spent most of the time in an un-insulated workshop for 20-25 years,and before that was just kept on a shelf in a closet.
    As long as you keep it in a closed ammo can with a good gasket on the lid,you have very little to worry about. I've got a bunch of old Peter's shotgun shells and other cartridges from the 60's,and they shoot just as good as they did back then.
    Moisture is your enemy,if the cans seal good,you have little to worry about.
     
  10. pawjr74

    pawjr74 New Member

    2,355
    0
    0
    I'm sure the folks over there in Afghanistan don't keep their ammo in air conditioned buildings. I've kept ammo in my garage here in Arizona for years and it has functioned fine. It does stay nice and dry here though. Moisture is the enemy.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2013
  11. bluez

    bluez Well-Known Member

    1,638
    57
    48
    Great first post !:D
     
  12. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

    6,924
    51
    48
    Ammo can handle some heat. Temps in vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan will be over 130 at times. Moisture is the big one.
     
  13. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

    5,360
    3
    38
    I have ammo in cans in a walk in closet, loose rounds in the same closet. Temp can go from 55-100 degrees. No issue. I also keep cases in my basement. The Humidity level is higher but still no issue. If you go from freezing to 100+ a few times a year, you may have an issue. I have .22lr ammo and shotgun shells that I bought as a kid and it was stored in a draw that could go from -20 to 110 degrees, no issue. Long term exposer is the issue. I shoot lots of ammo from the 1940's. Always goes bang.
     
  14. pawjr74

    pawjr74 New Member

    2,355
    0
    0
    We have firework tents set up out here in Arizona and it can easily get up to 115. I would think fireworks would be more sensitive to heat than ammo.
     
  15. trip

    trip New Member

    64
    0
    0
    I wouldn't worry about it. I have old ammo that sits in a shed for years 115 in the summer and freezes in the winter. Still shoots. Never had an issue. But I do believe that moisture would be a problem.
     
  16. chuckusaret

    chuckusaret Member

    509
    0
    16
    I have ammo that was stored in my fathers garage on open shelves for over 30 years and I have stored most of it in ammo cans since '92 and never a problem with any of it so far. I use the longest stored for training/practice with the exception of the collectible stuff such as Peters, Leaders, J.C. Higgins, Wards and the very old UMC ammo.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2013
  17. Scratchammo

    Scratchammo New Member

    1,490
    0
    0
    Thanks for the posts, y'all. Good info as always.
     
  18. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

    2,523
    0
    0
    Yeah, awesome thread! I've realized that my little fluctuations of 90 at the high in my garage to a low of 40 are basically nothing to worry about.

    I guess that is one more thing I don't need to overthink.
     
  19. grandpubba

    grandpubba Member

    116
    0
    16
    So the GF is starting to complain about the ammo in the closets, I know to keep it as dry as possible, stores in ammo cans or factory boxes.

    I don't have room in the safe for me ammo, and who wants to waste space in the second safe for ammo when guns need homes!

    I guess my question is where do you store your extra bulk ammo (if you have any)
    I was thinking of getting a shelf unit, like at home dept, those heavy duty ones, anyone use those or just store it on the floor and stack it?
     
  20. Shade

    Shade New Member

    1,720
    0
    0
    All most all my ammo is stored in my shop in .30 and .50 cal. ammo cans
    I purchased a wire shelving unit that works great with the cans. The only
    ammo in the house is in mags or speed loaders for the hand guns.