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Yep
I put the single stage in single stage.

I have couple thousand rounds cleaned and easy to process.
Another 4+ thousand are sized and primed
And then 10k rounds loaded.

Make a trip to the range and pick up everything I can reach.
Me too. Although I hate having to do extra checks on brass left on the ground by others. I only leave brass on the ground when I feel it has reached the end of its reloadability . . . . BUT, I get a lot of my brass just that way.
 

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Actually I drag it outside under the covered porch when I tumble. When I started reloading I wet tumbled first. Does a bang up job of making shiny like-new cases. Unfortunately it also peens the case mouth and takes life off your cases. If you have access to extreme magnification look at one of your SS pin tumbled cases. They get fairly beat up especially if you keep them in for long periods. I still wet tumbled pistol cases but all my rifle cartridges go in the vibratory tumbler.
Maybe if you wet tumble them way too long. The longest I tumble is 1.5 hours for a very full drum, less with less brass. I'm actually trying a few different things to see if I can cut the time down even more for the same results.

One is to replace the steel pins with the Southern Shine chips, everything I;ve read says they clean much better (and quicker) than pins. Also going to use4 hot water instead of cold to see if that helps. I'm not going to increase the citric acid added to the water though as I don't want so much I have to start worrying about leeching zinc from the brass.

I heard about the whole peening thing and based on what I've read, some swear it shortens case life, some say it's a myth. I've looked at my cases and really don't see any issues.

I also dabble a little in photography and I have one of the best macro lenses ever made. Maybe I'll get some super close uip and magnified macro shots of the neck and casde mouths to see what it shows. It might just be the peening marks are so small I can't see them otherwise.
 

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I do a pre wash, as all my cases are pick ups. That prewash uses no pins.
Once cases are completely prepped, i wash using pins. Most of the time i run the barrel for about 45 mins for that final cleaning.
 

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Steel pins, tumbled with a drop or two of Dawn, a bit of Lemishine and water to cover the brass and pins.
When you get the mix right, you get brass cleaner than new.
I know the brass doesn't have to be shiny to be clean.
But a shiny case is much, much easier to inspect for defects; cracks etc.
 

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And they're much easier to find in the grass.

You can forego the Lemishine and just use powdered citric acid. It's a lot cheaper and the primary active ingredient in Lemishine (plus you can use it in cooking, candy making or drink mixing..if you like sour stuff).
 

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Steel pins, tumbled with a drop or two of Dawn, a bit of Lemishine and water to cover the brass and pins.
When you get the mix right, you get brass cleaner than new.
I know the brass doesn't have to be shiny to be clean.
But a shiny case is much, much easier to inspect for defects; cracks etc.
Yes. I agree that the cleaner and shinier it is the easier it is to inspect. I use Frankford's cleaner in my wet tumbler. A little goes a long way. I've used simple green occasionally, especially on an initial tumble to remove mud, but I've found that using too much simple green will actually cause the brass to darken from some chemical reaction. However, I have found that I get best results with hot water (the hottest I can get from the kitchen sink tap) and filling the tumbler all the way to the top with water seems to do a better job than using just enough to cover the brass and pins. Either way is probably fine though. I do like clean & shiny brass, and once it goes through the tumbler I never touch it again with bare hands. Always with gloves (thin nitrile or coated assembly gloves, depending on how long I plan to have them on - because sweating in the thin ones sucks - the assembly gloves are stretchy fabric with a thin polymer coating on the palms and inside of the fingers, which really reduces the sweat). Not touching that brass with my bare hands, ever, means those cases are still bright and shiny even years later. I store the prepped brass in cheap sealed plastic Walmart jars because they are also stored with the primers in and ready to be loaded when I want them. They do sometimes sit in the jars, waiting to be used, for several years at a time. I'm generally only shooting 2-3 thousand rounds per year in each of the six rifle calibers that I reload, and maybe twice that in the four pistol calibers that I reload, I typically have a two or three year supply of each, primed, and waiting in the jars. My major hobby now that I am retired and 73 years old.
 

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And they're much easier to find in the grass.

You can forego the Lemishine and just use powdered citric acid. It's a lot cheaper and the primary active ingredient in Lemishine (plus you can use it in cooking, candy making or drink mixing..if you like sour stuff).
On my semi-autos that have an under-slide rail, I use a brass catcher bag when testing loads, so nothing escapes in the grass or gets stepped on and ruined. You are right about them being easier to find when they are shiny though. When I'm not testing loads the catcher bag is a nuisance so I do find myself picking brass out of the weeds and grass (especially when shooting at a friend's place because his donkeys tend to pick up and eat anything they find in the grass, so he is pretty strict about picking ALL of the brass up).
 

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This...
Always with gloves (thin nitrile or coated assembly gloves, depending on how long I plan to have them on - because sweating in the thin ones sucks - the assembly gloves are stretchy fabric with a thin polymer coating on the palms and inside of the fingers, which really reduces the sweat). Not touching that brass with my bare hands, ever, means those cases are still bright and shiny even years later.
100%
A lot of what i load are bulk rounds that get boxed , vacuum sealed, and stored away. After the cases are processed, (sized, trimmed, belled, etc.) and go through the final cleaning, they are never touched by bare hands.
 

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This...

100%
A lot of what i load are bulk rounds that get boxed , vacuum sealed, and stored away. After the cases are processed, (sized, trimmed, belled, etc.) and go through the final cleaning, they are never touched by bare hands.
Have you had any problems with vacuum-sealing cartridges? Any ill effects like the bullets being slowly drawn out of the case mouths over time? One of the reasons that I haven't done that, or even tried that, is because of some stories I've read over the years. Seems like a great idea though.
 

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Vacuum sealing removes air from the container but isn’t a true vacuum. Even if you exposed a cartridge to a deep vacuum it would probably pull the air out of the case before it would unseat the bullet.
 

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Have you had any problems with vacuum-sealing cartridges? Any ill effects like the bullets being slowly drawn out of the case mouths over time? One of the reasons that I haven't done that, or even tried that, is because of some stories I've read over the years. Seems like a great idea though.
No, not at all. Also, have to remember that while you are drawing a partial vacuum, the external air pressure is pushing in.
Here is my packaging. Two of the 5.56 packs and three of the 9mm for each 30 cal ammo can.
Fluid Font Rectangle Composite material Pattern
 

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Thanks. I found the boxes after a lot of searching. Repackbox.com Nice guy that runs it. He has all sorts of boxes for different calibers. Each order ships with labels that you can print with your info.
I bought a date stamp just to make them clear and look more professional.
All the boxes are nice acid free heavy card stock.
 

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I looked at those and decided on plastic cartridge boxes, but, now that I'm cranking more and more rounds, I'm thinking of getting some to save money.

I think they come with a little rack thing you set the cartridges in, then you tip them into the box so they all go in nice and neat.
 

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I looked at those and decided on plastic cartridge boxes, but, now that I'm cranking more and more rounds, I'm thinking of getting some to save money.

I think they come with a little rack thing you set the cartridges in, then you tip them into the box so they all go in nice and neat.
You gotta buy the EZ loader separate, but i think they were like 3$.
The boxes are easily reusable if a guy really wanted to.
Like i said, i just use for bulk ammo. My hunting loads, test loads, SD loads, (small batch stuff), I use the plastic boxes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
My better half is in the extra bedroom taking down ugly wall paper so we can paint it for my man/cave/reloading room. She doesn't trust me to do it "right". There is definitely a time to leave them alone! 😁

I will never be a competitive shooter but I really want to get back into loading my own ammo and having my own cave. Getting a lot of good ideas here, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Thanks for the cleaning information. I'm somewhat near to needing it. The wife is almost through pulling down ugly wallpaper in the spare bedroom that is soon to become my painted man-cave (I don't have the patience). Then I'll either build or buy a table if I can find one. I'm not into building tables but have the patience to reload....go figure.

I unpacked all my reloading equipment and have everything but case cleaning equip. I'll probably wet clean cases. The stuff had been packed away for decades and it was kind of nostalgic. A three die set of RCBS dies had a price sticker of $10 and some change on it and all my dies are in new looking shape though used for thousands of rounds. There was some 22lr Thunderbolt in the box with 84¢ on the price sticker per box along with some 5.56 military ammo on stripper clips from Fort___ from the VN era.

My good analog Mitutoyo calipers were ruined I thought because the foam in the plastic case dried out and stuck to the calipers all over including the slide. I sprayed some 3M industrial delimonene (will take your skin off) on them carefully and they loosened up, rinsed, then I sprayed some GT85 on them and they'll salvage out good enough to slide well and be accurate. I had the RCBS mechanical scales packed away nicely so they should work. The powder measure and trikler should work but I'll check it out for accuracy. I also had a paper target with "110 yards, 1986 marked on it". It had a 5 shot, 30-06 group that was 3/4 of an inch with a Remington pump and 3 to 9 power Weaver scope. Wish I could see that well today.

It's a work in process. I just wish components weren't so ridiculously hard to find then pay for. The things we used to take for granted before stupidity kicked in......
 
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