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Decision made!!: I'm getting back into reloading just because I enjoyed it and have a hankering to enjoy it again. Not worried about cost. I already know it's expensive and components are hard to get but are "getable".

Have found a table that will work for less than I can make one for, have the room, and need to unpack my tooling to see exactly what I have and what else I will need to get besides digital scales. It's been that long. We used rocks and a stick balance ........:rolleyes:

QUESTION: What procedures are you guys using to get ammo brass clean back to polished bright looking? My standard is new S&B 9mm which is my favorite 9 mil ammo. It looks like someone hand polished it and I've seen pics of cleaned brass here that look darned nearly the same.....very little difference some people here are getting. I used to clean my brass but they looked nothing like what people are getting it back to today.
Appreciate the help and guidance! SG 馃槉 (y)
 

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This does a good enough job for me. I wash dry and throw them in the vibrator for an hour or so. They are deprimed and sized before washing.
 

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Lyman wet tumbler.
Hot water, Dawn platinum dish soap, white vinegar. 15 mins. Rinse.

Case prep

Lyman wet tumbler.
Hot water
1 to 2 capfuls Lyman Turbo Sonic cleaner.

Pristine!!!
ETA: I dry using an old food dehydrator. Also, I will add that i am pretty anal about cleaning cases because 99% of my brass is pick ups. We live next to an old volcano, so all the dirt is volcanic and can scratch the heck out of cases and dies alike.
 

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My pistol dies are carbide so they get sized and go right in the tumbler. Rifle dies get necks brushed , sized and washed in hot water and Dawn dish detergent. Dried on towel in sun or oven set at warm and then in tumbler . Only wash to remove case lube. It鈥檚 time consuming but I鈥檓 usually doing 37 other things at the same time.
 

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RCBS barrel tumbler w/steel pins and brass cleaner. Do 1,000 pistol cases at a time. Deprimed, primer pockets swaged, and resized before cleaning. Best setup I've ever used. Pins are a bit of a pain, but better than the dry media I used years ago. Not cheap but it works for me.
 

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I got one of these (but ordered mine on Amazon for less than half MSRP):


Got one of these to separate cases and media:


Got a 2lb pack of this (and it can be used in cooking and flavoring too):


Decap brass, load it in tumbler, fill with water, a squirt of Dawn and a teaspoon of the citric acid powder, run for 1 hour to 1 hour 30 mins (depending on number of cases). Once done, use separator, rinse well, then put brass on a cookie sheet and dry in oven at 195 degrees for an hour. Use a magnet to get all the stainless pins and put back in tumbler.

They come out like:

Motor vehicle Mass production Auto part Font Fish
 

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Decision made!!: I'm getting back into reloading just because I enjoyed it and have a hankering to enjoy it again. Not worried about cost. I already know it's expensive and components are hard to get but are "getable".

Have found a table that will work for less than I can make one for, have the room, and need to unpack my tooling to see exactly what I have and what else I will need to get besides digital scales. It's been that long. We used rocks and a stick balance ........:rolleyes:

QUESTION: What procedures are you guys using to get ammo brass clean back to polished bright looking? My standard is new S&B 9mm which is my favorite 9 mil ammo. It looks like someone hand polished it and I've seen pics of cleaned brass here that look darned nearly the same.....very little difference some people here are getting. I used to clean my brass but they looked nothing like what people are getting it back to today.
Appreciate the help and guidance! SG 馃槉 (y)
I wet tumble with stainless steel pins and dry in the sun (central Texas). One and a half to two hours will have that brass looking brand new, inside and out. I use brass catchers for my semi-autos, so the brass never touches the dirt. I prefer resizing and primer removal before tumbling to clean the bottoms of the primer pockets as well. I use a Frankford Arsenal tumbler. For 5.7x28mm brass, because the exterior lacquer coating on the brass must not be removed, I use a Hornady Ultra-Sonic cleaner after resizing and de-priming. Doesn't harm the coating and gets the brass absolutely clean (but not shiny) in about a hour to and hour and a half. Do any annealing before you wet tumble to remove that military-looking discoloration at the neck and shoulder.
 

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Where do you stand, Southern?

I have used walnut shell and crushed corn cob (2-1) for 40+ years. Still have half of the original boxes I bought.

In a Frankfort vibratory bowl, with the media and about 1/2 tsp of Nu-Finish car polish. I recapped everything in range bag, Lee Universal recapped. ( I don't want dirt from range pick up brass in resizing die. ) I dump all brass in vibrator and run 2-24 hrs. Just whenever I think to go turn it off. Seperate brass by caliber.
Lately, grandson does the deprime, polish, seperate.

Comes out looking like new brass. Slick and easy to examine for splits or defects.

I have looked at wet, but why add water to brass? I have been satisfied with the results I get. No reason to BUY equipment and change.
Though, the wet does work, too.
 

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I went with the wet method for a few reasons:

1. Faster. 1 to 1.5 hours for total clean and polished. Dry vibratory cleaning to this level usually takes longer. However, admittedly the time factor is mitigated by the need to dry the cases after wet tumbling.

2. Dry media often gets stuck in flash holes.

3. Dry vibratory tumbling is dusty.

4. Dry media absorbs lead and/or lead based substances from bullet residue in the neck or various lead compounds from primers. Then, it spews that contaminated dust in the air. Wet tumbling is like using fresh media every time you tumble and no dust clouds.
 

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My vibratory tumbler doesn鈥檛 make any dust. The top of the tumbler is made to as a screen to sift the media out of the cases. Just cover it while in operation.
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Where do you stand, Southern?

I have used walnut shell and crushed corn cob (2-1) for 40+ years. Still have half of the original boxes I bought.

In a Frankfort vibratory bowl, with the media and about 1/2 tsp of Nu-Finish car polish. I recapped everything in range bag, Lee Universal recapped. ( I don't want dirt from range pick up brass in resizing die. ) I dump all brass in vibrator and run 2-24 hrs. Just whenever I think to go turn it off. Seperate brass by caliber.
Lately, grandson does the deprime, polish, seperate.

Comes out looking like new brass. Slick and easy to examine for splits or defects.

I have looked at wet, but why add water to brass? I have been satisfied with the results I get. No reason to BUY equipment and change.
Though, the wet does work, too.
The wet tumbled brass does take a couple of hours to dry, but it isn't like I need to watch over it since I let the Texas sun and wind do everything for me. Wife always complained about the dry media dust and since I resize and punch the primers before I tumble (removes the case lube on the rifle brass from resizing) and was tired of discovering clumps of dry media stuck in the flas holes and sometimes in the cases too on 22 Hornet brass. Wet tumbling with steel pins solved that for me.
 

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I went with the wet method for a few reasons:

1. Faster. 1 to 1.5 hours for total clean and polished. Dry vibratory cleaning to this level usually takes longer. However, admittedly the time factor is mitigated by the need to dry the cases after wet tumbling.

2. Dry media often gets stuck in flash holes.

3. Dry vibratory tumbling is dusty.

4. Dry media absorbs lead and/or lead based substances from bullet residue in the neck or various lead compounds from primers. Then, it spews that contaminated dust in the air. Wet tumbling is like using fresh media every time you tumble and no dust clouds.
Yeah, those are all the reasons that I went with wet tumbling too, in addition to sometimes needing to wet tumble muddy (especially dried mud) brass before I can do anything with it and the wife complaining about the dry media dust. Pretty painless with wet tumbling.
 

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My vibratory tumbler doesn鈥檛 make any dust. The top of the tumbler is made to as a screen to sift the media out of the cases. Just cover it while in operation. View attachment 248413
My wife would strongly disagree about the claim of "My vibratory tumbler doesn鈥檛 make any dust". But regardless, you don't have to listen to her complaints. I do. So wet tumbling or ultra-sonic is it for me. Glad to hear your tumbler is working out for you. Been there, tried that and several other things, since 1970.
 

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I got one of these (but ordered mine on Amazon for less than half MSRP):


Got one of these to separate cases and media:


Got a 2lb pack of this (and it can be used in cooking and flavoring too):


Decap brass, load it in tumbler, fill with water, a squirt of Dawn and a teaspoon of the citric acid powder, run for 1 hour to 1 hour 30 mins (depending on number of cases). Once done, use separator, rinse well, then put brass on a cookie sheet and dry in oven at 195 degrees for an hour. Use a magnet to get all the stainless pins and put back in tumbler.

They come out like:

View attachment 247651
Yep. Mine too. I especially like the way they look when I wet tumble after annealing the rifle cases. Looks like brand new-from-the-factory
 

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Actually I drag it outside under the covered porch when I tumble. When I started reloading I wet tumbled first. Does a bang up job of making shiny like-new cases. Unfortunately it also peens the case mouth and takes life off your cases. If you have access to extreme magnification look at one of your SS pin tumbled cases. They get fairly beat up especially if you keep them in for long periods. I still wet tumbled pistol cases but all my rifle cartridges go in the vibratory tumbler.
 

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Actually I drag it outside under the covered porch when I tumble. When I started reloading I wet tumbled first. Does a bang up job of making shiny like-new cases. Unfortunately it also peens the case mouth and takes life off your cases. If you have access to extreme magnification look at one of your SS pin tumbled cases. They get fairly beat up especially if you keep them in for long periods. I still wet tumbled pistol cases but all my rifle cartridges go in the vibratory tumbler.
I had noticed that the cases can look dull rather than shiny if I wet tumble with steel pins for more than a couple of hours. It sounds (and looks) to me like you might be correct about the peening. Last time I saw that was when I wet tumbled some especially cruddy 45 ACP brass for more than three hours. Instead of being shiny, it looked frosted instead. I decided to be more careful after that.
 

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I have never had a dust issue. See lots of comments. A dryer sheet, cut into quarters. Add 1/4 and dust is gone, so I've heard.

I set vibrator on patio and do all cleaning, media sperating outdoors.

Occasionally, some media will be in flash hole. A dental pic pops it right out. I run pi around inside of primer pocket, anyway.

When resizing, the decamp pin clears flash hole, again.

Just never been an issue. Complaints about nothing.

Like most things, everybody has their preferred method. They all work.
 

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I have never had a dust issue. See lots of comments. A dryer sheet, cut into quarters. Add 1/4 and dust is gone, so I've heard.

I set vibrator on patio and do all cleaning, media sperating outdoors.

Occasionally, some media will be in flash hole. A dental pic pops it right out. I run pi around inside of primer pocket, anyway.

When resizing, the decamp pin clears flash hole, again.

Just never been an issue. Complaints about nothing.

Like most things, everybody has their preferred method. They all work.
yes. For me, the tumble is the final step of my case processing. Already done with annealing, resizing, trimming, neck turning, case gauging, flash hole normalizing, and primer pocket go/no going, any primer crimp removal, neck expanding, and a final inspection. After I tumble and let it dry it gets primed and jarred for when I am ready to load it up and shoot it. Loading with powder and a bullet can often be more than a year away from when I processed it. Sometimes three years away. I keep a lot of brass on hand, and it can take me several years to work my way to the bottom of the barrel marked "trimmed X times".
 

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Yep
I put the single stage in single stage.

I have couple thousand rounds cleaned and easy to process.
Another 4+ thousand are sized and primed
And then 10k rounds loaded.

Make a trip to the range and pick up everything I can reach.
 
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