American pilot POW

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by markw2011, Oct 6, 2012.

  1. markw2011

    markw2011 New Member

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    Today while in Schenectady Ny at a Air Force museum I got to meet a WW II Vet who was a B-17 pilot that got shot down in Germany. Apparently he was flying a escorted bombing mission, when his escorts fell for decoys and he was shot down by German fighters. All but three crew members made it out alive. He landed in a field only to be met by civilian women with pitch forks and was reluctantly captured by German forces. This guy spent 6 months as a POW in nazi Germany before being freed and them discharged.
    It was a real honor to get to meet this guy and to hear his story's. just look in this mans eyes as he was showing me pictures of his crew, and then pointed to the men he lost Is something ill never forget. it was just like something on the history channel but only in real life.
    I take my hat of to these guys, they deserve the utmost respect for their service to our country.
     
  2. markw2011

    markw2011 New Member

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    By the way. Despite successfully completing their bombing mission, of 12 B-17's that left that day, only 3 returned.
     

  3. dog2000tj

    dog2000tj New Member

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    Damn, now it makes me wish I had gone to work today. I could have met up with you two. :)

    I recently met a WWII Army vet who was a spotter for the Tuskegee air wing. He's a wonderful fellow to talk with and has some incredible stories.
     
  4. NitroxAZ

    NitroxAZ New Member

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    They have incredible stories. My wife's father who passed a couple of years ago had some amazing stories. He was a navigator that was on the bombers that flew into Pearl Harbor on that fateful day.

    He was a truly great man and I miss him and his stories.
     
  5. markw2011

    markw2011 New Member

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    Yeah I came down from Plattsburgh with my father in law, and a friend of our to check out the non existent gun shops in Utica and we stopped by Schenectady on our way back to check out the bombers and the p-51 mustang that was flown in for display for the weekend. I'm really glad I got to stop because I love hearing the stories from these guys. Plus the museum was pretty sweet
     

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  6. towboater

    towboater Active Member

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    My lawyer was shot down over Germany also. He was also a POW. He has some stories to tell. Thats for sure. He also said when he was a kid, his dad would pay him with a 5 dollar gold piece.
     
  7. boatme98

    boatme98 New Member

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    only to be met by civilian women with pitch forks and was reluctantly captured by German forces

    Mark, it's really great to talk to these guys isint it? I had a friend who was a bomber pilot out of England during WW II. His kids ignored him unless they needed money and all the locals thought he was just a crazy old man.
    Well, my dad was Air Force and so was I, so we struck up a friendship that lasted untill his death in2000.
    This man was the son of an Army general (no love lost there), became a pilot during WW II, served in Korea, and ended up an instructor at the very beginning of Vietnam. This man had an amazing life and absolutly nobody was interested in it until I met him.
    He told me stories that he claimed he had never told anyone else.
    I took him out to Arlington Natl. Cemetary and found his fathers grave. He'd never been there. Thatwas a pretty emotional day (my folks are there too, gave me an excuse for getting him there).
    Besides my father, I think the Colonel was one of the greatest men I have ever had the privelege of meeting.
    A humerous bit that always cracked me up-when he was in, he had a service #. In my era, we used soc. sec. #'s. You never forgot your service number, you could recite it in your sleep.
    But there was always somebody that would ask the Colonel "what was your service number?", without batting an eye or putting down his drink, he'd say "Three".
    An old pilots claim that after Wilbur and Orville, he was next.
    I tried and tried to get him to record some of his stories, but he refused.
    I surely do miss him.
    The Greatest Generation is almost gone, and it seems that almost nobody cares.
     
  8. markw2011

    markw2011 New Member

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    It really was a once in a lifetime opportunity to get to talk to this guy. I met WW 2 vets before, but never anyone that seen actual combat. You could tell that he was a pretty reserved guy but was willing to telling his story if someone was interested in listening to it. He did mention that he did not speek of combat for a really long time, and had suffered From PTSD. Or maybe he might have had kids who just didn't care like the vet you mentioned.
    Either way its not everyday you meet someone as wise and seasoned as these guys.
     
  9. towboater

    towboater Active Member

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    My uncle was in Okinawa. He had it very rough. He did tell me some stories, but I know there was much he didn't tell. They sure endured a real hell.

    He was also on the history channel. "Okinawa shootout" There are 5 parts to it. He is in part 5/5
    His name is Jack Mullikin.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&v=C_vhKYQQU8Q&NR=1
     
  10. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    The stories remind us that sacrifice is timeless and so are the heroes we remember fondly. The Kids are the ones that really need to hear these but most are too busy tweeting their next bowel movement!

    We lost an old friend a few years ago (Former Marine) that every once in a while would talk about his time on Iwo. 22 days nonstop defending a hole they chipped into the lava rock, by the time they got out, the NME's bodies were stacked like cord wood around them, he was 17 years old at the time! God bless and keep them all till we meet again!
     
  11. lawman3980

    lawman3980 New Member

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    My father served in England during WWII. He was with the 96th Bomber Group of the 8th Air Force. He was there for three years and survived his share of missions. I remember he would tell stories, usually the funny ones, when I was a kid. I remember he and I were watching a movie called 12 O'clock High with Gregory Peck (my father believed it was filmed on his base in England). In the movie there was a combat scene that showed actual combat video and audio. In the scene a B17 was seen smoking and rolling over as it went down. The audio that accompanied it a man said "there goes another Charlie" which was my fathers group. When I heard that I looked at my dad and he was sitting there with that 1000 yard stare and his eye has welled up with tears. It was the first time I had ever seen him tear up. He then told me a story of a mission where they put 20 bombers in the air and only 4 returned. I was only about 10 at the time and didn't understand a lot about war then. I miss him.
     
  12. WebleyFosbery38

    WebleyFosbery38 New Member

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    Ive mostly heard the funny stories like you Lawman. The Band of Brothers theme was so strong in these people. They did try to make thes best out of the worst situations and when they came home, they reinvigorated the nation with their stories, fortitude and devotion to our nation and their families.

    Does anyone remember the commercials back in the day, "Don't forget, hire the Vet"? We couldn't get enough Veterans to fill the jobs back then. The military has created more leaders than every single college and university in this nation combined, we know that is true. Employers recognized that the US Military seal of approval meant they were getting a high quality, field tested product and we owed those Vets our Lives and at least a job as a small debt of gratitude.

    Today, Veterans status falls somewhere between Once owned Sheep and I have a gay son. If your an American African, transgendered, Lesbian, Hermaphrodite of American Indian heritage, your getting the job! The only Veterans getting any attention are the ones weve mortally wounded. Nobody with a heart would deny they deserve the very best we can offer but how about their comrades?

    Most of the Vets I served with have been deployed at least once and many have been to both sandboxes, multiple times. They truly are our future, no less so than our greatest generation that has for the most part now moved on to their next and final duty station. They were the greatest because we recognized their strengths and encouraged them to teach us what they know without living what they nearly died for.

    The greatest generation will always be the next one to come but only if we treat it with the respect and dignity it deserves by preserving the principles that allowed the last greatest generation to earn that hallmark.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2012
  13. lawman3980

    lawman3980 New Member

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    Web key Fosbery I couldn't have put it better. I served in the Army for four years, mostly with the 1st Cav and I've spent the last 20+ in law enforcement. During the interviews on the last promotion test they asked a friend of mine questions regarding college credits but nothing about his service in the Navy. I know an education is important but I've met many college grads that had no common sense what so ever. It's like military service is a "oh that's nice" kind of thing. It's sad.