Alloy frame lifetime?

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by Jstrong, Dec 13, 2012.

  1. Jstrong

    Jstrong New Member

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    So what's the general consensus between y'all die-hard 1911 guys. What is to be expected from an aluminum frames longevity relative to a standard steel frame? If you had s choice between the two and the alloy frame was 6 ounces lighter would that be enough to sway you at the cost of diminished lifetime? For an EDC btw.
     
  2. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Can't really guess & not smart enuff to know :eek:
    Tho i've had several lite framed Commanders that were many many yrs young & reallly cud see no "wear"-
     

  3. Jstrong

    Jstrong New Member

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    Did some research and the standard aluminum alloy used in guns has a tensile strength of 83,000 psi,while the steel that is most commonly used has a tensile strength of 240,000 psi. Seems pretty significant to me,so its got me wondering how that difference really translates into actual the longevity of a firearm. Thought someone here may have experiences with both and would be able to comment. I know there's some users here that shoot the snot out of their guns and have achieved high enough round counts to testify to the matter.
     
  4. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    I had the same question a while back on here. Basically the alloy will out live you, but I wanted to buy an heirloom and have it passed down for generations... hopefully. I ended up with the kimber ultra carry HD II. Full stainless and I love it.
     
  5. limbkiller

    limbkiller New Member

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    How many rounds are you "really" gonna shoot through the gun. 3,000 rds., 10,000 rds. or 50,000 rds.. Really c'mon most people don't shoot enough to tear up an aluminum frame gun. Do you realize the cost of 20,000 rds at today's prices even reloading? You will not ever wear out an aluminum frame unless your rich and shoot several times a week for years. It's a non issue for 99.9% of gun owners. Just internet B.S. for people who don't have a clue to talk about. Buy the aluminum framed gun and forget about it as it will not likely ever happen that you wear one out. Doesn't matter anyway if you buy a gun with a lifetime warranty like Colt or Springfield Armory. Please stay away from overpriced, lousy CS, and ONE year warranty Kimber.
     
  6. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    Well I have two kimbers and love them both. Don't know why you need to slam my choice in buying them, but hey to each his own. There is a reason Kimber's are one the best. Regardless of their warranty
     
  7. jakewpns

    jakewpns New Member

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    Kimber makes great quality firearms, anyone who bashes them over a 1 year warranty obviously dont understand what having a good quality product is. Id rather have a great product with a 1 year warranty and never have to use it, than a shoddie or subpar product with a lifetime warranty that you are gonna use repeatedly. I havent had the need for kimbers cs or warranty. I buy a quality 1911 because of its fit/finish/great feeling trigger, and not because if itd fubar they will fix it over and over again
     
  8. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    You buy an alloy gun to carry, you buy a steel gun to shoot.
     
  9. Jstrong

    Jstrong New Member

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    Well the plan is to put a box of ammo down range every week as long as funds allow,which shouldn't be too bad if I go on free lane day..If I carry it,I am of the opinion that I should be as proficient in its use. So a box of ammo a week would be 2600 rounds a year,so if say probably about 2000 a year to be on the safe side since I know I won't make it every week. But then again I'm sure some trips I'll shoot more than others.

    Also i should mention that I would like this gun to last long enough to be an heirloom.
     
  10. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    I have a cdp custom II that I know I have at least 15,000 rounds and possibly up to 25,000 rounds that is still tight and reliable.
     
  11. Jstrong

    Jstrong New Member

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    Well cane I can't afford both,especially with the brand I'm going with. Dan Wesson.

    Question here is do I go ahead and take the alloy,or go with the steel suck it up and carry the extra 6 ounces and be sure I'll have a gun that should last tilli give it to my kid and then some.
     
  12. jakewpns

    jakewpns New Member

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    6 oz really doesnt make that much of a difference. I carry a steel frame
     
  13. jakewpns

    jakewpns New Member

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    6 oz really doesnt make that much of a difference. I carry a steel frame 1911 every day and know if the time comes and my adrenalines pumping an extra 6 oz wont feel like s***. so my personal preference is all steel
     
  14. rock185

    rock185 Member

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    Jstrong, Just personal experience, not internet BS as has been suggested. I purchased a new .45 ACP Colt Commander in 1980. I had been carrying a full sized steel-framed Government off duty and just wanted a lighter 1911 type gun. My new Commander was reliable, sgnificantly lighter and fit the bill. After very moderate use, the frame cracked vertically on the left side, in the area where the slide impacts the frame with each shot fired. I stop-drilled the crack and the gun still sees occasional use by a family member. Two co-workers showed me their new SIG P226 9MM pistols. Those guns, purchased new, and fired a few hundred rounds during the semi-auto transition course cracked horizontally within the frame rails. SIG replaced both guns under warranty. Again, not internet BS, personal experience. In a Shooting Times artcle years ago, Skeeter Skelton did a 5000 rd. test of a Light weight Commander and a Gold Cup. Sometime during the test, the Commander's frame cracked. He indicated the Commander was still usable, but really needed a new frame. Jeff Cooper indicated that he believed the Lt. Wt. Commander was a gun to be carried a lot, and shot a little. I think Col. Cooper was on the right track there.

    Anyway, I think the lightweight 1911 types are ok, but carried the the full sized steel gun 40+ hours a week for several years, and if carrying a 1911 anywhere, now days, it's the 5" steel framed version...ymmv

    Ps, during the past year, I've become a DW owner. The DWs are a cut above most production 1911s, IMHO.
     
  15. Jstrong

    Jstrong New Member

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    Thank you for the insight,while I do plan on carrying this gun I always have been of the opinion that you practice with what you carry. So I do believe this gun will get shot a pretty good amount.
     
  16. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    ............
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012
  17. Jstrong

    Jstrong New Member

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    Very insightful,would you care to elaborate?
     
  18. DarinCraft

    DarinCraft New Member

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    Responded to the wrong post so I deleted it
     
  19. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Buy a Colt!
     
  20. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    See post #19.