again?

Discussion in 'Legal and Activism' started by wmille01, Apr 19, 2011.

  1. wmille01

    wmille01 New Member

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    I get really tired of hearing about these things, I don't understand how hard it is for parents to keep guns away from their kids. When I was a kid if I even looked at my dad guns he smacked me against my head, I wasn't allowed to shoot until I 9. It really makes me wonder what in the hell the kid was thinking... or not.

    3 kindergartners wounded when gun discharges at Houston school - CNN.com
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 21, 2011
  2. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Well, I don't think many people fully realize(especially inexperienced

    parents, or children raising children) that kids have a magical, mystical talent for

    trouble and the verboten.

    They just don't understand that hiding it, covering it, or putting it

    on a high shelf isn't enough.

    If you "get it", you lock up the guns, lock up the ammo, and keep the keys

    on your person at all times.
     

  3. oldshooter

    oldshooter New Member

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    Another way to protect your kids is to take the mystery away form the "forbidden" objects.
    I always told my kids if they wanted to see or touch one of my guns to just ask. I stopped what I was doing and spent time with them. I started my kids shooting very early and it paid off with my youngest. He did 3 tours in Iraq and 1 in Afghanistan and came home in one piece.
    If you want the kids to respect a weapon then spend time with them.
    "lecture over"
     
  4. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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    All three of my kids (7, 10, 12) fully understand about guns and the consequences of touching a gun in my house without my permission. My 10 year old boy got a 20 gauge shotgun for his 10th birthday and that gun is in the cabinet with all the other guns. My 7 year old fired his first shots from a .22 this week. He has been to my range several times when we have been shooting and would not dare lay a finger on a gun without my say so. Finally I let him shoot a few times this week after going several times.

    I have taken the mystery out of guns in my house. I don't hide them and never speak of them. I don't give exceedingly long lectures on the dangers of guns. I don't act like some a-hole trying to show off with a gun. I treat them for what they are, tools and inanimate objects, and expect my children to treat them with the respect that they deserve.
     
  5. jayguy

    jayguy New Member

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    Its all about discipline.
     
  6. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    I grew up like Oldshooter described. No mystique about our guns. I could tell my stepfather at any time that I wanted to see the guns and he would put aside whatever he was doing and get them all out. We would clean and oil them, he would explain how they all worked and then we would put them away again. Together.
     
  7. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Unfortunately, many people seem to think "discipline" just means you

    have to beat your kids.

    It's about letting them know what your expectations are, and

    conditioning them to respond properly.

    As oldshooter said, it's about spending your time with them.
     
  8. jayguy

    jayguy New Member

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    Very true.
     
  9. wmille01

    wmille01 New Member

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    I'm not saying that people should beat there kids it's just what my dad did you know old days, now a days it abuse. I can understand why people are worried about there kids, I can understand why some people beat there kids. When I was younger I spent most of my time doing stupid stuff that got me in trouble, I wouldn't have trusted me around guns then either.

    Honestly if your kid(s) was doing stupid stuff on a regular basis would you really trust them with a weapon at least at a young age. This kid should not have been able to get a hold of the gun, I'm not saying that the parents are bad parents just that they could have taken more step to make sure that something like this didn't happen.
     
  10. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Same here! ;)
     
  11. cuate

    cuate New Member

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    My Grandfather taught me gun safety, handling, shooting, and bird hunting when I was seven. I have done the same with my girls and boys. Hunting & Fishing was life to rural kids and even town kids somewhat when I was growing up. A part of life so to speak.
     
  12. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    ..........
     

    Attached Files:

  13. pandamonium

    pandamonium New Member

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    ^^^^^exactly!!!^^^^^
     
  14. culdee

    culdee New Member

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    yes!

    I whole heartedly agree. I worked it this way with my daughter and now she is out shooting precision rifle to 1k yards, tactical carbine, is a certified handgun instructor and works Close Personal Protection for a living. Locking them up will only increase the mystique and if they find one at a friends house someone will still get hurt because they are uneducated.
     
  15. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    Whoa, slow down, OP, sometimes physical punishment or other
    methods to display your disapproval are very necessary.

    All I'm trying to point out is there is more to discipline than
    merely beating a child. Proper discipline, like proper diet, is a noun,
    NOT a verb...
     
  16. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Ross Elementary is in the HOOD! One of many "hoods" in Houston. The only gun safety taught in most homes is how to shoot sideways from a moving car. Very doubtful you will find a single NRA member residing in that zip code. Houston is the 4th largest city in the Country and has the 3rd higest homicide rate. Houston/Harris County has more people on Death Row/executed (402) that the entire state of Florida has on Death Row currently (393)!
     
  17. culdee

    culdee New Member

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    good point

    very good point. out of political correctness, the news is often filtered or totally manipulated to support an agenda, gain sympathy, sway opinion or fudge the numbers of a poll. As Paul Harvey would say "now for the rest of the story." In some hoods gun safety simply means shooting first.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2011
  18. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    +1

    My son, daughter and grand kids live in the Houston area. The crime situation got much worse when the so called "Katrina victims" converged on Houston and never left. Seems that welfare is easier to get in Houston than in New Orleans: It pays more in Houston too.

    Exactly. Ultra liberal news organizations have an agenda. They never tell "the rest of the story".
     
  19. diggsbakes

    diggsbakes New Member

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    Very true. These area's and the Katrina flooding (people not water) into the area are responsible for Houston being known as the "Armpit" of The Great State of Texas. (Not saying I agree or not with that assessment)

    At any rate this incident should NOT be a general representation of the "result" of a parent being irresponsible with firearms. It should just be another case of a child growing up in a bad environment and the poor and/or lack of parenting that is the norm for that area.

    I was raised around firearms and shot them at 5, carried rifles and .22 revolvers by 10, unsupervised. I got a safety lesson before each session and knew how to treat firearms. . . SAFELY!

    If you tell a child to simply "not touch" they are gonna want to touch. My daughters are familiar with guns being around, but have been given many safety lessons and know not to touch when Dad's not around. They will be shooting rim fires soon though. Oldest is 5! Prime age!
     
  20. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    Discipline starts as soon as the child is self-aware, once that time passes if you haven't taken the lead it is often monumentally difficult to regain your position as a parent rather than an equal. I have never had to use physical discipline methods with my boys in over 15 years (as a matter of fact that would have been counter-productive with my youngest son and would have served to alienate my older son out of fear.) We have a strong relationship and they respect me (although sometimes they will test that as boys will do). I started conditioning them to the fact that guns are in the house and not to be touched as soon as they began to understand the differences between objects in their lives (they started knowing the difference between a dog and a stuffed animal for instance).

    This went on and developed over time to be something similar to the NRA Eddie Eagle program (more or less). I would periodically run "tests", leaving an unloaded gun somewhere in the house where they would come across it to see what they would do. Without fail they would not touch it and as soon as they saw it they would come running to get me or their Mom. I would also tell them every time that they would one day be trained on how to safely handle and shoot guns when their Mom and I decided they were ready, which ended up being at 7 years old for the oldest and 6 for the younger brother.... Mom's decision. I was angling towards 5 years old but we had to be in total agreement for it to work. They were also told that there was no room for accidents or mistakes. One accident or mistake would result in them being unable to handle guns for a longer period of time. Period.

    That conditioning still works today now that they are handling firearms on an almost daily basis. If there is a gun left somewhere where it doesn't belong (regardless of where we are) they do not touch it, they notify me or another adult to its presence. Every gun is checked for safe every time it is handled, even if it is handed from one person who has just checked it to another who watched the first person check it. No room for mistakes.