Advise on a cat

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by bigbomar4, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. bigbomar4

    bigbomar4 New Member

    453
    0
    0
    One of the local cats has adopted me. It's been hangin around my yard for almost 3 weeks. He was keeping the birds away from my plants so I didn't really mind. Until today he had always been really timid even for a cat. Today after mowing the lawn I sat down in my chair on the porch and he just jumped up in my lap.

    I've never had a cat before or even really like cats but this one seems pretty cool. Any advise if I decide to let him stick around?
     
  2. fmj

    fmj Active Member

    3,460
    0
    36
    Well, it sounds to me the flealine has made up your mind for you.

    If hes doing his job (killing pests) i would say you reciprocate with shots, flea treatments and dinner.

    I dislike cats, but i have one here that for whatever reason LOVES me....he kills mice, when he runs out of mice to kill goes after squirells, rabbits, cicadas, whatever. So he gets flea treatments and healthcare for his work.
     

  3. Zombiegirl

    Zombiegirl New Member

    4,126
    1
    0
    Cats are great! You should let him stick around. Cats don't like everybody and it obviously has taken a shine to you.
     
  4. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    cats are somewhat different than dogs in who they get close to. a dog, pretty much as long as your nice to them, feed them they can cozy up to just about anyone. cats are more apt to them choosing you, rather than you choosing them.

    but it sounds like he's already decided on choosing your! feed him, love him and show him some affection, and he'll be a close companion!:D
     
  5. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

    1,115
    0
    0
    I've had cats for years. They make great pets and are beneficial in keeping the critter population in your yard under control. good luck
     
  6. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

    4,993
    52
    48
    My wife and my son both have cats. They are great animals. They require little care. If you let him in the house you will need a litter box. If you do not let him in, you wont have to worry about it. Give him a can of cat food or some tuna. If you are going to become his owner you should get him his shots. Cats are not expensive to take care of. I really like both of ours.
     
  7. bobski

    bobski Well-Known Member Sponsor

    6,373
    37
    48
    they are great comfort and wonderful pets, and will break your heart when they get sick and die.
    had over 400 in my lifetime.

    feed it, it will stick around. dont feed it and it will leave.
    if you can afford it, enjoy it.
    bring it to a vet and get it shots.
    destemper
    rabies
    worm him and flee wash him.
    check for ear mites.
    have the vet scan it to see if it has an owner chip i.d. in it.
    brush him once a day.
    feed him twice a day.
    if hes going to be an outdoor cat, give him shelter in a shed etc...
    check to see if its a stray indoor cat that got out by checking for de-clawed paws. declawed? bring him in and keep him in at night. he cant defend himself by climbing. poop box is next and a beddy.
    flee drops monthly.
    make surehe gets some form of fish oil to keep coat shiney.
    wash him every 3 months or when stinky.
    check for ear mites weekly.
    if its a girl, keep her away from males or guess what?
    IF YOU HAVE A BOY, NOODERING WONT KEEP HIM FROM SPRAYING.
    the longer you are around cats, the less you will smell him. but restassure, others will!!!!
    plan on 4 to 5 grand in care for 4 years.
    dogsare 7-10 grand and are 100% HIGHER MAINT.
    enjoy your cat!
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013
  8. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    I hate cats. But it seems like this one is proving to be more of a benefit than a nuisance. As said, any good employer makes sure their employees have food, the means to get food, and healthcare. The cat's working for you apparently, providing a service, if you will. Only fair to make his efforts worthwhile.
     
  9. buckhuntr

    buckhuntr Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    3,853
    156
    63
    Unless your wife decides to give the Persian kitty a haircut with scissors, and you end up at a pet hospital... On a Sunday... After 5pm. :eek::(
    I think that one cost $300...
     
  10. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

    4,993
    52
    48
    Wow Bobski...that is a lot more than we do. Our cats go to the vet once a year to get a check up and shots. That is it unless they get sick. We buy dry cat food and use a dispenser. They eat it at their leisure. One of the cats is old. He is about 12 or so. He is my son's cat. He requires a very expensive cat food. He has something like Irritable Bowel but for a cat. There is nothing the vet can do. My son cuts up a piece of chicken breast for him once a day. That is like their "father and son time". LOL. Jackson (cat) sees my son (Daniel) grab a knife and a plate and he comes running.

    Even with the special care my son's cat gets we don't spend anywhere near $1000 a year.
     
  11. bigbomar4

    bigbomar4 New Member

    453
    0
    0
    He will be an outside cat.

    His claws aren't trimmed so I think he is just a stray.

    How much does it generally cost to get all of the shots and to get him snipped?
     

    Attached Files:

  12. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,461
    610
    113
    We have had cats since we were married. They will clear the yard of moles, are hell on mice, and have kept our babies company. I really do think that cats reflect the personality of their owners- ours have always been very laid back little folks- others have high strung, somewhat neurotic cats.

    Sounds as is you have a pet that got dumped or lost. As said, if you are going to put cat on payroll, get him/her signed up for bennies.

    Frontline Flea & Tick- it is about 4-5 drops, packed in a unit dose applicator, apply one to the back of the neck each month, no fleas. Not cheap, works. Get it from your vet, or order it on line. Get cat to vet for shots, neutering (especially if girl, or you will be up to your armpits in kittens)

    Our cats are mainly outdoor, but if they come in the house, have a litter box. Since they lack opposable thumbs, they cannot open the door to go out. You will learn that each cat has a personality. My boy likes to wrestle, roughhouse a bit- his sister- runt of the litter and half his size, is the demure little lady that wants to sit on my shoulder and watch what I am doing. Thunderstorm? They want to be about 6 inches away from the boss.

    Will give you fair warning- you will get attached more than you think. And part of the problem with life- some folks last too long, and most pets don't.
     
  13. JonM

    JonM Moderator

    20,110
    19
    38
    have it spayed or neutered. asap. dont declaw. cats need their claws. declawing a cat is like defingering a human.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  14. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    I like that. Mind if I share it?
     
  15. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,000
    0
    0
    Nomad, claws grow very fast, even when trimmed. Also, many pets turn feral within 6-8 weeks of being dumped, so he obviously is not far from either a dump or someone that took care of him.

    I agree with the others - first step is a vet for scanning and shots. Feed him in a garage or shed, if you don't want him indoors because cat food left outside attracts every other neighborhood cat. Also a spay or neuter clinic should make him less dangerous to the rest of the neighborhood. The initial vet visit and spay clinic will probably be your biggest outlay - after that its frontline for fleas once a month and shots once a year.
     
  16. trip286

    trip286 New Member

    18,658
    1
    0
    A note: if you tell the clinic it's a stray you're taking in and taking care of, they may give you a discount on spay or neutering costs, and possibly even shots. I've heard of some doing it for free "for a limited time" under these circumstances.

    You may possibly even be able to take it to the local shelter or humane society, explain the situation, and receive a voucher or coupon.

    Always worth a try in saving a few bucks.
     
  17. Steel_Talon

    Steel_Talon New Member

    1,766
    0
    0
    ;);)

    I'm going to add this to my quip of repartee's :D
     
  18. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    the only way i would ever suggest declawing is a cat that would never under any reasons to go outside and was an only pet. one of the cats we gave my MIL, we had declawed and fixed. he is the only pet she has and is spoiled rotten!

    if they are outside pets or have to share space with other pets, never get them declawed.
     
  19. Steel_Talon

    Steel_Talon New Member

    1,766
    0
    0
    Take care of him, provide him a comfy warm space inside, allow him free access in and out of your house. Also have a litter box inside for him. Get him fixed before he starts Tom catting around.
     
  20. AR10

    AR10 New Member

    2,264
    0
    0
    Cats are good for your karma. Take care of him, and the universe will reciprocate.

    There is another thread on charity. This is the best charity going, taking an interest in tiny creatures .