Advice please.

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by xdm11chad, Aug 5, 2012.

  1. xdm11chad

    xdm11chad New Member

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    I am looking for after market triggers and dont know where to look I want a good trigger, light, and crisp. Also does different bolts make a difference on how my weapon performs it will be a gas driven gun for target shooting mid to long range in 5.56
     
  2. dfergus8

    dfergus8 New Member

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    Check out the giselle ssa-e. I would just use the bolt that works reliably.
     

  3. Alpha1Victor

    Alpha1Victor New Member

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    I think a Timmy trigger is a great option. I have one in multiple ar's that I own. And when you say mid to long range, what kind of range are you talking about?
     
  4. xdm11chad

    xdm11chad New Member

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  5. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    Check out Rock River Arms' 2 stage trigger, good trigger for target/varmint guns.

    Assuming proper headspacing and solid lock up, I don't see how the bolt would make a significant difference in accuracy. But I have been wrong before.
     
  6. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    What do u want to spend on a trigger? There are lots of great choices out there. You need to decide if u want a single or 2 stage trigger
     
  7. xdm11chad

    xdm11chad New Member

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    I
    Don't know the difference in single or 2 stage haha explain please
     
  8. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    A single stage trigger is typically what came with the rifle...all the finger press weight builds until it reaches it's break point...about 6-8 lbs. This is fine for 99% of shooters that would not benefit from the feel of a two stage (I know I am going to get flamed for that but it's my opinion) ;) What some do not like is that the break point is reached without any indication or feedback. Again that's fine for average shooters plinking at the range but more experienced or longer range shooters like to have feedback and control so they can sync their breathing, etc with the trigger break.

    With a two stage trigger, the first stage is loaded up much like a traditional one stage, the difference is that it reaches a second point in the trigger press before the break. There is a noticable tactile feedback to the shooter and a more predictable final breakpoint.

    A good two stage trigger will set you back several hundred $, a good one stage can be had for about half that cost. There are also several vendors that market battle triggers or enhanced single stage triggers that smooth out the grittyness without reducing the pull weight or mass of the trigger or sear.

    As for the bolt...different bolts will have little or no effect on accuracy but recoil management, cycling and reliability are key concerns. The lighter or heavier the bolt, the faster or slower it will cycle. Too low a cycle rate and you may see in-battery failure, fail-to-feed, etc. Too high a cycle rate you may get torn casing rims, jams, recoil shock, etc. Keep an eye on your brass...if its falling at your feet there's too little action...if it's landing in the next county there's too much. A neat little pile at 3-4 o'clock, 4-5 feet away should suffice.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012
  9. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    it doesnt if its properly headspaced and locks tight in the barrel extension. whats really important is if the reciever shoulder is cut square and the threading is concentric. this is an area that lower end guns often just take a pass on since most folks arent going to put their guns to that sort of shooting. its also why guns like bcm DD etc arent often seen in accuracy roles. milspec doesnt = accuracy in the sense of drilling single holes at very long ranges. you have to build to tighter tolerances with special attention to certain areas.

    one of the reasons rra and white oak dominate cmp service rifle matches
     
  10. AgentTikki

    AgentTikki New Member

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    Btw I'd consider 200 yards short range, and 400 yards mid range.

    150 to 250 yards is on the shorter range of the spectrum. Pretty crazy huh. That's why rifles are primaries and handgunds are secondary.

    Also gas pistons aren't the best choice for pecision work.

    Honestly stick with a milspec trigger at first. Get a target trigger later, you may just find the milspec will be suitable for what your needs. If you want for somthing more, upgrading is easier later.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012
  11. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    if you have never shot a 2 stage you really need to before you plop down $200 on one . I like to shoot in the 300-400 yard range but I do not care for a 2 stage and I have tried a couple different triggers and have gone back to the single stage in my target rifle but it is light , has no take up and breaks like glass . Some people like 2 stage better and some people like single stage better . Shoot one a decide on what you like best , you can lighten the trigger pull with some JP or Wolff hammer springs but you will sometimes get a light strike and it not go off so keep that in mind , simple fix for that is a lightened hammer which will usually fix that problem . I like to take my stock springs and ever so slightly bend the legs back a bit it takes some of the weight out of them ,