Adrenaline Training

Discussion in 'Training & Safety' started by GlockStar, Sep 6, 2011.

  1. GlockStar

    GlockStar New Member

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    A post about the affects of adrenaline in another thread led me to create this topic. Bare with me, as it might not be as put together as I would have liked.

    Basically, anytime your life is in danger, be it a fist fight or a gun fight, adrenaline takes over. Now for our LEO's and Soldiers, this isn't much of a problem. Considering that they have spent a large portion of their adult lives training for just this reason. They fall back on good training and solid repetitions which usually serves them well in chaos.

    Where does that leave the rest of us? My girlfriend for example, she has no problems at the range when it comes to clearing malfunctions, changing mags, or any of the other simple tasks that go along with operating a firearm. Kick her door in and she would most likely be frazzled to the point where she is nowhere near as effective with that firearm as she really is. Forgetting one simple step could be the difference between life and death.

    I guess what I hope to achieve by this is as follows: Does anyone know of any legit ways to trigger adrenaline or at least simulate it? I do not feel comfortable yelling at her like a Drill Sargent and I do not believe she is going to handle her firearm nearly enough to make it an extension of her hand.

    That being said, do you feel a once a week shooter is going to have the skill set to fall back on when adrenaline takes over and you are no longer "conscious" of every action you make so to speak?
     
  2. rockhouse

    rockhouse New Member

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    I'm not sure of stimulating adrenalin but I believe the effects that you are looking for are increased heart rate and speed. To add a since of adrenalin I would make it a competition with her. Bet dinner, chores or something like that between the two of you to create a since of urgency. Create a routine where you perform a number of jumping jacks or some sort of exercise then sprit 10-20 yards to the firing line, load the magazine and fire. Increase difficulty to shoot at multiple targets from left to right or however you want. If someone were looking to do you harm they aren't going to stay stationary so this is a good way to practice a "moving target".
     

  3. GlockStar

    GlockStar New Member

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    I really like the jumpingjack and sprinting concept!! We would have to find a secluded place to shoot as I feel that wouldn't fly with my local range.
     
  4. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    How often do you think the military and police train? Yeah every day can be a training experience, but I didn't make it to the range once a week when I was active duty. I only made it for marksmanship qualifications once in bootcamp, and twice while I was active duty on camp lejeune. and I was infantry. I made it to the machine gun range about once a month. Go ahead and keep what you're doing, and throw some competition into. Some formal competition wouldn't be out of line either, like IDPA.
     
  5. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    Doing things over and over is the best training. The thought is that your body does these things automatically with out willful thought in stress situations. So basically just what you are doing now. Doesn't hurt to mix it up a little to.
     
  6. BigByrd47119

    BigByrd47119 New Member

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    LEO Academy Cadets in my area typically will run for a mile and a half, one minute of sit-ups, then one minute of push-ups, then sprint to the firing line and shoot. Apparently, it can be very insightful. (This routine usually ends with the run)
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    unfortunately there isnt a real way to induce the fight or flight boost of your survival system coming online in a non-threat training situation.

    the best way to prepaire is by shooting a lot. training on stoppages etc. what your trained to do tends to carry over under stress. the best you can do is train hard and hope it carries over.

    failure drills with dummy rounds helps. load mags for your partner slip in a few duds now and then. then let them do it for you. its a good drill.

    doing the cardio stuff is nothing like the stress of fight or flight time. all the cardio stuff helps with is training while your tired :)

    probably the closest you can get is competition. the stresses can be similar.
     
  8. CourtJester

    CourtJester Well-Known Member

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    I have a long time friend that is in the special forces. He's said that he shoots on his own at least once or twice a week at a local range for his own personal training. Says he can double tap, do 50 push ups, break down the gun, put it back together, and double tap on target again in as he put it "well under 3 minutes." Never seen it and not sure how far he breaks it down but knowing him, I wouldn't doubt it.
    The only adrenalin that I get personally comes from sport bikes and keeping calm with UAW employees at work.
     
  9. PerpetualStudent

    PerpetualStudent New Member

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    JonM is spot on with his post. The adrenaline you get from working out and the adrenaline you get from fight-or-flight are very, very different.

    I have actually been searching for ways to bring this sense of realism to unarmed self defense training. I would think that getting a duplicate of her weapon that only fires blanks and then intentionally scaring the life out of her will instill that mentality.

    The good thing is that the human brain learns things extremely quickly. Once you have that fear response in place, it will stay. But, I've only ever tested it with my students in unarmed.

    The Mind is like a Parachute. It only works when it's open.
     
  10. PerpetualStudent

    PerpetualStudent New Member

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    Oops, sorry, I meant armed. Not unarmed. I've done this unarmed. Was pretty happy with the results. I was just curious how to apply the concept in armed SD.

    The Mind is like a Parachute. It only works when it's open.
     
  11. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    this just doesn't sound too safe to me.
     
  12. PerpetualStudent

    PerpetualStudent New Member

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    Yeah, I am trying to figure a way to get the realism without the danger. I don't know exactly about doing it from a dead sleep, LOL. I can see that leading to heart problems.

    But, what i did was catch my students by surprise (we are all friends and hang out together as well) and jump out and see how they reacted. Then critiqued as necessary. But, what I noticed was that in that case, what we worked on stuck fairly well.

    Mostly, they focused on situational awareness and rounding blind corners or dark areas. It was also a barrel of laughs afterwards. "Hey, did you guys see his face?!" "Umm...did you just yelp?"

    If there were a way to replace their firearm with one that is identical but completely safe and have other friends from the training group act in the bad guy role.

    But, beware the liability issues. Make sure that you only do it with people that you trust completely and trust you completely. Some people do not take kindly to getting the hell scared out of them.

    What I did was tell my guys what I was going to do and asked them if they wanted to participate. I just wouldn't bother those that wouldn't want to. But, everyone thought it would be a good idea.

    Again, let me state, this is in unarmed self defense training. The end result was that it got to the point that I hard to try really, really hard to catch them by surprise and an attack when I would catch them would land on a well implemented defense.
     
  13. pagj17

    pagj17 New Member

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    A safer alternative, similar to what Perpetual Student is proposing, is going through a simunitions course, or even getting into airsoft. (Don't fault me here, if You disagree, I accept that but don't harp on me) my airsoft 1911 ran off of basically propane, used a similar sized mag, and had the same bushing, guide rod/spring barrel etc setup, although much of it was polymer. It's far from perfect, but my airsoft guns sent the bb downrange at 1/3rd to 1/2 the speed of a 230grn 45acp. I was able to learn at a younger age how to clear rooms and such, and when I played I did fairly well. I even used "standard cap" mags. It's a useful tool in force on force movement and communication. I and even transitions, reloading, etc.
     
  14. PerpetualStudent

    PerpetualStudent New Member

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    Those are all great ideas!!

    But, the minute you know it's not real, you will respond in like-kind. Perhaps not intentionally, but the result is the same. It was the surprise factor that I found to be an important though often missing element in programs.
     
  15. PerpetualStudent

    PerpetualStudent New Member

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    As a training tool, I see how simunitions and airsoft can be extremely helpful. But, like everything, there are pros and cons.
     
  16. pagj17

    pagj17 New Member

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    Exactly. I loved airsoft because I got some good experience... but there were a lot of bad players... that and I still have pockmarks from popping them out of my skin:p
     
  17. PerpetualStudent

    PerpetualStudent New Member

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    LoL. I read on another post where someone didn't agree with such training because they may often lead to bad habits. Using insufficient cover, being braver than you should be, etc...
     
  18. pagj17

    pagj17 New Member

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    that's a good point. Where I was at , even with airsoft, we had "concealment" unless we were behind a damn tree.
     
  19. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Glockstar, there is absolutely nothing wrong with any of the training tips given here, but the exercise before firing, as I always understood it, was for the purpose of raising your heart rate and destroying your fine motor skills so that you were using only your gross motor skills the same as when under stress. You can also carry a 30-70 lb pack and drop it right before firing just to throw off your balance and give you a light-headed feeling, or stand on a square piece of plywood centered on a smooth log laid on its side or hard wooden ball while shooting - another couple of ways to challenge yourself. I personally like slipping Snap Caps into magazines to simulate misfires/hangfires for shooting partners without their knowledge.

    However, true adrenaline release only comes from either inducing it through a drug injection, or actual fear. The reason most people experience "true" fear is because they experience something they are not ready for or did not perceive as a threat when first spotted. This is the purpose of the "Cooper Color Codes" as originally developed by Jeff Cooper. It is dealt with a little bit better in this article on "State of Awareness" here. As a person learns to constantly, and I mean CONSTANTLY, evaluate their surroundings and everyone in them, the chance of getting surprised by someone and attacked, thereby releasing large amounts of adrenaline, decrease significantly. Although there may still be an attack, a person who is mostly or even partially aware of it will seriously stem the release of adrenaline and control the flow of the attack and therefore their response. This is the same result as their control of tachypsychia and auditory exclusion.
     
  20. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    This depends on if the players take it as a kiddie shoot-'em-up game or as a training simulator. If you can get hit ten times and still use all of your limbs to fight back, it's a game and not worth a d__n thing for training. If you can be taken at your word for the times you get hit, and a head or body hit takes you out of the game, a limb hit disables the limb, and everyone properly uses cover and concealment and saves the "Suicide Runs" for their video games, then much can be learned from training with these look-alike, use-alike guns!

    Habits are what you make them. This is a cheap way to either make bad ones into good ones, good ones into great ones, or mess everything up.