Accurate Tacticool Target Rifle - Looking

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by victorzamora, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. victorzamora

    victorzamora New Member

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    Hey guys, my heart was set on a 308....but I'm not going to be picky about caliber. I'm looking for a super precise rifle that won't break the bank, but all while looking cool. Bolt action was also super high on my list...but I've been thinking about it, and for the cost I could just get an AR.

    So, I'm looking for a sexy-looking gun that can shoot sub-MOA out to distance. My max distance is 120 yds right now. However, I hope for much longer max range than that. Another requirement of mine is hoping for customizability. I don't want some completely random, weird gun that no one has parts for (OEM or aftermarket). Hoping y'all could help me out.
     
  2. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Well if your budget will not allow for a total custom build I would recommend a Remington 700 at least to harvest for the reciever. A total "sexy cool" build would include a aftermarker reciever such as a Surgeons, Pierce, BATT, etc.... A Remington 700, however, would allow you to take your time and add on upgrades as you can afford it over time more so than most any other brand of rifle I can think of. My first build was off a Remington 700 L/A reciever in 300 WM that I harvested from an inexpensive SPS version of the rifle. All they're recievers are the same for reference. (SPS, ADL, BDL as example) Basically I threw away everything of the rifle but the reciever and then I had it trued for the build with all the other replaced parts with aftermarket.

    I used a Krieger #9 contour MTU barrel, McMillan A-5 stock, Badger Ordance detachable magazine bottom metal, Jewell trigger, Elite Iron Tac 30 muzzel brake, a PT&G bolt and knob, McCanns +20 MOA base, Badger Ordance Rings, and a Premier Reticle 5-25X56mm scope. It shoots holes in holes @ 100 yards with little effort. At 1000 yards it's within MOA when I get it right.

    That being said I'm going to a S/A now and semi retiring my modified L/A, 300 WM, 700 action for a S/A made by Surgeons. Its their 591 reciever. The caliber is in 260 Rem. Very similar ballistics to the existing 300 WM I've been shooting for a couple of years. The new rifle is going to be as near a copy of my first rifle as I'm comfortable with it and I don't believe in "changing up horses in the middle of the stream."

    A 308 Win. is great to start with mostly because the barrel life is long compaired to a 300 WM or even a 260 Rem. Ive got just over 1100 rounds through the 300 Win. Mag barrel before it was "shot out" and the 260 should get around 3000 rounds through it before the barrel goes. I've herd of the 308 Win barrels lasting to 7500 rounds or so before they go bye, bye. Regardless, if you build one of these long range things, don't fall in love with the barrel, as in time, if you get into it ,you will be replacing it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012

  3. cbibb

    cbibb New Member

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    I would suggest looking at various rifles from Remington and Savage all have some cool rifles ranging in different price ranges there are lots of after market stuff for Remington and some for Savage allot off custom actions are based on Remington 700 action 308 is an excellent round lots of options look around and be patient when deciding. GOOD LUCK CB
     
  4. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    The Remington 700 5R Milspec is a great rifle out of the box,if that is the brand you go with.
    Savage has several different models in heavy barreled 308's,it all depends on what you want.

    I like Savage's,mainly because I can completely build a rifle from scratch without needing a gunsmith.They also are one of the best shooting rifles out of the box.I have 5 Savage heavy barreled rifles,and they all are great shooters.
    If you want a rifle that can be customized with all sorts of aftermarket parts either brand will serve you well.
    You may also want to look at Tikka,CZ,and Howa.Their products are also very accurate,but they don't have as much aftermarket accessories for those brands.
     
  5. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    If you want cool and very functional try the Howa Axiom stocked rifle in .308. It has a fully free floating stock that also has recoil reduction built into it. Mine is a very nice shooter. It isn't a full blown target gun as described above, but will shoot sum MOA easily. I really like mine. This is also IMO one of the few guns that offers a scope package deal that includes a very good scope. Check it out. Here is a write up from American Rifleman.

    http://www.americanrifleman.org/ArticlePage.aspx?id=1592&cid=3
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I was going to say the Howa Axiom also. Cool looking and accurate. Should fit the bill w/o costing too many bills
     
  7. victorzamora

    victorzamora New Member

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    Yeah, I'm not looking for an incredibly accurate competition-level rifle. I'm not on that kind of budget.

    I had basically completely decided on a Remington 700 in .308 and then I started thinking about the alternatives. What about another caliber? What about a ranged AR-15? I'd bet they'd both go for about the same price. Also, what's the opinion on this one.
     
  8. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    An AR15 is a completely different animal from what most people consider targt rifles. A bolt gun is almost always more accurate than a semi-auto. The 5.56 cartridge won't shoot long range as well as a heavier round, but may be able to do all you want. It is also much less expensive to shoot. To be honest an AR is more fun to shoot and offers easier shooting at different hold positions. I wouldn't be able to shoot my heavy barreled 24" .308 for many shots standing without having to stop and get a better grip or postion. An AR in 5.56/223 is very comfortable to transition to different positions and offers the grin inducing rapid fire ability.

    There are also AR's in heavier calibers that may interest you. I have one in 5.56 and .308. A caliber like the 6.8 has promise but does not have the mass appeal yet to get ammo priced down. Good luck.
     
  9. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I'm liking this Remington 700 SPS tactical rifle in 308 Win. for what your going to do. The price seems right and will leave you a good amout of budget $$$$ towards base, rings and scope purchases. These rifles have been known to shoot less than 1 MOA @ 100 yards. This would be an excellent trainer and in this caliber last many rounds before barrel is shot out. Also, as time goes by and you can afford it, this rifle is nearly infinately upgradable with aftermarket parts.

    A semi auto rifle just won't be as accurate as a bolt gun.
     
  10. victorzamora

    victorzamora New Member

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    fireguy, I'm aware they're completely different....but I'm trying to figure out what trade-off I'd like better. An AR would be more fun for general shooting, it would be an AR, and would be an AR (next highest rifle after this Tacticool Target rifle). Problem is, there is no deer-killing ability with it. The Remington 700 isn't going to be as much "fun" nor was it originally highest on my list...but it will kill deer. However, I have a 12GA for that....plus, I've never actually been deer hunting and have no plans to.

    From what I've read, though....both the 308 and the 223 are going to be effective out to 500/600 yards. Will the 308 be more accurate than the 223 at distances 500yds+?


    It really seems like if I get a 308 bolt action, it's going to be a Remington 700 base model (maybe a level or two up) and I'll use the low price to purchase a scope/base/rings/etc plus customizations. Same thing with an AR if I get one.
     
  11. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    You can get an AR in calibers large enough for deer. In Kansas we can't use
    .223 but larger calibers are legal. The expensive part is a small magazine. Most states won't allow a large caliber mag for hunting. A .223/5/56 AR is able to shoot to 500-600 yards. The round can be affected by wind more than a heavier bullet, though. At that range a .223 doesn't have much oomph left in it either though it will still punch paper.
    Here is a link to more than you might ever want to read about rifles.
    http://www.chuckhawks.com/index2d.rifles.htm
     
  12. victorzamora

    victorzamora New Member

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    fireguy, the problem with an AR10 (for example) is that the two main benefits of the AR are negated. I want an AR as a cheap(ish) gun to shoot that I can just dump a mag of without my shoulder (or my wallet) hating me for it.

    About killing a deer, I've never been hunting and have no plans to. It was just something I was pointing out. However, I do feel like a bolt-action R700 will be more dedicated to putting one big hole in a small piece of paper really far away.
     
  13. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    Putting holes in holes is more what a bolt gun can do. An AR of any kind not so much.

    100 yard zero 1017.2010 001.jpg

    Once you start doing this with very little effort you won't want to shoot much anything else.:D
     
  14. ArmyGuy

    ArmyGuy New Member

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    Do you mind me asking what you were using when you did that handy work? I wish I could do that.
     
  15. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    300 Win. Mag. with 210 grain Berger target bullets. It was only my 100 yard zero so it's not that special. The rifle is built around a Remington 700 reciever only. The rest is all aftermarket. The barrel is shot out now and the new barrel should be here fairly soon. I'm having a 260 Rem. built now.

    Heres a pic of the rifle that I shot that group with.

    053.jpg
     
  16. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    It took me a bit of time before I could shoot that good. The rifle could always do it but not me. I spent money to go to several clilics for long range shooting and I had to correct a few of the bad habits I had developed over the many years that I had been shooting. Lots and lots of practice. Still sometimes I have off days that I shoot worse than I was shooting before but when I get in "the groove" it's pretty much unbelieveable to me how good it gets. I've been off from shooting long range for a few months and shooting like this does have a shelf life for me. It will probably take a couple of months to get back where I was and then continue to progress. This is one of the most expensive shooting hobbies that I have gotten myself into and it is extremely addicting as well as somewhat spendy.
     
  17. victorzamora

    victorzamora New Member

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    I've seen that gun on the forums before, and I LOVE IT!! That McMillan A5 is exactly what I'm looking for in a stock, but about 10x more expensive! If you feel the need to donate it to a broke college kid with a fiancee, I can get you my address...and I'll even pay the shipping!
     
  18. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    If you think your a broke college kid now wait until you get into one of these. When I was in college I would have never been able to afford both. Christ, I only had a cheap 12 guage duck gun then and even couldn't always get away to hunt. So get that college degree or two, get that carrer or business going, break off the bank making that money, save and invest that money, and you can afford many of these. :D
     
  19. victorzamora

    victorzamora New Member

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    Hahaha, that's the plan! Hopefully I'll get my degree next may and be able to use it to buy many, many pieces of metal used to throw smaller pieces of metal into a little hole. Guns are high on my list, but right after this target rifle is going to be reloading stuffs.

    The reason I want to make the right decision the first time is because my list of guns to buy is too long to make the wrong choice so early :D

    Anyway, it seems like the 700 is the way to go. I might just get the absolute base model, cheapest 700 I can and add little things slowly. There are a couple of things I've read as cheap things to increase accuracy. One of them was a series of 50-75 bullets that "sand" the barrel smooth. I might just try little things one at a time as I can afford them and hopefully get the prettier stock farther down the road. The Axiom stock is also an option on the 700. Is the Axiom that good of a stock?
     
  20. victorzamora

    victorzamora New Member

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    Also, what's the opinion on the bull barreled version? Is it worth the extra cost? Are there any drawbacks?