About to buy a mosin

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by darthjkf, Dec 15, 2013.

  1. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    My father is about to buy a Mosin from a FFL and I need some questions to ask the dealer before making the purchase.
     
  2. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    it has the cosmoline removed and has a bayonet.
     

  3. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    When you order a gun online if the gun is not everything the seller promised you can decline the gun. It costs nothing to decline a gun. Once you fill out the paperwork, pay the FFL fee and walk out the door the gun is yours. Inspect the gun well before you fill out any paperwork.

    For milsurp specific questions this site has a lot of great info for buyers. http://www.milsurps.com/content.php
     
  4. fortinsj

    fortinsj New Member

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    Is he buying it from a store or online? If your buying it from a store take the bolt out and inspect the barrel. Is the barrel couterbored or not? Many were arsenal rebuilt, and you want to make sure yours will be a fine shooter. Are you getting anything else with it besides the bayonet? Usually they come with the bayonet, sling, tool, oiler, and magazine pouches. I may be forgetting another accessory but I'm not sure. You can find a ton of mosin info online with a simple google seach. Hope this helps and good luck with the purchase
     
  5. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    An FFL dealer.
     
  6. austin92

    austin92 New Member

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    You need to remove the bolt by sliding it all the way back and pulling the trigger, it will fall right out, then check the bore. Look through the barrel at a light to make sure it's not pitted from corrosive ammo or shot out. Then you want to check the crown. Do this by shining a flashlight down the mussel side of the barrel to see if it has been counter bored. If it is, it's not nessisarily bad, just a sign of lots of use. Since rimmed casings (7.62x54r) index their head spacing off the cartridges rim so theres not a huge concern about head space but it could never hurt to run a set of go no-go gauges through it. You can test the strength of the firing pin spring by putting the bolt in like a half cock and pulling the trigger. A good spring will cause the bolt to close the ALL THE WAY, and rather quickly. If the bolt handle just kinda drops a little bit and doesn't fully close you might have some light primer strikes with it. Make sure they include all the accessories that are supposed to go with it. Not much more to look out for. Buy some ammo and shoot the hell out of it!

    Here's what it should come with aside from the bayonet. You may or may not get a sling. The other picture is the "half cocked" I was talking about.
     

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  7. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    Thanks for the help
     
  8. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter Active Member

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    Dry fire it too. Make sure the metal bands holding the top handguard are holding it in place tightly

    Check for cracks in the stock too. A decent MN cleans up real nice
     

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    Last edited: Dec 16, 2013
  9. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    Ok. We are planning to get an aftermarket stock. Any suggestions? Scout style scope is out of the question.
     
  10. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    Get the ati Monte Carlo stock. I got it for my sporter Mosin project and I have zero bad things to say about it. It's pretty heavy and does a great job absorbing the recoil of that thunderous round and the recoil pad is pretty good too. Here's a pic of my Mosin I used the ati conversion kit on...be very careful when buying a Mosin. I haven't seen anyone post about it but read carefully because this is the worst thing that can happen when buying a Mosin. You will more than likely suffer from a not-so-rare disease, especially around here, called Mosinitus. Mosinitus can have a few different symptoms including getting your C&R license and renting extra storage space for housing all the Mosins, oil cans, bayonets, slings and cleaning kits you bought because now that you have your C&R you can get them sent right to your door. You will more than likely end up with more than one Mosin...excersize extreme caution when buying your first Mosin. It will not be your last.
     

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  11. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    How much drilling is required for the scope?
     
  12. hq357

    hq357 New Member

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    You will most likely have to buy a kit for your mosin nagants bolt handle if you want to mount a scope. The mosin nagants bolt handle stick straight out to the right and when you turn your bolt it will bang your scope and you won't be able to cock it, this is why the bolts are usually bent downward on scoped mosins
     
  13. hq357

    hq357 New Member

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    And also try and get a hex reciever if you can they are a little more desirable and can be drilled and tapped for long eye relief scopes matching numbers are also a plus there are 4 places to look for matching numbers 1 on the reciever 2 on the bolt, 3. Under the the gun on the magazine 4 on top of the steel but plate some will have the numbers electro penciled and force matched if you get a mosin nagant before 1942 it will Probably be a lot nicer since it wasn't made during war try and get a mosin before 1942 and counter bore means that the rifle has been drilled smooth about 2 inches into the muzzle. The hex recievers usually have a nicer action but the ones after 1942 are okay. There are two soviet factories that made mosins izhevsk and tula both are ok but people tend to like the tulas better there isn't really a diffrence make sure your first mosin is nice you'll either love it or hate it if you bought a bad condition one don't get the chinese mosins almost all of them are junk
     
  14. hq357

    hq357 New Member

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    Go to 762x54r.net to get more info it will answer most questions
     
  15. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter Active Member

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    I am becoming more fanatical about Moisin Nagants everyday. For me they are project guns, but only in the sense that I try to bring them back to a 'new' look.

    With some of the kits out there, and you mentioned stock replacement, I have to say for about the same money (or less) you can get modern rifle/scope combination that will be a better shooter. The soft point rounds in 7.62 x 54r are out there (if your dad is going to hunt), but not available everywhere and not much selection at all. Not trying to talk you out of anything, but, if you are going the Mosin route to save $$ and then proceed to sporterize it - you will not be saving any money IMHO
     
  16. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    Chloeshooter is absolutely right. If you end up sporterizing then you will end up spending about the same money you would spend buying a modern rifle, which is almost a guarantee to be more accurate. The two reasons i sporterized mine was because I got a deal on a pair of Chinese Mosins and I kept one original and the one I sportered I was just looking for a fun project to do. If you decide that putting a scope mount, new bolt handle and a new stock is something you want to do as a learning experience please don't use a hex receiver or any of the more valuable Mosins. All that being said, it's your life, your gun so do whatever your heart desires. If you do end up getting that ATI kit you need to get a new tap to use instead of the one that comes with it. When I did mine luckily I broke it off in the Bolt handle instead of the receiver.
     
  17. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    All taps are easy to break. All usable taps are case hardened. Case hardening makes metal brittle. It isn't that ATI sent a bad tap, you had to break a couple of them to learn to use a tap. Everyone that is handy with a tap has broken a few of them during the learning process.

    I have a 91/30 that shoots just fine. It is a great short range hunting rifle. I have made some longer shots with it. I killed a coyote at 580 yards with a 91/30. I also missed a fox and another coyote in the same place.

    I can't advise anyone to sporterize a milsurp rifle unless they have a Mauser. You can buy a rifle that will shoot sub MOA groups with factory ammo for under $500. There is no upside to sporterizing milsurp rifles other than self satisfaction. No matter what you do to a Russian Mosin Nagant it is still a $130 rifle that shoots as accurately as a shotgun with slugs.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2013
  18. longunner

    longunner New Member

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    Well the one I got after breaking the one ATI sent me worked no problem. The ATI tap broke on the first hole I did but the other one I bought did 3 with no problems. I have tapped holes before.
     
  19. darthjkf

    darthjkf New Member

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    The one that is being sold is a round reciever.
     
  20. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter Active Member

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    I think a lot of people forget what they were designed for - killing Germans in an old-school, trench-warfare type situation. Yes they were used as sniper rifles. But in Stalingrad it was building to building type shooting and the same thing existed in Berlin in 1945.

    Mosins were designed for simplicity in manufacturing and to your point about modern rifles, they were not even close in terms of tolerances, etc. Last time I checked we don't mount bayonets on modern rifles either

    I would not hesitate to use a M-N out to 150 yards or so to take a deer with open sights. There are some hunting situations (woods) here in Minnesota where I'd actually prefer it. But like you say, let's not kid ourselves these things aren't Remington 700s