A trend I noticed with some new gun buyers

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by StainlessSteel215, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. StainlessSteel215

    StainlessSteel215 New Member

    821
    0
    0
    Maybe its a geographical thing, maybe its just SOME of my friends (in their early 30's) but I am seeing a new trend with some new gun owners that doesnt sit well with me...

    All this recent panic buying, although good to see our community growing, isnt always by strong 2A supporters who understand whats going on. I think many are just buying guns to keep "just in case" or because right now its "cool" to own guns. What I mean is, I know 3 guys my age.....who all recently bought their first pistols and although Ive been vocal with them about ammo availability and taking a stand for the gun community....I am seeing all 3 of them as well as many new gun owners who are very sheepish and quiet about their guns.

    Maybe I am being impatient and these folks will find their voice once they get more familiar being a gun owner.....but for now I consider them almost embarrassed to embrace this lifestyle. I recently engaged 2 of them in emails about scoring ammo local places....to help them out....and none of them really seem interested. They either dont FULLY understand the ammo availability right now, or just think having a box or 2 will be enough if they REALLY needed it.

    Does anyone else know new gun owners who are just comfortable playing the sidelines.....and not really making a big effort to learn the gun, get good shooting it, or bother keeping an adequate supply of ammo? Or, are my expectations too high for some of these new gun buyers?
     
  2. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

    21,326
    168
    63
    All of the above. And if they are not your kids, having expectations of them IS a bit presumptive.

    Some will buy a gun, put it away "just in case". They are not into shooting sports. And won't be.

    Some will get into shooting. Careful that we don't put them off.

    The ones that do not get into shooting will be a source of inexpensive firearms for us that ARE into shooting- within the next 2-3 years.
     

  3. StainlessSteel215

    StainlessSteel215 New Member

    821
    0
    0
    Haaa! Great response c3.....I think you helped me come back to reality.

    Not everyone who owns a gun are true enthusiasts like we are. I suppose I am being pretty presumptuous and assuming, because Ive shot rifles and shotguns with my dad and brothers since my early teens.

    I will ease up. Specially after my last email went basically ignored by my 2 buddies to take advantage of a great bulk ammo deal from a guy I know. Ahhhh well....maybe some day they will come around
     
  4. NC1760

    NC1760 New Member

    1,104
    0
    0
    First off.. Good job on trying to make more of "us" and less of "them". If they come around, they come around... if not, as long as they practice safe firearm habits... It's still a free country (for now). Leave them with an open invitation to have some range time together soon and see what happens.
     
  5. GrtWhytHype

    GrtWhytHype New Member

    213
    0
    0
    Got to agree with NC1760,
    Instead of trying to involve them in bulk buys invite them out to the range. You don't really realize how expensive this hobby is until you start having fun. If they lock up the gun and barely use it then those 2 boxes of ammo they locked up with it seem like overkill to them. Set up some training targets and after they burn through 300 rounds having a good time THEN they might be willing to invest in some bulk purchases.

    Be a good drug dealer and feed the addiction first. Then let them feed it themselves! As I always say, the first taste is always free! :-D
     
  6. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,788
    406
    83
    It was Kool , very KOOL..! That's what got me in the first place. My whole family is "Anti-gun" by nature. Nobody in my close direct family , sisters , brother , father , but ole Mom , was at least open minded about it. Hell , I even got her to shoot a few times. Her final words , "Just be careful" son.!

    It was the "KOOL-FACTOR" that got me in the first place..!

    Now , I really am Kool and the interest , over the years has become a full blown "ADDICTION"..!

    (Darwin)- , let things sort themselves out . They will anyhow , just another amongst many a reason to keep peak awareness , (DUCK -n- COVER)..!

    EeeeeeK..!
     
  7. Tulyhunter

    Tulyhunter New Member

    10
    0
    0
    I have to think that teaching more young people, and women safe firearms practice is the way to go. Anyone willing to go shoot,hunt, or simply own a firearm is on our side. Encourage everyone to get involved but don't expect everyone to take to it as we do.
     
  8. txpossum

    txpossum New Member

    1,638
    0
    0
    I have a friend who just turned 50, and over the past couple of years has bought four or five guns. He's getting into it more, mostly because of myself and another guy who, like me, grew up around them, and, unfortunately not like me, is a top ranked Bullseye shooter. But all the new guy knows about is modern, composite frame guns. When the other gun guy and myself bring some of our old "classics" around, he says, "Wow, that feels GOOD". There is definitely a difference between someone who buys one or more guns just "in case" and those who have been "gun bugs" for decades.
     
  9. F4U

    F4U Well-Known Member Supporter

    2,557
    63
    48
    There were 2 or 3 guns around our house when we were kids, but Dad was not a gun guy. There was a .22 rifle for groundhogs, if they were too far away for a .22 then weren't a problem. There was a 16 guage J C Higgins bolt action shotgun that Grandpa bought when my dad and uncle were in their teens so they could hunt with the neighbor kids. And there was a .22 revolver that was the very definition of a "saturday night special" that Dad bought Mom when she went back to work after us boys were old enough to pack our own lunch before school in the morning. She worked midnights at an answering service (remember those?), and Dad was worried that she was there all alone all night.

    I remember several times hearing people talking in the middle of the night and coming down the steps to find a stranger using our telephone while Mom had the shotgun aimed in their general direction. We were way out in the sticks our nearest neighbor was close to a mile away. Or they were stuck back on the oil well roads and wanted somene to pull them out.

    There was a Sherriffs deputy knocking on the door very late one night, "he was stuck could we pull him out?" He had chased a lifted 4wd truck up an oil well road and must have been flying because he slid 40 or 50 feet on his rear axle after the ruts got so deep that his tires didn't touch the ground any more. He was too embarrassed to call for a tow truck. He told us that the normal patrol schedule meant that if we had a problem the likely best response wuld be about 12 minutes and 20 minutes would be more likely.

    That was probably 30 years ago but word gets aroung the rank and file cops when you help them out, Mom lets the sherriff dept know when they leave for Az every fall and if there are tracks in the snow in their driveway I get a call from the Sherriffs dept letting me know and asking if I was over to check on their place.
     
  10. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

    2,565
    0
    0
    Interesting. All the 2a hoopla everyone is in arms about (don't tell ME I can't have a _ _ _)...... Yet you are concerned someone else isn't doing it "right". Most firearms owners are way less into it than the folks who contribute to this site. To say they don't 'get it' confuses me ...... Your buddy wasn't interested in scoring ammo and that's an issue? It sounds like church people talking about who has been 'saved' . Gimme a break the rest of the world exists and not everyone thinks about guns 24/7. 1 in 20 firearms owners are NRA members. That should tell you something.
     
  11. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    1
    0
    many people who have firearms view them as nothing more than tools that have a specific use. no different than the shovel or axe they own. they don't see them as sources of recreation or works of art to be admired. they have no different admiration for a wrench than the shotgun they have.
     
  12. CrazedJava

    CrazedJava New Member

    848
    0
    0
    A common problem I see in "enthusiast" communities is that the interest level covers a broad range and some of the more "involved" members can adopt a lack of perspective.

    I hang out here, in the car world, and used to be a big time videogamer. Some common trends I've seen in all three -

    A failure to encourage those that are maybe not as interested or involved
    Making recommendations based on personal preference rather than the needs or interest of the individual looking for information
    A lack of introspection around some of the drawbacks of the recommenders personal preference
    An attitude of some enthusiasts who believe everyone should be as hardcore as them
    An attitude of resentment from those who maybe can't afford some of the nicer guns, cars, games, etc. etc.

    That's just off the top of my head. I would urge gun enthusiasts to treat mere gun owners with respect and patience. I know, I know, I just drew a distinction there, but I don't mean it in a way that is disparaging to people who just want to own a gun. Many of those who bought a gun just to have one are future enthusiasts who may one day become powerful advocates for gun rights. We need to look for those we can foster and not worry quite so much about the rest.

    Unless they're at the gun range with a wandering muzzle, and then I'll worry plenty.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2013
  13. dango

    dango Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,788
    406
    83
    ^^ Just that , could not have said that better..!
     
  14. NC1760

    NC1760 New Member

    1,104
    0
    0
    Man.. you MUST have done some reenacting at some time or another !!! I don't know how many times I've had to say "Are we gonna pick apart each other's kits or are we gonna burn some powder and have some fun ??" :D
     
  15. Daoust_Nat

    Daoust_Nat Well-Known Member Supporter

    3,416
    51
    48
    I have a co-worker, a young man in his late 20s who decided about a year ago that he needed a gun to defend himself, his wife and their son. What did I think, as he was looking at a .380, specifically a S&W Bodyguard. I asked if he had shot one, and he said no, so I suggested he go to a LGS that had one of those and a Sig P238 on the rental wall.

    He ignored the advice, which is his right to do, and bought the Bodyguard. He got one box of target ammo and went to the range. Shot 25 and did not like shooting the gun. Bought a box of hollow points, went home, put the gun up and has not shot it since. He now has it locked up, but "ready for defense." Whatever that means.

    I told him he needed frequent pactice if he thought he might need to use it accurately to defend his family, but he told me he did not like shooting it, and it was fine as is. I said OK, and have not brought it up since.

    You can lead them only as far as they want to be lead. Like C3 said, I am guessing someone will get this one cheaply in a couple more years.
     
  16. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

    2,565
    0
    0
    that same guy usually ends up:
    A) missing altogether
    B) shooting himself in the foot while fumbling with the gun
    C) shoots his wife or kid by mistake

    anything....golf, fly fishing, sports, shooting ....anything that relies on muscle memory takes consistent practice