9mm vs 45 cal

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by jpratt825, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. jpratt825

    jpratt825 New Member

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    I am considering a 9mm 1911, thinking that the smaller caliber would offer a manual slide operation and disassembly more easily performed than a 45 cal 1911.

    Just discussed the idea with a gun dealer who stated that because the barrel pressure of a 9mm is 35k psi versus the 23k psi of the 45 cal call for a stiffer recoil spring, therefore, the 9mm would be the stiffer gun in manual slide operation as well as disassembly.

    Any one have any real experience in this area?
     
  2. General_lee

    General_lee New Member

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    IMO, if you want a 1911, the ONLY way to go is .45, Thats what they were designed to shoot.
    I own 2 .45's and have handled a few 9mm's, I can't really tell a difference in recoil spring strength.
    It does, however vary with the manufacturer. For instance, the recoil spring on a Para Ordnance .45 is stiffer than the spring in my springfield .45's.
     

  3. Jpyle

    Jpyle New Member

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    Is this a serious question? Are you really asking whether you should base your choice of caliber on the stiffness of a spring or how difficult it is to rack the slide or disassemble? If those are real issues get a revolver.
     
  4. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I just shoot .45acp and 10mm in mine.
     
  5. GreyEclipse

    GreyEclipse New Member

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    Get a revolver if you want simplicity.
     
  6. AllenM

    AllenM New Member

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    I have 2 9mm 1911's the springs are lighter than 45. I run a 15 lb in my 5" 9 vs either stock 16lb or my prefered 18.5 in the 45.s
    The Kimber AGEIS Pro (commander size) 9mm that I have I am not sure what spring weight is in it as I have not shot it enough to replace yet.

    If you seriously want a 9mm 1911. I strongly endorse the Kimber AEGIS series.
    Mine has run flawlessly
     
  7. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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  8. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I'm with cane, if you want a 9mm, get a high power. The 1911 needs to be a 45.
     
  9. AllenM

    AllenM New Member

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    I don't necessarily feel that way.
    the Hi Power's or most other guns in general don't feel and shoot for me as well as a good 1911.
    I have 2 9mm's, 1 10mm with one more on order and a .460 rowland in the works along with and 5 in 45.
    But my 9 mm fusion as just pure shooting joy.
    It is not a carry gun like my Kimber but I use it for both steel plate competition and cheap lead bullet plinking.
    It is one of my most favorite 1911's If I had followed advice not to own a 1911 in 9mm I would have missed out :)
     
  10. jpratt825

    jpratt825 New Member

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    Thanks, my problem is age and strength of my hands. I have difficulty operating the slide on the 1911's but prefer the feel of a good steel frame with the balance and weight of the 1911 over the new polymers.
    If the 9mm is stiffer bescause of the difference in recoil spring requirements, then I will stick to the 45 and install a good progressive spring and two piece guide rod.
     
  11. Desperado-OPs

    Desperado-OPs New Member

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    I may have missed it in your earlier post but what is the reason for buying a gun? Is it for self defense like CCW, competition, general target shooting, duty carry?
    When I gun shop, I look for the "perfect" gun that will fit my needs. Smaller is not always better when it comes to guns. For example a mini 9mm gun will have more "felt" recoil than a full sized .40 or .45 sometimes. Lighter weight guns generally seem to kick harder also.
    The 1911 design is timeless. It has withstood the test of time and remains to be possibly the most popular handgun ever made. It, however, can be finicky and is undoubtedly more difficult for assembly/disassembly then most modern handguns.
    Although, I have never fired a 9mm 1911 or BHP, you may be able to find a gun shop or friends that will let you shoot theirs and you can make a better decision based upon how they feel to you.
    Good luck in your hunt
     
  12. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    a stock .45 1911 you can rack the slide by putting the bushing against the edge of a table and pushing. there is no guide rod to get in the way if pulling a slide back is that much of an issue. most 9mm versions of any gun have guide rods which would get in the way of "alternate methods" of racking a slide. you can also get less than 230grn loadings for a .45 in semi-wadcutter or wadcutter formats that have much less felt recoil than light loadings in 9mm if that is an issue and corresponding lighter springs to work with.

    however in just general speaking if your really having issues and want a .45 feel but just want to target shoot nothing wrong with .22LR conversions. much less felt recoil and easier operation physically. while maintaining the feel of a 1911 with a steel frame. this allows you to fire a few centerfire rounds until your tired out then switch to .22LR.

    Just a few different directions you could go.
     
  13. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    There are plenty of 9mm platforms out there that are easy on the hands. For a classic, look a High Power or Walther P1/P38, They are really outstanding. For a slightly more modern handgun the Sig P225 is outstanding.
     
  14. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    I have a Springer 9mm 1911 that I pole holes in paper with. It's good for that but I don't think I'd have one as a carry/protection weapon but I'm a 45 guy when it comes for what I carry around with me. It's no easier to take down than the others in my opinion. But I've never had issue with how a 1911 broke down. I guess it's from having them so long.

    It takes a little getting used to shooting one in 9mm I"ll say. The lack of any real recoil in that big steel frame makes it stay put almost like it was a 22:cool:
     
  15. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    I've owned both and the slide operation on a 9mm 1911 is roughly the same as on a .45 version. As far as changing the spring in your .45, if you go to light you'll batter the frame and cause operational problems.

    No easy answer if hand strength is the issue. As has been mentioned, if your 1911 has the Colt type short rod & plug, you can operate the slide by pressing the bushing against a table...
     
  16. jpratt825

    jpratt825 New Member

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    Thanks for all the replies. I really appreciate all of you. My decision will certailny be tempered by your responses. Thanks and good shooting.
     
  17. jpratt825

    jpratt825 New Member

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    After reading all of the responses to my previous post, I realized that a lot of shooters are 45 cal die-hards. And that's ok. I had a Taurus 1911PT in 45 cal and it was the worst shooting handgun I have ever owned. The workmanship was sub-par and the recoil was tremendous.

    I just recently satisfied my curiosity about the 9mm 1911 and purchased the Springfield Armory 1911-A1 in 9mm. I have to be honest, this is the best production semi I have ever shot. Extremely accurate with a vast difference in recoil and muzzle bounce. I know some of you are going to down grade the 9mm but it fits my needs very well.

    Thanks for all of the input from those of you who did respond.
     
  18. glock2740

    glock2740 New Member

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    I have quite a few .45 1911's and one 9mm 1911. As stated above, the 9mm's have lesser power springs. But honestly, side by side, there's no difference. If you can rack the slide of a .45 1911, then the 9mm will not be a problem. The 9mm 1911 i have(Kimber Stainless Custom Target II) is a really nice gun to shoot and ammo is alot cheaper for 9mm as compared to .45ACP. You won't go wrong with either 1911 that you choose.