9mm vs. 40

Discussion in 'Semi-Auto Handguns' started by jkeenanjr, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. jkeenanjr

    jkeenanjr New Member

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    I'm looking at picking up my first handgun. I will be carrying it as well as using it for shooting at the range. The size of the gun isn't an issue seeing as I am 6 foot 6 and 450 pounds. I'm also deciding between the S&W M&P and the Springfield Armory XDm. I'm looking for opinions from seasoned shooters.
     
  2. Thadeuce

    Thadeuce New Member

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    So are you looking for input on the gun, the caliber, or both?
     

  3. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    Like I tell any new shooter or anyone new to firearms, pick what feels the best to you, what is most comfortable to you. Go to some local gunshops/gunshows and compare the two and others aswell (if you want).

    My opinion on your two choices is, I would choose the Springfield XDm. I find the Springfield XDm more attractive than the M&P, I love the fact it has a grip saftey instead of a thumb saftey, it has a multiple backstrap system, and it just feels better to ME. Like I said compare the two and see which feels the best to you and then see which has the features you want/like.

    For 9mm versus .40, I would choose the .40 personally, because I like to have more punch than the 9mm. If you have some local ranges with rental programs I would suggest you try out the two calibers (and guns if possible). The 9mm offers a little higher magazine capacity, softer recoil, and is a little cheaper. The .40 offers more punch, but costs a little in magazine capacity and has more recoil.

    If you don't plan on shooting much I recommend starting with the 9mm, but if you plan on shooting a lot or a fair amount I recommend the .40.
     
  4. Olympus

    Olympus New Member

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    When I first started buying pistols, I bought into the whole "9mm is a sissy caliber/.40s are so much better" argument that a lot of people would give. I bought a lot of different polymer frame .40s. After my taste in guns and calibers became more refined and I started noticing some of the more subtle differences, I found that I didn't care for the snappy recoil of the .40 caliber in a polymer frame. Nothing wrong with it, I just didn't really like it. I sold every .40 caliber gun I owned. To this day, I don't own a single .40 caliber pistol. Not to say there is anything wrong with them, I just enjoy shooting other calibers MUCH more.

    My primary carry is a Ruger SR9c loaded with some Double Tap +P hollow points that are guaranteed to give anyone a bad day. And if I want more power, I will switch to a .357, a .45, or maybe even a 10mm if I'm feeling frisky. The .40 caliber gets passed over and I never even notice it's missing! :D
     
  5. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    + 1 on the 9mm.

    When you find a gun/caliber that you are good with the water cooler talk about size matters goes right out the window.

    Two years ago I checked the Browning Hi-Power off my bucket list and found my now-favorite carry piece!

    This vintage BHP took off about 15% of the time needed for lethal double tap hits. It also turned what was a waste of time and ammo Mozambique Drill into a serious triple tap skill.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And as far as the 10mm Lite;

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2011
  6. Firearms4ever

    Firearms4ever New Member

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    I need to get a Browning Hi Power one of these days :eek:. It just so happens there's a gunshow in my area this weekend, and maybe I'll find a vintage one for a good price :D (very hopefull)
     
  7. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    choice tween 40 and 9mm... 9mm hands down. both rounds are very close balistically and they are gonna put pretty much the same size hole in the target. would rather have more capacity and better follow up shot speed with the 9mm.

    as for sw or xd... as said above grip safety is a huge plus. i would personally pick the xd

    ive owned 9mm in the past and may again sometime but i see no point to the 40sw. to me the 40sw is a solution in search of a problem.

    i dont own a xd or a sw of any type but i have shot them before the xd just feels better for a striker gun.
     
  8. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    Get the .40, it's bigger. You're a big boy so you can handle it.
    Better yet, get the xdm 45!
     
  9. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    I never had a ton of interest in a .40. If you plan to do a lot of plinking then the 9mm is a no brainer and if you want more power then go for the gold and get a .45 instead. Plus it would make a better plinking gun as well.
     
  10. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Canebrake, I was out at the range one day when an unknown shooter allowed me to shoot some of his military collection. I picked up the Browning Hi-Power and the first thought was, "What a great feel!" I then proceeded to place 12 out of 13 rounds into a 8" steel at 50 yards. "What a great shooter!" This was in 1988. I've owned and carried a Hi-Power ever since. I always felt like I owed John Browning a great debt for his innovation and invention of this fine firearm.
     
  11. TekGreg

    TekGreg Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I think you pretty much hit the nail on the head, Jon. The bullet difference is .045 (45 thousandths) of an inch and on a self-sealing surface like human skin, this is not enough to make a difference. Also, something not normally mentioned in these discussions is that every other caliber surrounding .40 S&W (9mm, .357, 10mm, .38) all have +P loadings or are by nature high-pressure rounds, except the .40 S&W! Yet when I have the .40 in my hand, it's tendency to whip the front sight off the target and the time it takes to bring it back on target is a huge disadvantage to me when engaging multiple targets. On top of the fact that the .40 is inherently less accurate than a lot of 9mm and .357 and .357Sigs (m personal experience and FBI testing), I have always chosen the faster round to engage multiple targets, even with +P ammo, and supplement it with high-quality defensive ammo and extra high-capacity magazines.
     
  12. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    When I pick up a J M Browning designed firearm I seem to be able to "feel" Browning's DNA in the gun's form.

    The man knew and understood ergonomics way before the word was coined and its science was studied.

    Yes, I am a John Moses Browning disciple! :p
     
  13. sweeper22

    sweeper22 New Member

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    M&P vs XDm?
    I believe most quality polymer guns are relatively equal. These are both quality guns. So are Glock, FNP, H&K, Ruger SR9, CZ SP-01 Phantom, etc. Which is best for you boils down to the fit, the feel, controls, features, and the details that you prefer. In my opinion if you spend $300+ on a polymer handgun (and it's not a Taurus), you'll probably be happy enough with the performance and reliablility. FWIW, I have an XDm45.

    9mm vs 40sw?
    I like 9mm. But that's me. I like that I can quickly put multiple shots on target with a 9mm easier than a 40sw. That may be less of an issue for you, given you're considerably larger than me. 40sw is a very good defense caliber, but I personally prefer shooting the 9mm..."classic" versions especially, Browning Hi-Power and CZ 75b. Again, just a matter of preference.

    If you're deciding between M&P, XDm (or XD)...9mm, 40sw (or even 45acp)...anything that feels good in your hand is likely to be an excellent handgun and adequate for personal defense. You really can't go wrong here.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011
  14. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    Wait....what?
     
  15. WDbeej

    WDbeej New Member

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    M&P is American made if that has any bearing for you. It did for me and I have no regrets other than I can't shoot it every day.

    Another thing to consider is how much you are going to practice. If you practice alot you need to consider the cost of rounds. 40 & 45 cal is more expensive than 9 mm. If you are not going to practice, buy a shotgun.

    I bought an M&P9 as my first pistol. It has shot well right out of the case and has been easy enough to take down and clean for a novice such as myself. Maybe some day I will purchase a Browning 45 ACP, but as a first gun I did well with the M&P.
     
  16. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    Yeah, sounds backwards to me too.
     
  17. ZombieKiller83

    ZombieKiller83 New Member

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    I think what he means is that the .40 will require more trigger time to become proficient than the 9mm will.

    As for the whole "9mm for sissy's" , ".40 being yuppie rounds" and ".45 being the end all be all" i don't buy into that crap. With proper shot placement a 9mm will do just fine.

    Those kind of comments always remind of all the guys buying the big 3/4 or 1 ton trucks but never actually using them for what they were designed for. I guess whatever makes you feel more like a man, who am i to judge :rolleyes:

    I have 9mm's, .40 and a .45 and if someone were to break into my house right now my SR9c would be the first gun i pick up as i'm the most confident in my abilities with that gun. Don't buy into the caliber garbage, go with what works for YOU
     
  18. goatrat

    goatrat New Member

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    I prefered the XD over the M&P when all I was doing was fondling them at the counter. Then I took the guys advice and rented both, less than 10 rounds through each and the I had chosen the M&P.


    Spend the money and do some rentals.


    I still want to buy an XD though...Can you have too many guns?
     
  19. RecklessRegard

    RecklessRegard New Member

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    Does he mean when related to confidence....

    If you practice more, with .40 or .45, you can have the better ballistics of a heavier round?? If not, it sounds real backward.

    :confused::confused::confused:
     
  20. Dizzll

    Dizzll New Member

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    I'm no expert by any means but after thousand of rounds thru many calibers I still can't shoot anything as good as 9mm. But I carry 40 and 45. Am I dumb lol?