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I've got a 9mm pistol here , PB Mc1937-1937 BREVETTATO XVI , a crown on lower grip , RE , left side of grip , K , on right side Z !

What is it..?
 

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It is a Beretta 9mm. The crown represents the Royal Arms. 1937 is around the time of the ww 2. A service pistol for the Italians.
 

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While it is a 9mm it could be a 9mm short otherwise known as a 9mm Kurz and 380. The 9mm short/Kurz was very popular back then.
 

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I called a collector/gunsmith. Maybe 500-600 euros if in good condition. A lot more if owned by say Mussolini. The guns are early to mid 1930s. Any way to verify some history? Beretta is the oldest gunmakers in Europe.
 

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While it is a 9mm it could be a 9mm short otherwise known as a 9mm Kurz and 380. The 9mm short/Kurz was very popular back then.
It is a .380 by US standards. It would have said 9 mm Luger otherwise. The gun also came in .32 in US standards.
 

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Really bad ergonomics. Poor grip angle. Mag release on the bottom. Safety is a bear. It was never meant to carry with a round in the chamber. They also made it in 22lr.
 

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Wheres the pictures???

(And why am I the first to ask???) :confused:
 

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I don't recommend this but you can chamber a round in a 1934 Beretta 380 and with the safety in the off (fire position), point the gun in a safe direction, squeeze the trigger just enough to lower the hammer and immediately release it to stop the hammer at the half cock position. That's the same procedure you would use to lower the hammer to half cock position on Winchester lever action rifles that pre-date tang and cross bolt safeties. I think the gun is safe to carry with the hammer on half cock with the safety in the fire position. This would make it as fast to bring into action as any modern double action semi-auto pistol. The reason I don't recommend it is that it requires very careful lowering of the hammer to half cock so that the gun doesn't accidentally discharge.
 

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I don't recommend this but you can chamber a round in a 1934 Beretta 380 and with the safety in the off (fire position), point the gun in a safe direction, squeeze the trigger just enough to lower the hammer and immediately release it to stop the hammer at the half cock position. That's the same procedure you would use to lower the hammer to half cock position on Winchester lever action rifles that pre-date tang and cross bolt safeties. I think the gun is safe to carry with the hammer on half cock with the safety in the fire position. This would make it as fast to bring into action as any modern double action semi-auto pistol. The reason I don't recommend it is that it requires very careful lowering of the hammer to half cock so that the gun doesn't accidentally discharge.
Ever hear the term "going off half cocked"? That is where it came from. Half Cocked is not a safety.
 

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The Italians called the .380 9mm Corto. Kurz is German for "short". 9mm Browning also comes to mind, but not to be confused with 9mm Browning Long. Similar to the .38 auto, just a wee bit shorter
 

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Really bad ergonomics. Poor grip angle. Mag release on the bottom. Safety is a bear. It was never meant to carry with a round in the chamber. They also made it in 22lr.
The "European" mag release is easy to use once you get use to it. My Sig P230 has it also. With one hand you can push the tab, remove the mag and load a mag with one hand in seconds. No different to doing a "tactical reload" with a button mag release.
 

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Beretta's the oldest continuous production company in the world, period. not just guns, not just in Europe. they go back like 450 years.
 

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Beretta's the oldest continuous production company in the world, period. not just guns, not just in Europe. they go back like 450 years.
Great little cars, good on gas too.....



No offense and none taken
 

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The warning not to "go off half cocked" originated with flintlocks with half cock positions and was not a safety warning but simply a warning that the gun won't fire from the half cock position. Nonetheless, it's best not carry most single actions semi-autos in the half cock position. But I've owned and carried my Model 1934 Beretta since 1967 and this all steel gun is extremely well made and does not pose the same danger as, say, a single action Colt with all six chambers loaded. Carried in a belt holster, it is extremely unlikely that one could fall in such a way as to slam the hammer hard enough to cause it to fire the round in the chamber. It is possible but so improbable as not to cause me worry.
 

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Sounds like you have a 1934 Beretta in 9mm Kurz aka 380 auto. In really nice condition with the RE (Army) marking $450-$500.
 

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Marvelous little pistols

The 1934 Beretta is one of the finest of the 'pocket automatic' type pistols of the era. This, notwithstanding they were designed and issued as a belt holster pistol for a modern (World War II era) Army. They are normally quite reliable.

I find the ergonomics nearly perfect. The sights are somewhat basic by current standards, but tend to be relatively visible and friendly to use; AND tend to place rounds on target with more than a vague reference to the sights.

The trigger pull is usually fairly stiff. However, considering they were issued to normal troops and intended for personal defense at close quarters rather than National Match competition, they are adequate. The safety is rather awkward - again by modern standards. I rather think the manual of arms called for carrying the pistol empty chamber and charging when needed to shoot. All that said, I would prefer a Browning-Colt type manual safety. However, since these dandy little pistols are not made any more - and probably never will be made again - one does not routinely modify them.

The heel type magazine retainer-release works quite well and is simple to use. It is NOT well suited for the modern fad of 'instant reload', but a pistol is not a primary assault arm for engaging vast numbers of the unholy all at once. It does keep the magazine in place while firing and controls removal of the magazine without dropping said magazine.

One other word of unsolicited advice. If one has 'fleshy' hands - such as your humble correspondent - one can get 'bit' across the web of the shooting hand by the underside of the slide rails. It is not a grievous wound, but is inconvenient and is painful enough to elicit a word one prefers one's mother not to hear.
 
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